PHeller UltraDork
Oct. 23, 2012 11:24 a.m.

The owner of this car was trying to get $23,500 for it. He claimed he was an ex-F1 mechanic who built the suspension and flares himself.

Bring a Trailer Link

It seems to have the same appeal as a carbon-fiber skinned Miata, although I wonder if you could find a TR6 for similar prices in better condition and more easily stuff a V8 into one.

Or would it just be easier to go with the traditional answer? (Miata)

Rusted_Busted_Spit SuperDork
Oct. 23, 2012 11:37 a.m.

That is one of the BEST looking TR6s that I have ever seen. Oh my.

oldtin SuperDork
Oct. 23, 2012 11:39 a.m.

It looks good, but I don't see anything super special to bring anything close to his asking price. Maybe 1/2 of what he's asking. But I'm cheap.

spitfirebill
spitfirebill UltraDork
Oct. 23, 2012 11:43 a.m.

It's been for sale for quite a while I do believe.

Update:

Well for sale since 2008. I would have to see the car in person and drive it, but it seems too much for me. It needs bumpers.

93EXCivic MegaDork
Oct. 23, 2012 11:44 a.m.

A member on here is building a MKIII Supra engined TR6 with MKIII Suspension.... I have helped him with it a bit. It will be at the Challenge.

pres589 SuperDork
Oct. 23, 2012 12:26 p.m.

Is it just me, or is there only about 1/2 an inch of suspension compression available before the tire goes into the fender flair?

92CelicaHalfTrac MegaDork
Oct. 23, 2012 12:39 p.m.
pres589 wrote: Is it just me, or is there only about 1/2 an inch of suspension compression available before the tire goes into the fender flair?

Depends on the suspension setup. But yeah, doesn't look like there's a TON of room for movement.

pres589 SuperDork
Oct. 23, 2012 12:41 p.m.

I guess if the camber curve is poor then it might tuck in decently on compression. Which might actually be the case...

Joe Gearin Associate Publisher
Oct. 23, 2012 12:52 p.m.

Very nice original TR-6s are bringing $20-$25K these days. A modified car is a harder sell, especially one as throughly done as this one.

When you modify a car, you do it to please yourself. In selling a modded car, you have to find someone with nearly the exact same vision that you had. Thats a much harder proposition. I really like this TR-6, but it won't appreciate, and is one man's dream.

sure is cool though....

I'd supercharge the six instead of doing a V8 swap. There's plenty of power to be had with the original engine, and adding a supercharger won't ruin the car's value like a V8 swap would.

bravenrace PowerDork
Oct. 23, 2012 1:31 p.m.

While it's a nice car, I can say from experience that the 2.5 engine is very limited in it's performance potential.

Joe Gearin Associate Publisher
Oct. 23, 2012 1:34 p.m.

to bravenrace--- Limited is variable....

IIRC the TR-6 that Carl Heideman bolted a Moss Supercharger to ran from 0-60 in about 6.3 seconds. That would be plenty fast for me in a TR-6!

Keep in mind this was an older- bone stock engine. A mildly built 2.5 with the Supercharger would suit it nicely. Not cheap.....but pretty darn cool.

oldtin SuperDork
Oct. 23, 2012 1:37 p.m.

V8 ones can be nice too.

bravenrace PowerDork
Oct. 23, 2012 2:11 p.m.
Joe Gearin wrote: to bravenrace--- Limited is variable.... IIRC the TR-6 that Carl Heideman bolted a Moss Supercharger to ran from 0-60 in about 6.3 seconds. That would be plenty fast for me in a TR-6! Keep in mind this was an older- bone stock engine. A mildly built 2.5 with the Supercharger would suit it nicely. Not cheap.....but pretty darn cool.

That kind of performance isn't all that impressive today (and I've driven a TVR with about the same performance as the TR-6 you drove.), so yes, it's limited. This engine was derived from a tractor engine. You can make 150-160hp pretty easily. To get 170-180 NA, it's starting to become more like a race engine and much less street-able. 200hp is really pushing it, and usually the block gives up shortly after. It has a long stroke and one less main bearing than it should have, and the head has very limited flow capability.
IIRC, the supercharged engine makes around 180-190hp, which in my opinion isn't all that much, when you consider that you can build another inline 6 or V-8 for the same money that makes twice the power. Which is why I made the comment.
Unless you are a purist, an engine swap makes a ton of sense for these cars. I just wish I could find another engine that sounds as good!

93EXCivic MegaDork
Oct. 23, 2012 2:18 p.m.

To me, half the enjoyment of a TR6 is the sound of that sweet straight six so unless it is a car in the that is in really bad shape (like the car that I have helped with) I wouldn't swap the motor.

bravenrace PowerDork
Oct. 23, 2012 2:28 p.m.

In reply to 93EXCivic:

I'm commenting specifically on the car in the original post. It's obviously built to go fast, and all I'm saying is that you can only go so fast with the original engine.

NOHOME Dork
Oct. 23, 2012 3:20 p.m.

It has good visual impact. The modifications I can't speak to. The chassis on these cars has the structural characteristics of a lasagna noodle; your arm gets pinched in the B-pillar to door gap as you go over big bumps!

Engine is adequate and I expect the Webers will be a liability rather than an asset.

NO WAY I would pay that kind of money for a hot-rod TR6; 10k would be generous.

bravenrace PowerDork
Oct. 23, 2012 3:26 p.m.

In reply to NOHOME:

I tend to agree. I also know that you can make the same power on these engines with either 2 webers, 2 strombergs, or 2 mikunis. No need to add the complexity of three webers.

93EXCivic MegaDork
Oct. 23, 2012 3:46 p.m.

If I was doing a TR6 it would be just like the one in the OP.

grpb New Reader
Oct. 23, 2012 4:34 p.m.
bravenrace wrote: Unless you are a purist, an engine swap makes a ton of sense for these cars. I just wish I could find another engine that sounds as good!

Sure, any number of I6’s and even many I4’s would swap into that engine bay and make 200+ hp easily with less weight, but to what end? Might as well just tube frame it and roll it into a trailer because it wouldn’t be suitable for even casual street use without significant rear diff/axle upgrades, embarrassingly slow as an autocross car in a modified class, and not enough frame/brake/chassis to use for trackdays. Only would be good for standing around the open bonnet talking about the swap.

A TR6 with modern fuel injection, pretty warm but reliable (modern gaskets!) motor at ~170hp, T5 swap, and the normal handling/wheel/tire upgrades would be on par with a slightly modified Miata in terms of performance, but infinitely better because you can’t buy character for a Miata. I’m no purist, but I am a realist, and nothing wastes a car more than turning into something that really isn’t good at anything.

irish44j UltraDork
Oct. 23, 2012 7:23 p.m.
grpb wrote:
bravenrace wrote: Unless you are a purist, an engine swap makes a ton of sense for these cars. I just wish I could find another engine that sounds as good!

Sure, any number of I6’s and even many I4’s would swap into that engine bay and make 200+ hp easily with less weight, but to what end? Might as well just tube frame it and roll it into a trailer because it wouldn’t be suitable for even casual street use without significant rear diff/axle upgrades, embarrassingly slow as an autocross car in a modified class, and not enough frame/brake/chassis to use for trackdays. Only would be good for standing around the open bonnet talking about the swap.

A TR6 with modern fuel injection, pretty warm but reliable (modern gaskets!) motor at ~170hp, T5 swap, and the normal handling/wheel/tire upgrades would be on par with a slightly modified Miata in terms of performance, but infinitely better because you can’t buy character for a Miata. I’m no purist, but I am a realist, and nothing wastes a car more than turning into something that really isn’t good at anything.

well said.

I do love the TR6 in the OP though. not for that price, but I would rock that car over a comparably-priced Miata any day of the week. It won't be as fast at the track, or autocross, won't be as reliable or comfortable. But it will be 1 million times cooler, get 1 million times more attention from everyone you drive by, and would certainly put a grin on your face.

And people are too hung up on power. I have a 300hp WRX daily driver and a 100hp e30. The e30 is way more fun to drive, even as slow as it is. My 100hp GT6 is even more fun to drive, though takes a lot more concentration and attention than the e30. And the GT6 (in rattle-can primer black) has gotten "damn I love that" 's from Porsche and Ferrari drivers at gas stations or local get-togethers, and always gets positive comments from random people who see it. But it would get absolutely destroyed by a stock Honda Fit in any motorsports.

Don't buy a vintage car because you want to be the top dog at motorsports, or because you want to smoke guys from a stoplight. Buy it because it's fun to drive fast in an old, slow, borderline dangerous car that actually has character.

Oct. 23, 2012 7:28 p.m.
bravenrace wrote: This engine was derived from a tractor engine.

One of the greatest myths relating to British sports cars. The fact is that Standard-Triumph made a four cylinder engine that was used in various automotive applications and a derivative was used by Ferguson for the TE20.

The key to happiness with any British sports car is to have really low expectations. Keeping its performance in context, it was sporty with those extra two cylinders. Using today's benchmarks would be like me being able to beat Bruce Jenner in the 100m. Not that surprising, really.

NOHOME Dork
Oct. 23, 2012 7:47 p.m.
The key to happiness with any British sports car is to have really low expectations.

Seldom have truer words been spoken on this board.

mattmacklind UltimaDork
Oct. 23, 2012 10:21 p.m.
NOHOME wrote:
The key to happiness with any British sports car is to have really low expectations.

Seldom have truer words been spoken on this board.

The way I see it, if you think wooden roller coasters are lame, do not get into British sportscars.

bravenrace PowerDork
Oct. 24, 2012 5:49 a.m.
grpb wrote:
bravenrace wrote: Unless you are a purist, an engine swap makes a ton of sense for these cars. I just wish I could find another engine that sounds as good!

Sure, any number of I6’s and even many I4’s would swap into that engine bay and make 200+ hp easily with less weight, but to what end? Might as well just tube frame it and roll it into a trailer because it wouldn’t be suitable for even casual street use without significant rear diff/axle upgrades, embarrassingly slow as an autocross car in a modified class, and not enough frame/brake/chassis to use for trackdays. Only would be good for standing around the open bonnet talking about the swap.

A TR6 with modern fuel injection, pretty warm but reliable (modern gaskets!) motor at ~170hp, T5 swap, and the normal handling/wheel/tire upgrades would be on par with a slightly modified Miata in terms of performance, but infinitely better because you can’t buy character for a Miata. I’m no purist, but I am a realist, and nothing wastes a car more than turning into something that really isn’t good at anything.

A 170hp TR-67 engine isn't all that streetable in itself, and the rearend would still need to be upgraded to be durable. Again, I'm talking about the car above, that is already hightly modified, not a stocker. A well thought out engine swap would be cheaper, and more reliable than a highly modded 2.5 triumph. And I certainly wouldn't define it by your last sentence. In my experience, a 150hp NA 2.5 is a pretty nice street engine. A 170hp SC 2.5 is a better, but more expensive and less reliable street engine. Anything beyond that, which in my opinion this particular car is begging for, an engine swap makes a ton of sense. You don't have to agree.

bravenrace PowerDork
Oct. 24, 2012 5:57 a.m.
Apis_Mellifera wrote:
bravenrace wrote: This engine was derived from a tractor engine.

One of the greatest myths relating to British sports cars. The fact is that Standard-Triumph made a four cylinder engine that was used in various automotive applications and a derivative was used by Ferguson for the TE20.

The key to happiness with any British sports car is to have really low expectations. Keeping its performance in context, it was sporty with those extra two cylinders. Using today's benchmarks would be like me being able to beat Bruce Jenner in the 100m. Not that surprising, really.

It is my understanding that the 6 cylinder was derived from the 4 cylinder, which means it was derived from a tractor engine - I may be wrong. But more important is what it is, and that is a long stroke engine with terrible breathing and one less main bearing than it should have. Not a great recipe for performance.

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