pjbgravely
pjbgravely Reader
3/1/17 8:06 p.m.

2004 Honda Pilot. Rear brake pads on the left side wore out after 6 months. I found the pads jammed in the bracket. I had to hammer a chisel them out.

I figured the advance auto pads were at fault. I got some power stop pads and a new rotor with all new hardware on Rock Auto. 1 month later the pads are gone.

I have 3 things that can be bad, the flex lines, the caliper bracket and the caliper. The parking brake is separate. The first time there was noticeable drag after braking. Now there is none. Should I try to figure out what is bad or just replace everything. The caliper is still under warranty.

TGMF
TGMF Reader
3/1/17 8:14 p.m.

How did you prep the caliper bracket for the pads? Did you sand/grind off corrosion so that the pads simply rest in the bracket, and can easily move? From your description of chiseling them off I'm assuming this is your problem. All surfaces the pads rest on should be rust free. (I'm not talking about the friction surface)

Caliper slid pins. Doe they move freely? Well lubricated with silicon paste or similar?

Caliper piston- does it move back into its bore easily? If you (gently) pull the dust seal away to expose the side of the piston, is there visible corrosion?

If all the above are OK, replace the rubber brake line as it may have a internal failure causing a restriction.

02Pilot
02Pilot Dork
3/1/17 8:40 p.m.

I've encountered soft lines that have swollen internally. They'll let pressure through when applied through the pedal, but then they'll hold that pressure in the caliper after the pedal is released.

BrokenYugo
BrokenYugo MegaDork
3/1/17 9:31 p.m.

You have to hammer all the scale off the brackets and coat them in antiseize before you put the new ones in.

pjbgravely
pjbgravely Reader
3/1/17 10:29 p.m.

I cleaned the brackets with a wire wheel. I put anti-seize under the the anti rattle clips and used brake grease on the edges of the pads. When I got done the pads moved easily in the brackets, and still did when I pulled them out completely worn out.

It is hard to tell if the caliper is completely free because it is too small for my brake compression tool. When I put on the brake hard the rotor turns free after releasing.

Slide pins and clips were replaced and lubed.

I tried to see if the lines were at fault by loosening the bleeder after pushing the brake but there was no pressure on the caliper.

02Pilot
02Pilot Dork
3/2/17 7:01 a.m.

Perhaps something related to the ABS pump, maybe a sticking piston? How old is the brake fluid?

pjbgravely
pjbgravely Reader
3/13/17 10:12 p.m.

I changed the rubber lines to the caliper. The brake was running hot today. I checked it tonight and I could move the tire easily. I couldn't change the fluid because the suction bleeder I have won't suck the fluid out with any kind of speed on this vehicle.

When I check it in a few weeks, if it is still bad I will replace the caliper.

Knurled
Knurled MegaDork
3/14/17 12:41 p.m.
pjbgravely wrote: 2004 Honda Pilot. Rear brake pads on the left side wore out after 6 months. I found the pads jammed in the bracket. I had to hammer a chisel them out.

Hangers rusted, very common here, probably 90% of the time brake work is required because of this. If caught before it causes undue pad wear or rotor rust, you can just clean it all up and keep on truckin'. Seems to be required about once a year.

The easiest way to clean a hanger is to start with a coarse hacksaw blade. Rips the rust right up way faster than trying to file the rust out.

Never allow antiseize anywhere near brake parts! The heat turns into a thick paste that can also cause the pads to seize, and it destroys rubber too. Proper caliper slide lube is not very expensive, use that.

pjbgravely
pjbgravely Reader
3/15/17 11:43 a.m.
Knurled wrote:
pjbgravely wrote: 2004 Honda Pilot. Rear brake pads on the left side wore out after 6 months. I found the pads jammed in the bracket. I had to hammer a chisel them out.

Hangers rusted, very common here, probably 90% of the time brake work is required because of this. If caught before it causes undue pad wear or rotor rust, you can just clean it all up and keep on truckin'. Seems to be required about once a year.

The easiest way to clean a hanger is to start with a coarse hacksaw blade. Rips the rust right up way faster than trying to file the rust out.

Never allow antiseize anywhere near brake parts! The heat turns into a thick paste that can also cause the pads to seize, and it destroys rubber too. Proper caliper slide lube is not very expensive, use that.

I guess you missed this post.

pjbgravely wrote: I cleaned the brackets with a wire wheel. I put anti-seize under the the anti rattle clips and used brake grease on the edges of the pads. When I got done the pads moved easily in the brackets, and still did when I pulled them out completely worn out. Slide pins and clips were replaced and lubed.

The anti-sieze is under the rattle clips making the pads tight. The slide grease was allowing rust to build up under the clips. I guess Honda uses a lower quality of steel in their caliper brackets. The steel line between the 2 flex lines would not loosen despite being fairly rust free. Beeswax would not budge it so it had to be cut and replaced. More cheap steel perhaps.

I think my problem has multiple causes. The brake is dragging again. I will get the caliper replaced under warranty. If that doesn't work then brake fluid, then ABS.

pjbgravely
pjbgravely Reader
4/25/17 8:23 p.m.

I finally caught the caliper dragging when I changed the tires for summer. I got a free replacement from Advance auto parts quite easily. Hopefully that side is fixed.

The other side only has 1/2 the pads left. I am going to have to try a caliper change on that side too. Time to stock up on brake pads.

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