Gingerbeardman
Gingerbeardman Reader
1/25/20 4:44 p.m.

So I have a 2005 Silverado that died when I was out driving around in the hills...battery died. Got it jump started and made it back to town. Parked it, shut it off, restarted it and drove around for a bit. Got back home, shut it down and went inside for the night.

Next morning it slow cranked, then click, click, click. Changed out battery, it'll turn over, but it won't start. It cranks like it has good compression, haven't checked coils yet. I have done the "static discharge" voodoo trick, where the disconnected negative and positive cables are touched together for 10 seconds, and gone through the security reset procedure.

Not a mechanic, or a technician...I'm a parts changer. If anyone can give me a list to check things out, so I can resolve this, I'd appreciate it.

From what I've found online, it could be a fuse, a relay, a fuel filter, a fuel pump, a BCM, a crank position sensor, a TPS sensor, etc.

I don't have a code reader, but I can pick one up.

It's not an emergency, but it is important that I get it back up and running relatively quickly. I just don't want to shotgun new parts when I could test things and troubleshoot to find the actual problem.

Streetwiseguy
Streetwiseguy MegaDork
1/25/20 5:13 p.m.

How about security?  If it has an immobilizer, gm will crank the battery dead without ever enabling injector pulse, because engineers are weird.

If you have a remote, close and lock the door, then unlock with the remote.  

Gingerbeardman
Gingerbeardman Reader
1/25/20 5:19 p.m.
Streetwiseguy said:

How about security?  If it has an immobilizer, gm will crank the battery dead without ever enabling injector pulse, because engineers are weird.

If you have a remote, close and lock the door, then unlock with the remote.  

No remote, just the manual keys, it's a manual-winder window, cloth bench seat, vinyl floor mat, automatic trans, extended cab work truck.

Any knowledge you can drop on resetting the immobilizer? I'm getting different answers on the forums...

Gearheadotaku
Gearheadotaku UltimaDork
1/25/20 5:33 p.m.

Pull a plug wire and check for spark. If present, get a set of noid lights from the local parts store loan a tool program and look for injector pulse.

Check fuel pressure at the rail too.

Is the security light on?

Gingerbeardman
Gingerbeardman Reader
1/25/20 5:43 p.m.
Gearheadotaku said:

Pull a plug wire and check for spark. If present, get a set of noid lights from the local parts store loan a tool program and look for injector pulse.

Check fuel pressure at the rail too.

Is the security light on?

I'll get a noid light, don't have a pressure gauge, will have to pick one up.

Security light comes on for 10-15 seconds then goes out.

Gingerbeardman
Gingerbeardman Reader
1/25/20 7:40 p.m.

I know that this sounds pathetic, but again, I'm not a mechanic/technician, I normally pay someone to repair my vehicles, but I'm fully capable of changing things out and know what/where (almost) all the parts are. I just don't want to flatbed this vehicle to the mechanic and pay them to track down the problem. 
If it ends up being the fuel pump, I'll pay them to change it, but I'm not willing to pay for a day's worth of diagnostics since I'm currently not engaged in any paying client work. If this were spring or summer I'd drop it off in a heartbeat, but I'm not in need of my vehicle right now to ensure my paycheck.

Streetwiseguy
Streetwiseguy MegaDork
1/25/20 9:07 p.m.

Get someone to crank the engine while you beat the bottom of the fuel tank with a hammer.  If it starts, book it for a new pump.

ebonyandivory
ebonyandivory PowerDork
1/26/20 7:38 a.m.

Was the battery brand new or at least tested for proper voltage when cranking and not?

It seems strange that this isn't linked to the battery dying. I don't believe in (very many)  coincidences.

Stampie
Stampie UltimaDork
1/26/20 11:15 a.m.

You could always pull the fuel pressure regulator and see if gas spurts out on cranking. That'll confirm fuel pump or not. 

dean1484
dean1484 MegaDork
1/26/20 11:15 a.m.

These are known for fuel pumps. Also changing one is easy. You just unbolt one side of the bed and loosen the other then tilt the bed up with a floor jack on the tire.  Put a couple pieces of wood in there to hold it. I use jack stands to hold the bed. But wood works ok as well. Pump replacement is then simple. An impact gun for the bed bolts makes this a super simple job. 
 

It is less than an hour job with basic hand tools.

There are u tube videos out there showing you how to do it. Where I learned it.  

Vigo
Vigo MegaDork
1/26/20 9:03 p.m.

First thing i'd do is pull the intake tube, spray some starting fluid or flammable brake cleaner down the throttle body, reconnect the tube (doesn't have to be tight but since there's a MAF the tube needs to be hooked up) and see if it will then start and run for a second. That would indicate a lack of fuel. If it doesn't, then you probably lack spark and would verify that.  If the engine sounds normal while cranking there's a 99% chance your compression is fine, so narrowing it down between lack of fuel and lack of spark is the first step. 

Gingerbeardman
Gingerbeardman Reader
1/28/20 3:56 p.m.

Thanks guys, I'm listening!

I'm trying to work this through step-by-step so I can give feedback on the situation, in case something or nothing works.

I'll return soon to ask more questions or at least let you know if the problem is resolved.

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