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iceracer
iceracer UberDork
7/3/13 5:45 p.m.
Gearheadotaku wrote: Corvairs aren't bad cars, but yes, buy the nicest one you can budget for. 1965 was the 1st year for the restyled body.

and the better suspension

Javelin
Javelin MegaDork
7/3/13 6:11 p.m.

Another option:

1978 Beetle Convertible

I'd rather have that Corvair though...

shadetree30
shadetree30 Reader
7/3/13 6:37 p.m.

In reply to AngryCorvair:

I will do that!

Kenny_McCormic
Kenny_McCormic SuperDork
7/3/13 7:06 p.m.
Javelin wrote: Another option: 1978 Beetle Convertible I'd rather have that Corvair though...

I'm seeing some very questionable rust spots(heater channel/door sill area, and just in front of the back tires) on that car that more or less totals a Beetle cabrio, and is a bitch to fix on a sedan.

crankwalk
crankwalk HalfDork
7/3/13 7:36 p.m.

Open top,factory turbo, 4 speed. That's the one I would want.

It seems most of the ones I see around here are coupe automatics.

SyntheticBlinkerFluid
SyntheticBlinkerFluid UberDork
7/3/13 7:37 p.m.

I'm glad that other Corvair enthusiasts like Angry and Jim are here on the board. The advice they have given you is spot on.

Corvairs are great cars. My dad has 3 ('64 110 Monza Convert, '66 140 Corsa Convert, and '69 140 Monza Convert) and I have one ('68 140 Monza Coupe). I grew up with them an was employed at the Vair Shop for several years. I have been driving them since I was 15.

140's IMO are the best engines, however they are known to drop valve seats. 110s are peppy, but leave you wanting more power. 180 Turbos are a blast, but parts can get pretty expensive because turbo stuff is not readily available.

Also on any Corvair engine, the oil pan gaskets have a tendency to leak, but Permatex Great Stuff is your best friend. Once we started using that, it stopped repeat customers for oil pan leaks.

Also, it is a wise idea to put in an electric fuel pump. The factory pumps were a poor design from the beginning and have a tendency of failing at the worst times. Even the "New" or Remanned pumps will fail. They make retrofit kits for the existing fuel pump to turn it into a bypass.

Hope you join the Cult.

Fueled by Caffeine
Fueled by Caffeine MegaDork
7/3/13 7:41 p.m.

Yes.

What car were we talking about?

Wxdude10
Wxdude10 New Reader
7/3/13 8:09 p.m.

Since we are talking Corvairs.... Quick question about seating capacity. Can the convertibles seat 3 across in the rear? Like the OP, I'm looking for something convertible that I can take the wife and my 3 boys for ice cream runs, or a cruise to the beach.

Thanks!

SyntheticBlinkerFluid
SyntheticBlinkerFluid UberDork
7/3/13 8:41 p.m.

Little kids 3 across yes, adults, no. It's probably not much bigger than a Mustang Convert of the same year.

SyntheticBlinkerFluid
SyntheticBlinkerFluid UberDork
7/3/13 8:45 p.m.

Here are my dads cars.

'66 Corsa

'64 Monza

'69 Monza

Wxdude10
Wxdude10 New Reader
7/3/13 10:22 p.m.

In reply to SyntheticBlinkerFluid:

10, 10, & 7. Just looking for something fun to work on with my boys and is a droptop. Thanks!

triumphcorvair
triumphcorvair New Reader
7/4/13 9:40 a.m.

I own a 65 140hp Monza with a 4 speed. I've lowered the car, added Konis, 17" wheels on Yokohamas. I also added headers but have since taken them off as being a flat 6 they hung to low. Also the increase in preformance was minimal as I don't have angled exhausts on the heads. The drum brakes are more than adequate unles s you're racing then disc brakes are recommended as previously mentioned. The car is a blast to drive and fairly simple to work on and maintain. There is a huge support group and parts are pretty easy to find. The car always draws a crowd, more so than my 68 Shelby or 73 XKE. I'm always being asked what type of car is it and I've heard all the Nader stories and how my buddy used to own one with 4 cylinders. If I purchased another I would look for a late model with a V8. I really don't think you can go wrong owning one.

kreb
kreb SuperDork
7/4/13 10:58 a.m.

It's hard to get on the V8 bandwagon. Either you have this noisy, hot lump sitting where your passengers used to, or it's weighing down the back, hurting your handling. I'd rather convert one to front-engined than do that.

Woody
Woody MegaDork
7/4/13 11:19 a.m.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TbImDmJdRcs

Junkyard_Dog
Junkyard_Dog Dork
7/4/13 11:57 a.m.
Woody wrote: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TbImDmJdRcs

So what you're saying is that its great for rallycross. Right?

Rusnak_322
Rusnak_322 HalfDork
7/4/13 12:35 p.m.
AngryCorvair wrote: In reply to Rusnak_322: "fuel pump leaked gas into the engine" could mean "all bearings are wiped and the cam is just a shaft of coaxial circles". if so, that's not really a "good car to make money on." it's also missing the wheel arch trim and the convertible top window. having said that, a '66 corsa ragtop is a pretty desirable car. check the body where the lower door hinges bolt on. they rust there due to the cowl vents allowing leaves and rain into that space, and it is structural to the unibody. general notes: if the drums are properly adjusted, not contaminated, and not leaking, they are actually quite good even with modern sticky tires. sloppy shifter = worn pins in the linkage, or worn bushings in teh shift tube. both are easy fixes if the car is not a rustbucket. the pins can get so worn that the trans won't go into reverse. loose steering can often be fixed with a nylon bushing where the pitman arm joins the drag link. cheap and effective. slow steering can be fixed with aftermarket "quick steering" arms. few corvairs were built with the optional quick-ratio steering box, but a corsa is a good candidate for having one. quick = 3.75 turns lock to lock versus 5.5 for a standard box. the aftermarket arms mess up the ackerman a bit, but it's not a disaster for a street car. honestly, it's probably not a disaster for a race car either. to answer the OP's original question: YES, you do want a corvair.

Called - motor is shot. Needs a crank at minimum. Is there a site like Samba for VW or pelican for Porsche that has a good Corvair classified section or am I better off on Craigslist?

SyntheticBlinkerFluid
SyntheticBlinkerFluid UberDork
7/4/13 1:40 p.m.

You could stick with Craigslist, but you are going to find more cars that are owned by people who don't really know the cars, i.e. they are going to need work.

My suggestion is that look up the more popular Corvair Forums or even local club sites, that may have a classified section. The Corvair Society of America (CORSA) has a classified section as well on their site.

ddavidv
ddavidv PowerDork
7/5/13 6:09 a.m.

I know someone was debating between the Corvair and the '63 Falcon...you can buy a much nicer Corvair for the same money. Falcons are bringing some really high prices (I've been shopping). Rust is equally scary on both. Parts availability is about the same, excellent. The Falcon will be less 'weird' to work on, being more like a farm tractor. The Corvair will ultimately handle far better, and I think is probably roomier in the interior.

Dodge Darts don't seem to bring nearly the same money. Also, Ramblers in varying sizes from the period are pretty affordable, but are more difficult to re-sell and any restoration type parts needed (vs mechanical stuff) will be vastly harder to come by.

foxtrapper
foxtrapper PowerDork
7/5/13 6:39 a.m.

OP, a sidecar (hack) rig doesn't take up any more garage space than a Corvair would.

Jim Pettengill
Jim Pettengill HalfDork
7/5/13 9:23 a.m.

I have to give a shout out for CORSA - the Corvair Society of America. Back when I was active in the Corvair scene, I belonged for many years, served on the competition committee for a few. CORSA is one of the very best marque clubs, easily worth the money. The magazine (CORSA Communiques) is filled with interesting articles and truly useful information. I recently joined the National Council of Corvette Clubs, a big organization, since I now have a really nice C4, and was really startled and disappointed at their national magazine - almost nothing of real value for the individual member. CORSA membership is an absolute must for any 'Vair enthusiast, or potential enthusiast. Two thumbs up (more if you got 'em).

AngryCorvair
AngryCorvair PowerDork
7/5/13 9:49 a.m.

did someone say V8 Vair?

i really need to stay off craigslist. you, OTOH, should get this car from the northwest corner of oregon and rock it like a hurricane, Scorpions-style.

SyntheticBlinkerFluid
SyntheticBlinkerFluid UberDork
7/5/13 1:07 p.m.
Jim Pettengill wrote: I have to give a shout out for CORSA - the Corvair Society of America. Back when I was active in the Corvair scene, I belonged for many years, served on the competition committee for a few. CORSA is one of the very best marque clubs, easily worth the money. The magazine (CORSA Communiques) is filled with interesting articles and truly useful information. I recently joined the National Council of Corvette Clubs, a big organization, since I now have a really nice C4, and was really startled and disappointed at their national magazine - almost nothing of real value for the individual member. CORSA membership is an absolute must for any 'Vair enthusiast, or potential enthusiast. Two thumbs up (more if you got 'em).

+1

shadetree30
shadetree30 Reader
7/5/13 2:15 p.m.
Rusnak_322 wrote:
AngryCorvair wrote: In reply to Rusnak_322: "fuel pump leaked gas into the engine" could mean "all bearings are wiped and the cam is just a shaft of coaxial circles". if so, that's not really a "good car to make money on." it's also missing the wheel arch trim and the convertible top window. having said that, a '66 corsa ragtop is a pretty desirable car. check the body where the lower door hinges bolt on. they rust there due to the cowl vents allowing leaves and rain into that space, and it is structural to the unibody. general notes: if the drums are properly adjusted, not contaminated, and not leaking, they are actually quite good even with modern sticky tires. sloppy shifter = worn pins in the linkage, or worn bushings in teh shift tube. both are easy fixes if the car is not a rustbucket. the pins can get so worn that the trans won't go into reverse. loose steering can often be fixed with a nylon bushing where the pitman arm joins the drag link. cheap and effective. slow steering can be fixed with aftermarket "quick steering" arms. few corvairs were built with the optional quick-ratio steering box, but a corsa is a good candidate for having one. quick = 3.75 turns lock to lock versus 5.5 for a standard box. the aftermarket arms mess up the ackerman a bit, but it's not a disaster for a street car. honestly, it's probably not a disaster for a race car either. to answer the OP's original question: YES, you do want a corvair.

Called - motor is shot. Needs a crank at minimum. Is there a site like Samba for VW or pelican for Porsche that has a good Corvair classified section or am I better off on Craigslist?

Since the Corvair Ranch is only one state away from you, you might consider them...717-624-2805, near Gettysburg PA

Kenny_McCormic
Kenny_McCormic SuperDork
7/5/13 9:59 p.m.
ddavidv wrote: I know someone was debating between the Corvair and the '63 Falcon...you can buy a much nicer Corvair for the same money. Falcons are bringing some really high prices (I've been shopping).

That's because there's no contest https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ShBoZt71pbs

ddavidv
ddavidv PowerDork
7/6/13 6:22 a.m.

That was awesome!

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