Tim Suddard
Tim Suddard Publisher
8/3/18 3:02 p.m.


This story ran in an old issue of Classic Motorsports. Want to make sure you're reading all the latest stories? Subscribe now.


Story and Photos by Tim Suddard • Illustrations by Sarah Young

Back in the day, it was relatively easy to sell a car: You placed an ad and waited for the phone to ring. Today the process is a lot more complicated, especially if you’re trying to cast the widest possible net to get the highest possible sale price.

Fortunately we have some experience in this area, so when this 1965 Sunbeam Tiger fell into our lap, we saw an opportunity—actually, several of them.

This was a dirty car filled with garbage and packed into a cramped, dark garage. It looked so unappealing that we knew we could buy it on the cheap, and we did. First opportunity realized.

Next we wanted to clean it up and get it running for a quick sale. That proved relatively cheap and easy.

Now we were ready to attain our final goal: selling our Tiger for a profit. A couple of bucks and a bit of time translated into a nice little monetary gain while putting a cool classic back in circulation. Here’s how we did it.

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RustBeltSherpa
RustBeltSherpa New Reader
8/7/18 7:01 p.m.

I've been following this series of articles intently since it started earlier this year. Question: "Considering that we had less than $10,000...", so you got the Tiger AND the MG for less than 10 grand? Takeaways: 1) If you offer to buy multiple vehicles, you have greater bargaining leverage.  2) Affluent residential/resort areas (e.g.Traverse City, Mich.  area, Highlands, N.C area). may be prime areas to find undervalued classics  for sale.

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