1 2
Keith
Keith SuperDork
3/6/12 9:00 a.m.

The term EVO magazine used to use for this was "perceived quality". In the showroom, a chunky old-school switch might feel as if it will last forever. But it may not actually last as well as a well-engineered one - and well-engineered can also mean "no unnecessary materials" so it won't feel as solid. Golfs of 10 years ago were a great example. They felt more solid than other cars of the class, but then the glovebox door would break off the first time it got cold.

Subaru has never been known for its interiors. But go work on one for a bit, you'll change your mind about them. And drive one too.

MG Bryan
MG Bryan Dork
3/6/12 9:04 a.m.
Keith wrote: The term EVO magazine used to use for this was "perceived quality". In the showroom, a chunky old-school switch might feel as if it will last forever. But it may not actually last as well as a well-engineered one - and well-engineered can also mean "no unnecessary materials" so it won't feel as solid. Golfs of 10 years ago were a great example. They felt more solid than other cars of the class, but then the glovebox door would break off the first time it got cold. Subaru has never been known for its interiors. But go work on one for a bit, you'll change your mind about them. And drive one too.

Adding to this, I can't see why the perceived quality and tactile sensations given by the interior of a Subaru or a Golf should matter anyway. The Subaru is utilitarian and the Golf is just a hatchback for the masses.

These things matter to me in a luxury sedan or big GT car, but otherwise, they don't register.

Otto Maddox
Otto Maddox SuperDork
3/6/12 9:10 a.m.

Most of us love to complain about the weight of cars too. But if every piece of the interior has a significant heft to signify build quality, the cars are going to weigh a lot more than they already do.

1 2
Our Preferred Partners
0rJ38uP1BF9Wq77xiRnrAO69A7Q0nOqO49YGcsOeZd2IoMutGUO1a1IgRg8YAMZ0