LanEvo
LanEvo HalfDork
12/2/17 9:11 p.m.

The TR6 project is under way. Had a local MG/Triumph specialist take care of the body work: replacing floors, repairing sills, and such. As someone with zero fabrication or welding skills, I knew that would be too much for me to take on.

But I’m considering giving the engine a go. The engine starts and runs, but it’s rough and doesn’t make good oil pressure. The shop tells me it needs a new oil pump and valve lifters for sure. I’ve ordered all the parts from Moss Motors, including tappets, valve adjusters, gaskets, and all the associated “while you’re in there” type stuff.

I’ve got mediocre mechanical skills. Can do work on brakes, suspension, cooling system, valve adjustment, and other straightforward jobs. I’ve got good hand tools, jacks/stands, some power tools (impact gun, drills, etc). Nothing too fancy: the kind of stuff you’d bring to the track. 

How would I approach something like this? 

rustyvw
rustyvw Dork
12/2/17 9:20 p.m.

Start with a good shop manual, not the Chilton's manual.  I bet if you search on youtube, you will find several videos of people doing the same rebuild.  Just take your time and double check everything and you'll be fine.

 

frenchyd
frenchyd Dork
12/3/17 1:09 a.m.

In reply to LanEvo :

Start out with a careful cleaning of everything.  Parts like the block heads etc need first the grubby cleaning. Knock out core plugs, pressure wash water passageways. Oil passageways.  

Hone the bores or have them bored oversize and then hone.  Now wash everything with warm soapy water then quickly dry things off.  The bores must be washed and then oiled and bare metal oiled at this stage.  

Surfaces should be carefully checked to be flat and dealt with if they are off.   Once everything is spic and span seal them in new plastic bags  

 

 

LanEvo
LanEvo HalfDork
12/3/17 9:50 a.m.
rustyvw said:

Start with a good shop manual, not the Chilton's manual.

I bought the Triumph factory service manual (the "red book") and the big British Leyland/Bentley manual (the "blue book"), which are supposed to be the best resources. I'm just a little intimidated. Would definitely prefer to see more photos or a video. Haven't come across anything as detailed as I would like.

Not really a surprise, since the Intarwebs wasn't yet a twinkle in Al Gore's eye at the time these cars were milling around.

 

frenchyd said:

Start out with a careful cleaning of everything.  Parts like the block heads etc need first the grubby cleaning. Knock out core plugs, pressure wash water passageways. Oil passageways.  

Hone the bores or have them bored oversize and then hone.  Now wash everything with warm soapy water then quickly dry things off.  The bores must be washed and then oiled and bare metal oiled at this stage.  

Surfaces should be carefully checked to be flat and dealt with if they are off.   Once everything is spic and span seal them in new plastic bags

So, I was thinking more in terms of:

  1. Drop the pan and replace the oil pump and screen
  2. Keep the block in place
  3. Do whatever I can from the top

Based on what my mechanic says, I should be able to do the work without removing the engine. A complete rebuild is out of the quesiton at this time due to lack of shop space, tools, and time/skills.

TR7
TR7 Reader
12/3/17 10:41 a.m.

These motors are really easy to work on and you shouldn't need more than hand tools. As for the low oil pressure, I would suspect bearings might be something to check before attacking it with a new oil pump and other parts. The valvetrain might just need to be adjusted back to spec. It would certainly be worth trying before taking everything apart, especially if you just plan to refresh the block in place.

frenchyd
frenchyd Dork
12/3/17 4:34 p.m.
LanEvo said:
rustyvw said:

Start with a good shop manual, not the Chilton's manual.

I bought the Triumph factory service manual (the "red book") and the big British Leyland/Bentley manual (the "blue book"), which are supposed to be the best resources. I'm just a little intimidated. Would definitely prefer to see more photos or a video. Haven't come across anything as detailed as I would like.

Not really a surprise, since the Intarwebs wasn't yet a twinkle in Al Gore's eye at the time these cars were milling around.

 

frenchyd said:

Start out with a careful cleaning of everything.  Parts like the block heads etc need first the grubby cleaning. Knock out core plugs, pressure wash water passageways. Oil passageways.  

Hone the bores or have them bored oversize and then hone.  Now wash everything with warm soapy water then quickly dry things off.  The bores must be washed and then oiled and bare metal oiled at this stage.  

Surfaces should be carefully checked to be flat and dealt with if they are off.   Once everything is spic and span seal them in new plastic bags

So, I was thinking more in terms of:

  1. Drop the pan and replace the oil pump and screen
  2. Keep the block in place
  3. Do whatever I can from the top

Based on what my mechanic says, I should be able to do the work without removing the engine. A complete rebuild is out of the quesiton at this time due to lack of shop space, tools, and time/skills.

Your idea has merit right up to the camshaft. A lot of older camshafts have lost their lobes due to modern oils and catalytic converters reaction  the changed oil formulations .  Zinc  Dialkyl Dithio Phosphate (ZDDP ) is lacking in oils since the late 1970s 

Before going too far, one by one check out your lifters.  If they are concave or have rings on the wear surface you will need new lifters and a new camshaft. Chances are real good the timing chain has stretched and the sprockets are worn excessively too

 

ggarrard
ggarrard Reader
12/3/17 9:58 p.m.

I think your idea of changing the oil pump and screen to see if the oil pressure improves has merit.  At worst, if the bearings need to be replaced it’s only cost an extra pan gasket and time.     Replacing the lifters is not a difficult chore, and if you follow the manual you should have no problems.

Finding somebody in the local Triumph community who could provide some guidance would be beneficial but trusting the manual and taking your time should work just fine.

Enjoy the learning experience and have fun.

Cheers

Gordon 

frenchyd
frenchyd Dork
12/3/17 11:01 p.m.

In reply to ggarrard : you cannot just replace lifters.  If the lobes are damaged due to lack of ZDDP new lifters will quickly be ruined.  It’s new camshaft, timing chain, sprockets and lifters.  Then look very carefully at rocker arms.  

In the 1980s almost every pushrod engine went to roller lifters in order to deal with a lack of ZDDP  in modern oil blends.  

While you could then and still can buy special oils to deal with those issues it’s not easily found.  Odds are good regular oil was used.  

 

Our Preferred Partners
NqwT4dMa69939BmZQJ1BZT1DPmXz8ttJ