So You've Drilled Through Your Own Hand

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Written by JG Pasterjak

From the June 2016 issue

Posted in Columns

Congratulations! You’ve joined the elite club of people who have, through their own carelessness or inattention, drilled through their own hand while working on their car.

You know this because when you stopped drilling, the hand that was holding the drill dropped neatly to your side where you store it for future use, while the other hand–the hand you were using to support the back of the panel you were drilling through–mysteriously stayed in place. So did the drill itself, stuck as it was through the metal and your hand meat.

Drilling through your own hand can be a confusing and chaotic time. We’ve prepared this handy (Ha! Get it?) guide to assist you in the aftermath.

1. Confirm that you really drilled through your own hand. Upon drilling through your own hand, there will be several signs. The first will be disbelief and denial. “Surely that was someone else’s hand back there,” you will think, and possibly even say aloud, but it will soon become readily apparent that no one else is present. The humiliation is next, but it will only mask the physical pain for a few seconds, so savor it in its purest form while you can.

2. Find a scapegoat. Next to my shop is a donkey. I mean, he lives there, he doesn’t just stand there at random. It’s technically the neighbor’s donkey, but his… pen? Paddock? Donketorium? Whatever you call the area where a donkey lives is right across from the front of my shop. So when his particular human isn’t around, he’s usually at the fence begging for donkey treats and keeping a watchful eye on my progress.

As he is the perfect foil, whenever a mistake is made in my shop, the resulting crash, bang, pop, fizzle or scrape is usually followed by a loud “Dammit, donkey!” clearly indicating where fault actually lies. The overspray got on the windshield not because I am a sloppy masker, but because the donkey was silently judging me.

Upon hearing my cries, the donkey usually responds with a noise that sounds half like mocking laughter and half like derisive deflection. He’s wise to my schemes by now, but quickly shifting the blame from me to him lessens the psychic burden.

Side note: For you city folk who have never heard a real donkey before, they sound exactly like your drunk friend doing an impression of a donkey.

  1. Now you must act. First, forget about finishing this project tonight. In fact, any upcoming plans not directly related to wound care or gauze replacement are pretty much out the window.

No, it’s time to summon help. For most of us, this will mean calling an ambulance. Hopefully your phone is actually on your person and not just slightly out of reach of your free hand. Drilling through your own hand somewhat limits your mobility, what with the drill bit tunneling through so much tissue and bone and pinning it to the back of the panel you were supporting. But no, really, not using a 2×4 was a good idea. Saved a lot of time, didn’t ya?

Anyway, it’s about now that you begin wishing there were two emergency numbers you could call: one for regular emergencies and one for really embarrassing ones. I’d be more than willing to spend a couple extra bucks toward my deductible if I knew I could expect a certain level of discretion from my rescue professionals.

Let’s face it, 911 dispatchers aren’t stupid, and they’ve seen and heard it all. When they say, “911, what is your emergency?” and you say, “I can’t really say,” they can tell just from the timbre of your voice that your genitals are hopelessly trapped in a pool vacuum fitting while the rest of you is casually nursing a poolside drink like nothing has happened. I’d be willing to bet that after 10 years on the job, a good 911 operator can determine the exact object irretrievably inserted in a caller’s butt based on the first 5 seconds of awkward stalling.

But summon help you must, and when the paramedics show up, there’s pretty much one course of action they’re going to take. They’re going to cut that precious panel–the one you so lovingly supported with your own flesh–around the drill so they can free your hand and deliver the whole mess to the hospital for proper separation.

You wanted to drill one simple hole, but because you didn’t take proper safety precautions, you ended up with a whole mess of sloppily chopped sheet metal to replace. Which reminds me to plug next month’s column: “So You’ve Welded Through Your Own Fingertip.”

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Reader comments:

Fueled by Caffeine
Oct. 4, 2016 3:00 p.m.

I put a deck screw through my finger once. I have it saved in a jar on my desk to remind me never to do it again.

Appleseed
Appleseed MegaDork
Oct. 4, 2016 3:07 p.m.

Realize that into and through one's hand are significantly different things, especially if it's the later.

DanielCut
DanielCut Reader
Oct. 4, 2016 3:10 p.m.

Can't you just reverse the drill?

GameboyRMH
GameboyRMH MegaDork
Oct. 4, 2016 3:15 p.m.
DanielCut wrote: Can't you just reverse the drill?

I'll admit that putting the drill in reverse and slowly backing it out would be my first instinct...although it might not be the medically safest thing to do.

SilverFleet
SilverFleet UberDork
Oct. 4, 2016 3:16 p.m.

You had me at Donketorium.

fasted58
fasted58 UltimaDork
Oct. 4, 2016 3:20 p.m.

WWTOD

What would Todd Orr do?

GameboyRMH
GameboyRMH MegaDork
Oct. 4, 2016 3:22 p.m.
SilverFleet wrote: You had me at Donketorium.

Is a really nice donkey enclosure called an ass palace?

Furious_E
Oct. 4, 2016 3:37 p.m.

One of my best friend's dad used to be a contractor and it felt like every week one of his employees would shoot a nail through his hand with a nail gun. That may or may not have had anything to do with the stupendous amount of beer cans we used to find at his job sites.

JG Pasterjak
JG Pasterjak Production/Art Director
Oct. 4, 2016 3:48 p.m.
Fueled by Caffeine wrote: I put a deck screw through my finger once. I have it saved in a jar on my desk to remind me never to do it again.

The screw or your finger?

BrokenYugo
BrokenYugo UltimaDork
Oct. 4, 2016 4:07 p.m.
GameboyRMH wrote:
DanielCut wrote: Can't you just reverse the drill?

I'll admit that putting the drill in reverse and slowly backing it out would be my first instinct...although it might not be the medically safest thing to do.

I'm not a doctor, but I don't think an impaled hand carries much risk of bleeding out. Might as well put that shock and adrenaline to use and yank it out before it starts hurting like hell.

bluej
bluej UltraDork
Oct. 4, 2016 4:12 p.m.

A lot depends on the bit type/size. A small pilot bit vs. step bit vs. hole saw will require different decision trees. And curses.

Dusterbd13
Dusterbd13 PowerDork
Oct. 4, 2016 4:21 p.m.

Thank you for making today suck less.

And I have done this.

And welded through a finger.

And screwed my hand to a wall.

And gotten second degree burns on my nuts.

My father had a saying: do as I say, not as I do.

Toyman01
Toyman01 MegaDork
Oct. 4, 2016 4:32 p.m.

This thread delivers in spades. Large quantities of plus 1 content. +1

I have never had the pleasure of drilling, screwing, or nailing through my hand. It is a experience I expend a fair amount of energy avoiding. Successfully, so far.

That damn 4" grinder on the other hand...

JG Pasterjak
JG Pasterjak Production/Art Director
Oct. 4, 2016 4:41 p.m.
DanielCut wrote: Can't you just reverse the drill?

So, for the record, this did not actually happen to me. to this point in my life, I have avoided any major shop injuries. I have apparently traded that, however, for an endless string of minor shop injuries, suffered every single time I do darn near anything. I can't wipe off a greasy wrench without drawing at least a little blood, apparently.

Anyway, the original idea for the story comes from Elliott Harvey, and it regards a guy he used to work at a Nissan dealership with. Apparently the dude drilled through his own hand and pinned it to the inside of a fender. As true friends are wont to do, the rest of the techs stood around giving the guy crap while they waited for the ambulance. When someone finally suggested that they just reverse the drill and back it out, I guess the guy finally passed out. Luckily they caught him before he just hung there on his hand.

captdownshift
captdownshift UberDork
Oct. 4, 2016 4:56 p.m.

The worst is when the NiCad battery gives out and it's stuck in there.

EastCoastMojo
EastCoastMojo Mod Squad
Oct. 4, 2016 5:08 p.m.

You just back it out enough to clear the fender. Leave it in the hand hole to keep from bleeding out so much. Although you could unchuck the bit to make transport easier.

RealMiniParker
RealMiniParker UberDork
Oct. 4, 2016 5:15 p.m.
Toyman01 wrote: That damn 4" grinder on the other hand...

I wrassled with a machine that has a 24x10" grinding wheel. It won, but I still have most of the tip of my finger.

Kylini
Kylini HalfDork
Oct. 4, 2016 5:28 p.m.

Detach the bit from the drill, then pull off your hand. Easy peasy.

OHSCrifle
Oct. 4, 2016 5:32 p.m.

Never drilled through my hand. I always manage to get it stopped at just a puncture.

I was twelve and had an interest in woodworking. Retired cabinet maker across the street had an old old old table saw. It had a jointer on the other side of the table, that shared a motor with the saw.

Jointers have a smooth barrel with a sharp blade that isn't always visible at top dead center. As I stared at the smooth barrel and wondered how the heck it planes the edge of a board, I decided to touch it.

At the same time, neighbor fired up the table saw.

A hunk of my finger was soon dangling, and I bled a lot. I learned how a jointer works, and to stay away from it when the table saw is in use, and to respect power tools.

It scared the E36 M3 out of me, but I'm sure he felt worse than I did.

tr8todd
tr8todd Dork
Oct. 4, 2016 5:42 p.m.

A buddy of mine was working on a house he bought to flip. He was the only one in the house. He was pushing 2 2X4s together that were holding up a temporary staircase. One was twisted. Somehow he shot a large spike thru the back of his hand and into the 2 boards. Couldn't remove the nail or get his hand free. Stayed that way for several hours until the mailman heard him screaming. Worst I have ever done is a roofing nail in my inner thigh as I played the gun in my lap to grab another shingle. That wasn't too bad.

oldopelguy
oldopelguy UltraDork
Oct. 4, 2016 5:47 p.m.

I'll take a drill bit to the hand over the lawn mower any day.

chandlerGTi
chandlerGTi UberDork
Oct. 4, 2016 5:50 p.m.

I build custom hot wheels for people, while drilling the rivets out my son asked me a question....I looked up at the same time the bit went through the rivet and post AND body AND finger. Ouch

I once was holding a panel in a trade show booth while we made on site repairs and the guy on the other side used a 4" drywall screw instead of the 2" that would have sufficed, needless to say the oriental owners of the booth were more unintelligible than normal as they screamed at the screw out my hand and the copious amounts of blood. I was unhappy; I had to relaminate the panel on the show floor and that thing was throbbing pretty good after twenty minutes of so!

Rotaryracer
Rotaryracer New Reader
Oct. 4, 2016 6:06 p.m.

I just had to explain to my beautiful wife why I was crying so hard from laughing at "donketorium".

Best. Word. Ever.

Nick (Bo) Comstock
Oct. 4, 2016 6:25 p.m.

I have nailed my hand to a truss while standing on an eight foot ladder. Had to ask a helper to get me a claw hammer so I could free it. It went through the meat resting on the bone of my index finger. I then used my razor knife to slice the meat along the nail and pulled it out the side. At that point my helper fainted. I didn't really bleed much, wrapped it in duct tape and continued working. I would much rather that than drill into my hand.

Dusterbd13
Dusterbd13 PowerDork
Oct. 4, 2016 6:35 p.m.

I let my wife read this. It made her day. And she added a few more to my list of interesting injuries....

outasite
outasite Reader
Oct. 4, 2016 7:39 p.m.
DanielCut wrote: Can't you just reverse the drill?

Back in the days of long hair, a young mechanic was removing transmission bell housing bolts with a long extension and 1/2 inch impact gun. The air from the gun blew his hair into the rotating extension and had it wrapped tight with his head pulled close to the extension. Foreman heard him yelling, approached, surveyed the situation and suggested he reverse the gun. He did, pulled the trigger and ripped out hair and scalp about the size of 50 cent coin. Dumb and dumber!!

ProDarwin
ProDarwin PowerDork
Oct. 4, 2016 7:51 p.m.

Love that first post/article.

Toyman01 wrote: That damn 4" grinder on the other hand...

Dropped a 9" one spinning full tilt right into the meat of my thigh. Thank god my finger was off the trigger and my pants/flesh slowed it down before it got bone-deep.

dean1484
dean1484 MegaDork
Oct. 4, 2016 8:06 p.m.

Everytime I read the title of this thread I cringe. It I making me remember some very painful things.

JG Pasterjak
JG Pasterjak Production/Art Director
Oct. 4, 2016 8:16 p.m.
dean1484 wrote: Everytime I read the title of this thread I cringe. It I making me remember some very painful things.

If the title makes you cringe don't read any of the posts.

Jee-zus. Some of you people...

And I thought I was a fool for welding in Crocs.

Will
Will UltraDork
Oct. 4, 2016 8:24 p.m.

Many years ago, I was drilling something with a small, cordless Dremel tool. I dropped it. My first instinct was to grab it.

With lightning quick reflexes, I grabbed the falling Dremel. By the spinning drill bit.

Explaining what happened next takes longer than the actual process did. After a few revolutions, the drill bit had chewed into my hand enough to stop its rotation. Equal and opposite reactions and whatnot meant now the body of the dremel started spinning. I had to grab that with the other hand, and stopping it caused the drill bit to start spinning again.

That was a bad day.

Stefan (Not Bruce)
Oct. 4, 2016 8:34 p.m.
dean1484 wrote: Everytime I read the title of this thread I cringe. It I making me remember some very painful things.

Every time I read it, I hear Troy McLure's voice in my head.

dean1484
dean1484 MegaDork
Oct. 4, 2016 8:37 p.m.
JG Pasterjak wrote:
dean1484 wrote: Everytime I read the title of this thread I cringe. It I making me remember some very painful things.

If the title makes you cringe don't read any of the posts.

Jee-zus. Some of you people...

And I thought I was a fool for welding in Crocs.

Read some skimmed others. You work on stuff long enough and you get scars.

The funny part is some of the most painful ones are the least damaging while some of the more serious ones really did not hurt. Well they did not hurt immediately. Later on they hurt and did so for months or even years.

bentwrench
Oct. 4, 2016 9:12 p.m.

My hands are solid scar material, my scars have scars.

45+ years of abuse - stupidity.

My latest was a close encounter with a nail gun, the nail turned and nicked my thumb that was holding the piece in place. I was very lucky, the selector switch was on rock and roll and the next two nails were unintentionally delivered when the gun bucked, missed my hand. Nee Ner Nee Ner

Building my new yard shed provided additional entertainment when the 2' x 8' plywood I was ripping fell on my boot on edge, yes my foot was inside and the top of my foot is still black.

I always say "If I knew I was going to live this long, I would have taken better care of myself!"

Scars in my eyes, I even have a scar inside my ear, overhead welding a snolly when into my ear and sizzled away.

I once was teasing death when I assumed that the spring brakes applied when I dumped the air out of the air tank on a loaded dump truck I just towed, I realized there was another air tank holding the brakes released when the truck rolled off the blocks I had set it on and crushed me between it and the tow truck. Not my best day..... Rib damage and my foot turned black when blood from a minor leg hemorrhage settled there.

Toyman01
Toyman01 MegaDork
Oct. 4, 2016 9:22 p.m.
JG Pasterjak wrote:
dean1484 wrote: Everytime I read the title of this thread I cringe. It I making me remember some very painful things.

If the title makes you cringe don't read any of the posts.

Jee-zus. Some of you people...

And I thought I was a fool for welding in Crocs.

I can't imagine welding in crocks. That's just dangerous. Those things burn.

Always wear leather when welding.

ian @ Jewel Or Jalopy
Oct. 4, 2016 9:24 p.m.

In reply to Furious_E :

I was helping a contractor build our fence and when he went to pull the hose off his nail gun it shot him in the hip. He very calmly set down the gun and asked me to get his pliers. I handed them to him and he handed them right back and asked me to pull it out. Wasn't as bad as I thought it would be.

RevRico
RevRico Dork
Oct. 4, 2016 9:40 p.m.

The last time I ever operated a chainsaw without at least 1 beer in me, the chain stopped just breaking the skin of my left shin. Twice in the same day. It's been 11 years now, and I won't even start a chainsaw sober.

When trying to teach myself to stick weld, I turned the thin sticks into sparklers. That was fun, and my arms were covered in little blisters for what felt like ever.

I've come very close to drilling/screwing/nailing myself to things, but that hasn't happened. Yet. Although I did shatter the top knuckle of my left index finger building a greenhouse. That was fun. Took almost a year for the nail to get normal colored and thickness again, I still can't bend the joint the whole way.

penultimeta
penultimeta Reader
Oct. 5, 2016 7:58 a.m.

I've fortunately never had the pleasure of getting trapped behind a tool, but have freed several people from such situations. Please ya'll, do not remove the object. That'll just piss us medics off and make our reports longer be you'll be bleeding more and then the cranky ER charge nurse will yell at us and say "why did you remove the object?!!!??" And that'll make our day worse. Just leave the thing there. Please.

LanEvo
LanEvo Reader
Oct. 5, 2016 8:57 a.m.

Hey, JG. Sorry to hear about this. Have you found a good hand surgeon? I can send you a few recommendations by PM

(Yes, I'm a surgeon. And, yes, I once chopped off my own finger.)

GameboyRMH
GameboyRMH MegaDork
Oct. 5, 2016 9:23 a.m.

I haven't pierced myself or anything. Worst that happened to me is probably when super glue exploded into my eye. I probably did come close to cutting a finger off once when I tried to slot an uncut U-shaped bushing with a bigass knife and the knife slipped.

Oh also came close to stabbing myself in the hand with a bigass knife when cutting a hose from an engine.

Had a brand new dremel wheel explode in my face once, I was wearing safety glasses at least.

akylekoz
akylekoz Reader
Oct. 5, 2016 10:21 a.m.

Standing under a car, I was tightening a nut with a 1/2" ratchet rapidly to get past the loose threads when the socket slipped off of the nut. Unfortunately it was on a towards the face swing so I took a self inflicted full speed whack to the for head with a heavy blunt object. When the lights came back on I was half way to the floor. As I stood my friend who was watching just stared and said that I should go look in the mirror. Eventually I did to see what looked like a golf ball shoved under the skin of my forehead. Just a mild concussion and a black eye, no biggie.

JG Pasterjak
JG Pasterjak Production/Art Director
Oct. 5, 2016 10:29 a.m.
LanEvo wrote: Hey, JG. Sorry to hear about this. Have you found a good hand surgeon? I can send you a few recommendations by PM (Yes, I'm a surgeon. And, yes, I once chopped off my own finger.)

I hope that didn't happen in the operating room. Or, maybe that would be better? For you, anyway.

But, no, I've never actually drilled through my hand. Although one time I was pulling my socks on and my hand slipped off and I punched myself in the nuts.

LanEvo
LanEvo Reader
Oct. 5, 2016 10:42 a.m.
JG Pasterjak wrote: I hope that didn't happen in the operating room. Or, maybe that would be better? For you, anyway.

Better for me (worker's comp?) but definitely worse for the patient. I've been poked, stabbed, and cut in the OR more than once by young residents I was training. But my finger-chopping happened in the kitchen.

JG Pasterjak wrote: But, no, I've never actually drilled through my hand.

Wow. Looks like my comedy detector needs a rebuild. Glad to hear you're ok!

kb58
kb58 Dork
Oct. 5, 2016 11:02 a.m.
JG Pasterjak wrote: Although one time I was pulling my socks on and my hand slipped off and I punched myself in the nuts.

Thanks... reaching for paper towel to clean up coffee spewed from nose.

kb58
kb58 Dork
Oct. 5, 2016 11:06 a.m.

Can't resist a thread which should be titled, "I'm stupider than you."

When I was a teenager I had a chemistry set and one day I was twisting a glass tube into a rubber cork (to plug into a flask). When I heard it snap I instantly knew it was trouble. Right into my finger at the joint and to this day I can't feel anything in one area of my middle finger.

kb58
kb58 Dork
Oct. 5, 2016 11:09 a.m.

Was using a fly cutter to cut a big round hole in a piece of sheet metal. I don't remember the exact setup but it wasn't right and that fly cutter came around right across my hand. Yeah there was a lot of blood but I got off really lucky, as that could have been Much worse.

kb58
kb58 Dork
Oct. 5, 2016 11:15 a.m.

When I was a kid, I figured out how to sharpen knives using the handheld sharpener a lot of kitchens have, the one with intermixed hardened washers. I was going to town sharpening a knife when something happened that taught me to not extend my thumb along the base of the sharpener. Still have the scar from that and no, I didn't quite remove the upper quarter inch of my thumb.

Anyone feeling a bit faint yet?

Nick (Bo) Comstock
Oct. 5, 2016 11:21 a.m.

I completely flattened my left index finger while driving a stake in the ground with a 20# sledge hammer. Squashed it like a grape. Finger still works fine, no corrective action needed.

kb58
kb58 Dork
Oct. 5, 2016 11:24 a.m.

Was wearing a full-face mask while cutting metal on the band saw. You know how your brain can see things far faster than you know you can react? I watched a cut-off bit of metal come straight at my eye really fast before going "TICK!" off the mask. It was an awesome safety lesson because I received the education without the high tuition.

bluej
bluej UltraDork
Oct. 5, 2016 12:03 p.m.
JG Pasterjak wrote: Although one time I was pulling my socks on and my hand slipped off and I punched myself in the nuts.

Would it be fair to call that a Code-Blue to go along with your Code-Brown system?

akylekoz
akylekoz Reader
Oct. 5, 2016 2:12 p.m.

New years eve 1999. I kicked the foot petal away from the drill press, then apparently took a step exactly in the same direction. I reached to change the belt speed my foot triggered the switch. Hearing the motor start I quickly pulled my finger from the spinning pulleys. At first glance everything appeared normal, then blood started to appear where my fingernail used to be. They told me I did a great job removing it. They fished around under my cuticle with a miniature spoon looking for the rest of it. If I had not pulled the entire nail out they would have had to finish the job.

kb58
kb58 Dork
Oct. 5, 2016 2:35 p.m.

I don't feel so good, so I'll have to top that, one of those "friend of a friend" ones, so who knows.

So this guy works in a two-story building which is mostly open to the area below. One day he decides to impress people by jumping over the railing and landing part way down the stairs. That would have been fine had his wedding ring not caught on the screw on a conduit coupler right at the top of the railing. He landed fine and looked up to see about 2" of his wedding finger, still attached to about a foot of tendon. Yeah I didn't feel good after that story either.

The roundabout moral of the story: no rings, watches, or gloves around moving equipment.

GameboyRMH
GameboyRMH MegaDork
Oct. 5, 2016 2:56 p.m.
kb58 wrote: I don't feel so good, so I'll have to top that, one of those "friend of a friend" ones, so who knows. So this guy works in a two-story building which mostly open to the area below. One day he decides to impress people by jumping over the railing and landing part way down the stairs. That would have been fine had his wedding ring not caught on the screw on a conduit coupler right at the top of the railing. He landed fine and looked up to see about 2" of his wedding finger, still attached to about a foot of tendon. Yeah I didn't feel good after that story either. The roundabout moral of the story: no rings, watches, or gloves around moving equipment.

Heard a similar one to this from my uncle. Young guy just married, doing some wiring job for IBM involving running wires across a wall with a ladder...can't remember all the details, but basically he came off the ladder, wedding ring got caught on some mounting hardware on the wall, and off goes the finger.

92dxman
92dxman SuperDork
Oct. 5, 2016 3:20 p.m.

I used to work as a vendor for a manufacturer that involved building sample displays in Lowes Depot stores and i've dropped fence panels on my feet, wacked myself with a mallet, twisted my work gloves in the chuck of my cordless drill. Probably child's play compared to some of you guys

Stefan (Not Bruce)
Oct. 5, 2016 6:09 p.m.

Wow. Just wow.

As far as berkeley ups go, this one was pretty bad.

jimbbski
jimbbski Dork
Oct. 5, 2016 6:57 p.m.

I was using a 6X48 belt sander and the belt grabbed the piece I was sanding and pinned my two index finger between it and the moving belt. My right finger recovered almost 100% but my left is about a 1/4 inch shorter

RexSeven
RexSeven UberDork
Oct. 5, 2016 7:20 p.m.

RealMiniParker
RealMiniParker UberDork
Oct. 5, 2016 10:26 p.m.
JG Pasterjak wrote: Although one time I was pulling my socks on and my hand slipped off and I punched myself in the nuts.

Dude, how berking high and tight do you pull up your socks?

evildky
evildky SuperDork
Oct. 6, 2016 10:27 a.m.

Alright, my top 3 self inflicted injuries:

  1. Impaled myself with a BarBECUE fork (in the leg, walked into it, just a few stitches as the cuts were deep but narrow)

  2. Burnt my hand with an oxyacetylene torch (building a challenge car no less, second degree burns)

  3. As most fo the staff is aware as well as many fellow challengers, I cut my face open with a chainsaw (long story, all better now, had a great plastic surgeon)  photo IMG_1178.jpg

Spoolpigeon
Spoolpigeon PowerDork
Oct. 6, 2016 11:17 a.m.

evildky's face today:

You can see his plastic surgeon did a wonderful job getting him back to his former likeness.

KyAllroad
KyAllroad UberDork
Oct. 6, 2016 11:55 a.m.

This whole thread makes me a bit queasy. As an Army Medic and then as an ER CNA, I've seen a ton of "stuff", it's my imagination that's better these days. I can much more easily imagine so many of these injuries happening to myself (or my kid). As I get older, each fresh new hurt takes longer to heal and the lingering effects are more noticeable.

CLNSC3
CLNSC3 HalfDork
Oct. 8, 2016 5:53 a.m.

Hahaha I was making a pressure bleeder a few month's ago and drilled deep into my palm with a brand new large drill bit. Fresh out of first aid supplies i wrapped a microfiber towel around my hand, zip tied it and drove to the store. After taking pics of course. It was disgusting there was fat coming out of the hole after i got it cleaned up.

RevRico
RevRico Dork
Oct. 8, 2016 7:02 a.m.
CLNSC3 wrote: It was disgusting there was fat coming out of the hole after i got it cleaned up.

Still have the scar on my finger from an archery accident ~15 years ago, same thing though, you could see to the bone and had fat cells coming out

bentwrench
Oct. 8, 2016 11:09 a.m.
akylekoz wrote: New years eve 1999. I kicked the foot petal away from the drill press, then apparently took a step exactly in the same direction. I reached to change the belt speed my foot triggered the switch. Hearing the motor start I quickly pulled my finger from the spinning pulleys. At first glance everything appeared normal, then blood started to appear where my fingernail used to be. They told me I did a great job removing it. They fished around under my cuticle with a miniature spoon looking for the rest of it. If I had not pulled the entire nail out they would have had to finish the job.

Funny how it doesn't hurt till you see the blood!

fasted58
fasted58 UltimaDork
Oct. 8, 2016 11:14 a.m.

SCCA liked the article too, they posted the GRM link on their FB page.

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The Nissan Armada is the brand's largest non-commercial vehicle and is a direct competitor to Chevy's Suburban and Ford's Expedition. ...

Tech Tips: 2015+ Ford Mustang

3 days ago in Articles

How to make it your way.

Speciality Insurance for Our Special M3?

4 days ago in Project Cars

Can you save 15% or more with Hagerty?

First Drive: 2017 Subaru BRZ Performance Package

5 days ago in Articles

We’ve heard it before: The Subaru BRZ doesn’t make enough horsepower.

10 Cars to Buy Now

5 days ago in News

Hagerty recently announced the top 10 classic cars to buy in 2017.

Reader's Ride of the Week: Cone-Killing Camaro

5 days ago in News

This one's a work in progress, but we can't wait to see the finished product.

Get Our Magazine in Print and Digital for just $17.99

5 days ago in News

Now is a great time to renew or start subscribing to our magazine.

Treading on Thick Ice

6 days ago in News

How do you improve your car control in the racing off season?

Strap In

1 week ago in Articles

Is your racing harness installed correctly?

2017 Volvo XC90 T6 AWD Inscription

1 week ago in New Car Reviews

Volvo's XC90 is the manufacturer's luxury SUV and this—the T6 Inscription—represents the highest tier of that model. And to triple ...

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