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SeanC
SeanC New Reader
7/2/15 7:15 a.m.

Yeah, looks good to me!

Appleseed
Appleseed MegaDork
7/2/15 7:46 a.m.

It can be undone if nessesary. That car is far from ruined.

84FSP
84FSP Reader
7/2/15 8:09 a.m.

I'm a fan despite the controversy. From the looks of it an exceedingly professional swap and didn't slip into any of standard pitfalls of CNC fooooooozzzzee wheels.

Keith Tanner
Keith Tanner MegaDork
7/2/15 9:04 a.m.
NOHOME wrote: The handicap plate made me laugh. As to hot-rodding classic cars? Hell Yes! Takes a stunted imagination to value an original car if there was more than one made.

I'm pretty sure Piech would approve of this swap.

As for the handicap plate - one of the fastest drivers who used to race with our local group wasn't a healthy guy. He drove a rally blue WRX STi on slicks. With a handicap plate. And he'd drive the wheels off that chariot.

Cotton
Cotton UberDork
7/2/15 9:13 a.m.
NOHOME wrote: The handicap plate made me laugh. As to hot-rodding classic cars? Hell Yes! Takes a stunted imagination to value an original car if there was more than one made.

So you're basically a mental midget if you enjoy a nice original classic, unless it's one of one? Sorry but I've seen way too many hacked up "modified" cars from owners with "imagination" to make a statement like that.

I do think the car in this thread is well done, but so many aren't. I like original and modified cars, but when I decide I want to go deep into modification I generally start with a rough example. For instance, I have a nice original 78 Trans Am that's going to stay that way, but when I decided I wanted to get pretty heavy into mods on one I bought a rough 72 that had been drive train swapped, painted multiple times, etc. That's just how I do it....ymmv.

Fueled by Caffeine
Fueled by Caffeine MegaDork
7/2/15 9:27 a.m.

perfect daily driver for me. Just a gorgeous car.

oldtin
oldtin UberDork
7/2/15 9:30 a.m.

There's no shortage of minty 911s from any year. The flat six from this period was known for some issues. So not like he's ruining a one of a kind thing. It's just an economics thing. As far as cost. A crate LS and installation wouldn't necessarily be cheaper than a rebuild for a flat six.

I love it. Would prefer a duck tail spoiler. Long hoods look better, but I dunno if i'd bother.

NOHOME
NOHOME UberDork
7/2/15 10:23 a.m.
Cotton wrote:
NOHOME wrote: The handicap plate made me laugh. As to hot-rodding classic cars? Hell Yes! Takes a stunted imagination to value an original car if there was more than one made.

So you're basically a mental midget if you enjoy a nice original classic, unless it's one of one? Sorry but I've seen way too many hacked up "modified" cars from owners with "imagination" to make a statement like that.

I do think the car in this thread is well done, but so many aren't. I like original and modified cars, but when I decide I want to go deep into modification I generally start with a rough example. For instance, I have a nice original 78 Trans Am that's going to stay that way, but when I decided I wanted to get pretty heavy into mods on one I bought a rough 72 that had been drive train swapped, painted multiple times, etc. That's just how I do it....ymmv.

I did not call anyone a mental midget, you did.

I said that it takes no imagination to own or restore a classic car. If you bought it as a finished car, you are just following in the footsteps of others who sold you on its value. If you restore it, you may demonstrate awesome mechanical skills, but ultimately, you are just following the instruction manual and assembling someone else's design; no different than a paint by numbers Mona-lisa.

If you set out to create your own vision, regardless of outcome, you tried something new. You become a creator. The project does not have to turn out a masterpiece. In fact, failure is perfectly acceptable and most likely. Chances are you will come out the other end wiser than when you started.

Another point we will disagree on is starting with a rough car: I see no point in having to fight rust if I do not have to. If I start with a good car I will need to shop for fewer parts and also have more parts to sell off and fund the project. If the donor car has paint that can be salvaged, then so much the better. Same with Hot-Rods, there are plenty of restored original cars that are going unloved by the people who inherit them. Might as well take advantage of the head-start they offer.

Joe Gearin
Joe Gearin Associate Publisher
7/2/15 10:23 a.m.

What a sleeper! I love it. The mid-70's cars were the least desirable of all 911s, so I don't see anything wrong with this swap. There are plenty of stock ones around for the purists to enjoy. I'd totally rock this! I even love the color.

oldtin
oldtin UberDork
7/2/15 10:27 a.m.

btw - not all a/c 911 prices are out of control: BaT - auction - at $7,000 no reserve

Cotton
Cotton UberDork
7/2/15 10:41 a.m.
oldtin wrote: btw - not all a/c 911 prices are out of control: BaT - auction - at $7,000 no reserve

Will be interesting to check back in 6 days.

Cotton
Cotton UberDork
7/2/15 10:49 a.m.
NOHOME wrote:
Cotton wrote:
NOHOME wrote: The handicap plate made me laugh. As to hot-rodding classic cars? Hell Yes! Takes a stunted imagination to value an original car if there was more than one made.

So you're basically a mental midget if you enjoy a nice original classic, unless it's one of one? Sorry but I've seen way too many hacked up "modified" cars from owners with "imagination" to make a statement like that.

I do think the car in this thread is well done, but so many aren't. I like original and modified cars, but when I decide I want to go deep into modification I generally start with a rough example. For instance, I have a nice original 78 Trans Am that's going to stay that way, but when I decided I wanted to get pretty heavy into mods on one I bought a rough 72 that had been drive train swapped, painted multiple times, etc. That's just how I do it....ymmv.

I did not call anyone a mental midget, you did.

I said that it takes no imagination to own or restore a classic car. If you bought it as a finished car, you are just following in the footsteps of others who sold you on its value. If you restore it, you may demonstrate awesome mechanical skills, but ultimately, you are just following the instruction manual and assembling someone else's design; no different than a paint by numbers Mona-lisa.

If you set out to create your own vision, regardless of outcome, you tried something new. You become a creator. The project does not have to turn out a masterpiece. In fact, failure is perfectly acceptable and most likely. Chances are you will come out the other end wiser than when you started.

Another point we will disagree on is starting with a rough car: I see no point in having to fight rust if I do not have to. If I start with a good car I will need to shop for fewer parts and also have more parts to sell off and fund the project. If the donor car has paint that can be salvaged, then so much the better. Same with Hot-Rods, there are plenty of restored original cars that are going unloved by the people who inherit them. Might as well take advantage of the head-start they offer.

Good lord....I didn't call anyone a mental midget. I was asking if that was you're implication. Regardless, we have differing opinions on this, as seen in other threads, and that obviously isn't going to change. I get much enjoyment out of a modified car if done well, but so many aren't, and I love a nice original classic regardless of how the owner managed to get there.

SeanPizzle
SeanPizzle New Reader
7/2/15 10:53 a.m.

If it was a 1975 I would consider adding this to my stable. Alas, 1976 still needs smog in CA.

alleykat
alleykat Reader
7/5/15 10:15 p.m.

Look who made Bring a Trailer

wspohn
wspohn HalfDork
7/6/15 11:58 a.m.

I wonder who the bright light was that first observed "Hey, these Porkers are tail heavy. We can fix that, let's put in a heavier engine that sticks out even further from the centre of gravity...."

Keith Tanner
Keith Tanner MegaDork
7/6/15 12:17 p.m.

How do you know it's heavier? Renegade claims the LS1 weighs less than the 3.0 naturally aspirated motor.

bmw88rider
bmw88rider Dork
7/6/15 12:33 p.m.

I'd rock it in a heart beat. To me that is the perfect early Porsche. Right color combo, clean, with AC, and I bet it's a blast to drive. Here is the thing, being a 76 it's not like it's the most desirable. Honestly, if I was in the market I would have already called the guy.

LopRacer
LopRacer Dork
7/6/15 9:01 p.m.

Would drive it all day, any day. Except maybe snow days.

pres589
pres589 UberDork
7/6/15 9:11 p.m.

In reply to Keith Tanner:

That seems really doubtful. The car should have a 2.7, I think, and a magnesium case with aluminum barrels. The fan isn't that big and there's no radiator or big water plumbing like an LS would need. Quick web search says the 2.7 is about 385 lb without oil and a manual flywheel equipped LS1 is about 485. It's web searches so grain of salt but this sounds about right to me.

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