1 2 3 4 ... 6
rico750sxi_2
rico750sxi_2 New Reader
1/26/18 6:54 p.m.

I’ll be watching for updates, very interesting. 

Agent98
Agent98 Reader
1/26/18 7:39 p.m.

Just one more thought  - the main source of retained water in the interior will likely be those seat foams. Maybe it is worth it to:

1.Remove the seat covers pull the foams and dry them out -or -

2.Get new foams from a wrecked car that had never seen water. Maybe the seat covers are ripped on that set who cares you only want foam set that has no mildew spores etc locked inside.

AAZCD
AAZCD New Reader
1/26/18 10:58 p.m.

"Just curious... what part of Oklahoma? "

  • Northeastern, about 50 miles east of Tulsa, in the Cherokee lands.

"Also we need a build thread on the V8 Boxster! "

  • It's a stop-and-go project. I get mad at it sometimes. When that V8 roars to life, I'll start the thread.

"One question: how easy is it to reregister a car formerly stamped "salvage" or "flood" in your state? "

  • In Oklahoma, for a car over 10 years old that is salvage and not branded as "Parts Only", you just need to show a receipt for the repairs. There is no emissions or safety inspection in the state.

"how did the driver know your home address? "

  • The address wasn't on the 'Bill of Lading', but it was my billing address. He must have gotten it off the original shipping order.

"...the main source of retained water in the interior will likely be those seat foams. Maybe it is worth it to: ... "

  • Good point, but the seats seem to have dried very well. I had a Toyota Tercel years ago that I ended up scrapping because I couldn't get rid of a moldy smell (and because it was a Toyota Tercel). The carpet padding in these cars is about an inch thick of foam and it will hold water forever. The carpet NEEDS to be removed and left in the sun, or warm dry air.
AAZCD
AAZCD New Reader
1/26/18 11:07 p.m.

Water and Electricity

Wet circuit boards will corrode slowly. Wet circuit boards with power applied will corrode quickly and eat the connectors (galvanic corrosion).

I pulled out some electronics for inspection and cleaning. Of all the electronics in the car, one part that is almost certainly in need replacement in a flooded Boxster is the immobilizer box under the driver's seat. These cars need to have matching programming for the transponder in the key fob, the immobilizer box, and the ECU. Even if the immobilizer box was good, the odds of finding a matching key stashed somewhere in the car are on par with finding a talking unicorn in my back yard. Knowing this before the car even arrived, I did a Google search of the part number and found this:

Unbelievable... one on eBay from an '04 S SE with 3 keys, for under $500 shipped. No worries of repairing my set or flashing a Special Edition tune to another ECU. This should work. ...hopefully the rest of the car will eventually work too.

The Stereo/amp/CD player are beyond repair. I'm really hoping that a French Canadian friend in China shows back up online soon with a new toy for me to buy: Infotainment System for Porsche Car [from CAD, prototyping to finish]
That is what I want in this car. Better than OEM.

I think that the switches are all going to be fine, but I'm going to replace the ignition switch and headlight switch since I already have spares on hand. Why take a chance.
I am going to take a chance on the Convertible Top relay. It looks good and it's easy to replace if it goes bad. About half the other relays looked bad internally, so they are All going in the trash. I pulled all of the fuses and cleaned out the holder. Many had signs of corrosion. Hunting down intermittent electrical problems can suck. Why take a chance... They are all in the trash.

Fuse Holder, then Bad Relays:



The climate control unit was surprisingly good. Just some very light signs of water that I cleaned off with industrial strength alcohol and electronics cleaner. There's still a chance that the LCD screen is bad, but hoping for the best.

Before Cleaning:

AAZCD
AAZCD New Reader
1/26/18 11:18 p.m.

Replacing the Steering Lock and Ignition Tumbler

Buying a car without a key presents a challenge. You can lock it, but you can't unlock it. You can not start it. In this case, the immobilizer/central locking unit module under the driver's seat, was corroded so badly that even if the car had a key, it would not have functioned. I did try cleaning it, just to see how it would come out, and had some small components fall off as i lightly scrubbed it. The set that I purchased on eBay arrived, so now the issue was how to get the old tumbler and steering lock out.

Remove the side vent and headlight switch.
Disconnect all the wires from the ignition and steering lock.
Removing the tumbler: Pull out the rubber surrounding the ignition tumbler, then use a chisel to bend and crack the soft cast aluminum that holds the tumbler. Eventually you will be able to pull it out.
Remove the steering wheel: If the steering wheel is locked, you should now be able to push in and turn the ignition with a screwdriver to unlock the steering. Fully loosen the 2 captive screws that hold the airbag and remove it. Disconnect wires. Mark the steering wheel and shaft so that you can reinstall it in the correct position. (24 mm nut and washer.)

Remove the rest of the stuff that's in the way of the steering column. (Small screws and gently prying.)
Remove the bolt that holds the steering lock (10 mm) and the screw for the bracket over the ignition switch.
Push the release button on the steering column where the steering lock connects. It should easily depress if the steering is unlocked. Slide the steering lock out.
Reverse the steps to install the new one.

In my car the release button wouldn't move. Something was stuck. I tried various combinations of screwdrivers, rods, and hammers. Nothing worked and at one point I bumped the windshield with the back of the hammer. As a last resort, I decided to drill out the button. When I started drilling, the button popped down and the steering lock started to slide out. The drill must have scared it more than the hammer.
Installation was easy.

yupididit
yupididit SuperDork
1/26/18 11:31 p.m.

I think I've seen you post on planet-9.

Anyway, I'm sure you already know about this guy. But, there's a guy not to far from me  down here in Texas that deals boxster parts. He has like 50 of them. 

Woodys Parts LLC

In regards to the 4.2 swap. The 4.2 bolts up to the tranny right? 

mrap1000
mrap1000 New Reader
1/27/18 6:08 a.m.

Welcome.  Glad to see another Boxster thread on this board.  With a free-turning engine and no metal in the oil, that looks like a net-positive should you decide to part it out.

I'm sitting back with a bowl of popcorn to watch this one.  Can't wait to see how it turns out!

Pete Gossett
Pete Gossett MegaDork
1/27/18 6:21 a.m.

In reply to AAZCD :

It sounds like you have a good stash of spares. Are you planning to proactively replace any of the wiring harnesses while the car is apart?

Patrick
Patrick MegaDork
1/27/18 7:35 a.m.
Pete Gossett said:

In reply to AAZCD :

It sounds like you have a good stash of spares. Are you planning to proactively replace any of the wiring harnesses while the car is apart?

Was thinking same.  Water wicks into wires like rope.  If it was salt water i’d be ripping the harnesses out entirely and starting from a “body in white” point. If it works now, chances are stuff will start failing down the road.  Had that happen to a car, fresh water up to hood.  Dried out, drained crankcase, replaced seats and carpet.  Worked fine for a few years then electrical gremlins started popping up one by one.  Some wires pulled from their connectors by looking at them wrong, and most were green inside their insulation.

AAZCD
AAZCD New Reader
1/27/18 1:58 p.m.

There shouldn't be any salt water exposure on this one. If I though there was, I'd probably just be parting it out. Using the info on the title, I located the address where the car resided at. It is a neighborhood that was flooded by the intentional release of a fresh water reservoir:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2017/national/harvey-flood/?utm_term=.04e9a0176256

http://abcnews.go.com/US/video/hurricane-harvey-damages-home-texas-49433722

My main concern for the harness is portions that are "Hot at all times" and ground lines from modules that were powered. I have a complete, intact harness from an '01 that I will probably pull some runs from, but so far I think I will be replacing pins on connectors and splicing back into the harness, rather than large portions of the wiring. If the whole system is compromised, I'd probably be better off swapping the good parts of this car into another. Clean Boxsters with a blown engine can be found for $3,000 to $4,000 (I bought a '99 with an overheated engine for under $2,000). That would be a last resort.

AAZCD
AAZCD New Reader
1/27/18 2:11 p.m.

In reply to yupididit :

Yes, I know Woody. I still haven't made it to his place, but may head down there with a trailer some day. Great guy.

I often read P9, but mostly post on the 986forum.com and some VW & Audi forums.

The Audi 4.2 belt driven engines: 32 Valve ABZ, and 40 Valve ART, AUX, AWN... bolt to the 986 Boxster 5-speed transmission, but need to be adapted for the starter location on the 6-speed. The 987 6-speed will work. Then it gets into spacers depending on the flywheel and clutch. Then there's making the shift linkage reach.... Not quite a bolt in job.

Run_Away
Run_Away HalfDork
1/27/18 2:12 p.m.

Following along!

This should be an interesting journey. I take it you're keeping the car? I'm interested in seeing if you have any issues long term.

 

Also, very interested in the V8 Boxster project as well!

MazdaFace
MazdaFace HalfDork
1/27/18 2:34 p.m.

excited to follow this thread. You sir are a brave man

yupididit
yupididit SuperDork
1/27/18 3:48 p.m.
AAZCD said:

In reply to yupididit :

Yes, I know Woody. I still haven't made it to his place, but may head down there with a trailer some day. Great guy.

I often read P9, but mostly post on the 986forum.com and some VW & Audi forums.

The Audi 4.2 belt driven engines: 32 Valve ABZ, and 40 Valve ART, AUX, AWN... bolt to the 986 Boxster 5-speed transmission, but need to be adapted for the starter location on the 6-speed. The 987 6-speed will work. Then it gets into spacers depending on the flywheel and clutch. Then there's making the shift linkage reach.... Not quite a bolt in job.

 

I'm following a few threads with 4.2 swaps. It looks like a fun swap! 

If you ever need me to pick up and hold onto anything large from woody, just pm me. I have a large storage unit that can fit 3 cars. I have a truck, trailer, and winch as well. And woody is pretty close. 

Just offering a little GRM hospitality. 

Dirtydog
Dirtydog Reader
1/27/18 6:04 p.m.

I truly believe you can make a mountain out of this mole hill.  Good luck on this endeavor.

AAZCD
AAZCD New Reader
1/27/18 10:34 p.m.

Dry Gas, Wet Speakers

I put in a little time today and checked the transmission and gas tank for water, cleaned some wiring harness connectors, and drained water from the door speakers.

I checked the transmission by first opening the fill plug, verifying the level was good and that there was indeed oil in there. Then I carefully unscrewed the drain plug enough to get a slight bit of oil seeping out. I didn't want to do a full drain and flush yet – I still need to buy the Porsche brand replacement gear oil.

To check the gas tank, I powered the fuel pump directly from a 12 volt battery and used a salvaged hose to sample the fuel.

The door speakers looked good, but I heard water sloshing around when I opened the doors. These Bose speakers have a large plastic acoustic chamber and they were both filled with water.

I have been feeling that I really need to get this running, then follow up with the rest.
Revised plan:
Monday:

  • Put it back together with lots of substitute (known good) parts.

  • Carefully power everything essential back up, one fuse at a time: https://youtu.be/EFu6Q8T_gvo

  • Start the engine and idle for 10 minutes.

  • Check for problems, pull oil filter cup and examine.

  • Put some seats in and bolt an exhaust back on.

Tuesday:

  • Drive a mile to the Tag Agency (Local DMV), show them some receipts for parts and file for a 'rebuilt title'.

  • Drive home and start taking it all back apart.

The0retical
The0retical SuperDork
1/28/18 9:11 a.m.

Wow this should be fun to watch. Flood damaged cars tend to be where I draw the line. I can understand the desire to save this one though.

AAZCD
AAZCD New Reader
1/28/18 10:04 p.m.

Not much progress today, as it should be. A little break is good. Tomorrow should be a busy day working on the car.
Installing the coils:
 

 

AAZCD
AAZCD New Reader
1/29/18 11:09 p.m.

First Start

I started the car today and ran it for a short time. I wanted to run it longer, but the radiator leak is more severe than I expected. I have a repaired radiator to put in temporarily while I wait for a new one to arrive. I tried to install it for another run, but it was dark before I was done.


On this first run, the O2 sensors were still removed and header was unbolted behind the cat. Lots of oily, wet mess still in the exhaust system. I don't want to put it in the garage until The exhaust is cleared out. Not sure if I'm going to drive it on the road tomorrow. Lots to accomplish still.

dculberson
dculberson UltimaDork
1/30/18 9:19 a.m.

IT LIVES! Amazing.

pres589
pres589 PowerDork
1/30/18 9:25 a.m.

You're moving through this project at a really impressive rate.  Congrats on running the engine.

Dirtydog
Dirtydog Reader
1/30/18 9:47 a.m.

Good for you.  I'm amazed also.  It helps when you have supportive camera crew.

AWSX1686
AWSX1686 Dork
1/30/18 10:14 a.m.

Awesome. This is the type of thing I would do if I had more time and money. Some might question the rationale of reviving a flood car, but I suspect you see it as a challenge you are going to overcome, and from what we're seeing so far, I think you'll overcome!

dherr
dherr Reader
1/30/18 11:03 a.m.

Yes, this is quite a project, as I have looked at older flood cars, but not one as complex as a Porsche. I was watching a flooded Triumph TR3B which I knew I could flip for a big profit as it was a restored car that got flooded, so much easier to "re-restore" than a rusted out old one and no electronics! If it had been closer, I would have bought it, but what you are doing is so much more of a challenge. If it were a normal Boxster, I might question why, but that is a special model and well worth saving. 

Gunchsta
Gunchsta Reader
1/30/18 1:30 p.m.

I generally avoid salvage titles, let alone specifically buying a flood car. I commend your optimism and it sounds like you have the skills and parts on hand to make this feasible. 

 

Heck the fact that it's already running is extremely impressive! I am under the impression that you have the money to afford this car in pristine condition but chose the challenge over the check writing. I'm excited to see how the rest of this revitalization turns out! 

1 2 3 4 ... 6
Our Preferred Partners
CWLgW19PiNJow9aHeIEWO4g91ETqxtjUe3IfBvn8PCddOdYGk4VKXTLzEMxEUAYD