Nine Steps to Painting Your Wheels at Home

Tired of the silver wheels that every car seems to come with these days?  No problem: You can change their color in just nine steps and a few hours.

Step 1: Pick a Method

The common choices are spray paint, rubberized paint like Plasti Dip or Eastwood’s ElastiWrap, or powder coating. This guide will work for spray paint or rubberized paint.

Step 2: Remove Your Wheels

True, they could stay on the car, but you’ll have an easier time and better results if you take them off. Don’t have a spare set to roll around on? Set your car on jack stands, or paint one wheel at a time and leave the spare tire in its place.

Step 3: Clean Your Workspace

Dust and dirt don’t belong near painting projects, so blow off your workbench and mop your floor.

Step 4: Clean Your Wheels

Clean them well. Really, really well. We used Simple Green and a few scrub brushes, but if you’re going to be painting your wheels instead of using ElastiWrap, we’d suggest using a Scotch-Brite pad instead to rough up the old finish.

Step 5: Clean Your Wheels Again

Seriously, it will take two or more passes with degreaser to remove all of the crud and brake dust, and this is the most important step. Make sure you clean the backsides and the crevices, too, as dust left there will ruin the finish.

Step 6: Dry Your Wheels and Tires

We recommend an air blower. Don’t have one? Use a leaf blower, but try to clean the dirt and grass clippings out of it first.

Step 7: Mask Your Wheels

This is easier than it looks: Just use 2-inch-long pieces of tape, and make sure to slip them up under the lip of the wheel. An old credit card can help with this process. Once you’ve outlined the wheel, tape a plastic bag or some newspaper around the outside of the tire.

Step 8: Clean Your Wheels One More Time

This time, though, use a wax and grease remover. Using rubberized paint? We’d suggest using Eastwood’s Surface Prep & Cleaner, which makes ElastiWrap easier to remove if you get tired of it.

Step 9: Paint Your Wheels

Like most painting projects, this step takes the least amount of time. Make sure you use smooth, fluid motions, and try to start and stop the stream of paint before and after the can is over the wheel. We used six thin coats of Eastwood ElastiWrap to paint our wheels.

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Comments
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ebonyandivory
ebonyandivory PowerDork
3/17/20 4:21 p.m.

I love this project. My son and I used a deck of playing cards instead of tape to mask off the sidewalls. To quote Edd China: "It worked a treat!".


 

slowbird
slowbird Dork
3/17/20 4:29 p.m.

I want to paint a couple of the wheels I just bought (to match the other two) but they're practically new so I'm just gonna mask and spray like a rebel without a cause.

JVO6
JVO6
3/17/20 7:27 p.m.

If you use rubberized paint, take the time to peel it from lug mounting surfaces.  It will compress and change lug nut torque. 

Appleseed
Appleseed MegaDork
3/17/20 9:10 p.m.

This is extremely timely.  There's some Motegis that I picked up from Jeff Schwartz  (yes, that Jeff Schwartz) that are black. Black on a black car? No bueno. Gold or bronze is the question.

AAZCD
AAZCD HalfDork
3/17/20 11:09 p.m.

Last week I painted some wheels and didn't mask the tires because I plan to replace them before they go back on the car. I used a sharp scribe around the bead to make sure that the paint on the tires separated from the wheels. For paint I used 'Rustoleum Hammered' paint to save myself from getting all the little curb rash spots sanded down and refilled. Durable and I like the slightly textured finish.

wearymicrobe
wearymicrobe UberDork
3/17/20 11:13 p.m.

Paint never holds up for me no matter how good the application is. Powdercoating all the way.

_
_ Dork
3/18/20 11:36 a.m.

In reply to Tom Suddard :

Nine?!?! Awe man.... I'm too lazy for nine. Have anything in 3 steps or less? Lol. 

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