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tuna55
tuna55 MegaDork
9/14/20 3:03 p.m.

Someone clue me in:

 

We went to a bike park last weekend, and it was my first time on something so extreme. I expected a single track with some jumps, but it was actually much more than that. Hard packed, lots of jumps, wide, but technical and slow.

 

 

I was not doing that great because I missed a hop on that last picture. That's a curved bridge, and I was more worried about staying on the bridge than I was about speed. Hence I didn't have enough when I got to the end and instead of a (pretty big) bunny hop to get to the bump, I did more of a "fall on your knee" maneuver.

 

Anyway.

 

My kid is amazing. His bike is a REI rigid with fatter tires (not technically a fat tire bike, they are 24x 2.4) and he seemed to do fine.

 

I had my Specialized hardrock 20 year old aluminum bike with newer Tsali tires. It seemed fine for me really, and WOW traction riding up to that steep platform, other than riding the last hour and a half with a cantaloupe where my knee usually lives. The thing had traction and only was limited by my testicular fortitude.

 

So what am I, and what is he, missing by not riding the latest carbon frame 29" bike? Is it either so amazing that I have to try to understand, or is it such a nonissue I should just send it?

 

 

Ian F (Forum Supporter)
Ian F (Forum Supporter) MegaDork
9/14/20 4:16 p.m.

In reply to tuna55 :

Where is that?  I wish I had a jump line like that near me. 

Otherwise, I'm not sure what you mean.  Typical small bike parks are jumps and a pump track. Maybe a more open "skills" area.  Unless you're getting on a ski lift to the top of a mtn, I wouldn't expect actual single track trails.  In the first picture, the trail to the left is the beginner run.  You start on that and when you master it, move to the blue and black lines. Sort of like skiing.

Without looking at the lines first or knowing your experience, all I can say is when you ride stuff like that you should be wearing at least knee pads. As you obviously now know.

As far as the bike - jump lines can be ridden on an XC bike, but it's a lot easier on a 26" dirt jump bike.  When I ride stuff like that I will often ride my 20" BMX bike.  

It sounds like you are looking for more of a "trail system" than a bike park. Trying searching around on TrailForks.com

Recon1342
Recon1342 Dork
9/14/20 10:13 p.m.

In reply to tuna55 :

To piggyback on what Ian said, and to answer your question more directly- for trail riding, and all-around multi-terrain use, the bike you have is perfect. Bike parks like the one you posted are really more in the domain of dirt jump and/or full suspension all-mountain bikes. Check with a local bike shop and see about trail systems in your area.

tuna55
tuna55 MegaDork
9/15/20 7:48 a.m.
Ian F (Forum Supporter) said:

In reply to tuna55 :

Where is that?  I wish I had a jump line like that near me. 

Otherwise, I'm not sure what you mean.  Typical small bike parks are jumps and a pump track. Maybe a more open "skills" area.  Unless you're getting on a ski lift to the top of a mtn, I wouldn't expect actual single track trails.  In the first picture, the trail to the left is the beginner run.  You start on that and when you master it, move to the blue and black lines. Sort of like skiing.

Without looking at the lines first or knowing your experience, all I can say is when you ride stuff like that you should be wearing at least knee pads. As you obviously now know.

As far as the bike - jump lines can be ridden on an XC bike, but it's a lot easier on a 26" dirt jump bike.  When I ride stuff like that I will often ride my 20" BMX bike.  

It sounds like you are looking for more of a "trail system" than a bike park. Trying searching around on TrailForks.com

Spartanburg, SC

 

I actually enjoyed the park very much, I was really just curious of the state of our equipment, though I see now that it was poorly worded.

Ian F (Forum Supporter)
Ian F (Forum Supporter) MegaDork
9/15/20 9:36 a.m.

In reply to tuna55 :

I'm still not sure what you mean by "state of our equipment." frown

Jump parks can be fun on any bike, although jumping is generally easier on newer bikes with more aggressive geometry.  For your bike, the first thing I'd do is to drop the seat as low as it'll go.  Then you'll have more room to move around on the jumps and get behind the seat easier on the drops.

tuna55
tuna55 MegaDork
9/15/20 9:52 a.m.
Ian F (Forum Supporter) said:

In reply to tuna55 :

I'm still not sure what you mean by "state of our equipment." frown

Jump parks can be fun on any bike, although jumping is generally easier on newer bikes with more aggressive geometry.  For your bike, the first thing I'd do is to drop the seat as low as it'll go.  Then you'll have more room to move around on the jumps and get behind the seat easier on the drops.

I've only ever really ridden hard on single track stuff around lots of Michigan lakes, and it was 20 years ago. This is far out of my game. I enjoyed myself, so did the kids. I just don't know if we're out there on the equivalent of an XJ on a roadcourse, or if it was a decent fit. It sounds like we're fine based on the comments here.

Ian F (Forum Supporter)
Ian F (Forum Supporter) MegaDork
9/15/20 10:27 a.m.

In reply to tuna55 :

Sort of, but not really.  An XJ on a road course can still be fun, if not optimal. cheeky

When you get a few more sessions under your belt, try to see if you can get a ride on a DJ bike there.  

Mountain biking has sort of fractured in the last decade or so.  There are some who really focus on riding jumps and at gravity bike parks.  A friend of mine is like that.  She can do jumps and drops that I don't know if I'll ever do and she can drop me on a jump trail so fast it wouldn't be funny.  But put her on natural terrain DH race course and the opposite happens.  But I've been riding natural DH courses since she was (literally) in diapers. 

When she jumps, she has a lot more style than I do.

Dieselboss15
Dieselboss15 Reader
9/15/20 10:45 a.m.

In reply to Ian F (Forum Supporter) :

that looks amazing! to quote Wallys signature, be afraid, be very afraid. but do it anyway. tried that formula and it worked! scared as e63m3 but it was still fun lol

Dieselboss15
Dieselboss15 Reader
9/15/20 10:51 a.m.
tuna55 said:

 

 

 

sucks, i learned my lesson on asphalt. now i wear knee guards whenever i go jumping

tuna55
tuna55 MegaDork
9/15/20 10:57 a.m.

In reply to Dieselboss15 :

you know, it wasn't the skinned knee. I have really terrible knees. After this it swelled a lot. I had trouble walking the next day. I don't know if the knee guards would really have helped.

Ian F (Forum Supporter)
Ian F (Forum Supporter) MegaDork
9/15/20 12:40 p.m.

In reply to tuna55 :

Sometimes. It can depend on the knee pads and the impact.  In addition to abrasion protection, pads also spread the impact over a greater surface area and can help to limit soft tissue damage. Over the years I've had numerous tumbles when riding DH and got up and kept going without giving it much thought - until I got back to the van, took my jersey and armor off and saw all of the gouges in the armor. Eek. 

93EXCivic
93EXCivic MegaDork
9/15/20 2:09 p.m.
Ian F (Forum Supporter) said:

In reply to tuna55 :

I'm still not sure what you mean by "state of our equipment." frown

Jump parks can be fun on any bike, although jumping is generally easier on newer bikes with more aggressive geometry.  For your bike, the first thing I'd do is to drop the seat as low as it'll go.  Then you'll have more room to move around on the jumps and get behind the seat easier on the drops.

Are they easier on a more aggressive geo bike? I am not very good at jumping at all but I have found it easier to jump when I was riding a Kona Honzo over my current Ragley Big Wig. Admitedly the Honzo is a lot more aggressive then a 20 year old Hardrock. 

Ian F (Forum Supporter) said:

In reply to tuna55 :

Where is that?  I wish I had a jump line like that near me. 

As far as the bike - jump lines can be ridden on an XC bike, but it's a lot easier on a 26" dirt jump bike.  When I ride stuff like that I will often ride my 20" BMX bike. 

I wish I had something like that too. Jump lines can be ridden on an XC bike as long as the jumps aren't too big and you don't case the jump. Seen someone destroy a set of XC forks and break the head tube off doing that...

tuna55
tuna55 MegaDork
9/15/20 2:22 p.m.

In reply to 93EXCivic :

My jumps, especially after the knee, were barely jumps. I did not have the testicular fortitude to clear some of them until near the end. Something something old age something self-preservation something something.

93EXCivic
93EXCivic MegaDork
9/15/20 2:29 p.m.
tuna55 said:

In reply to 93EXCivic :

My jumps, especially after the knee, were barely jumps. I did not have the testicular fortitude to clear some of them until near the end. Something something old age something self-preservation something something.

Yeah you will probably be fine. If you do ever start to get more comfortable with jumps and start really airing them out maybe consider something a bit more bit for the abuse (like a 26in dirt jumper). But it you are just kind of riding it the bike will be fine. Like Ian drop the seat all the way, make sure you have some decent pedals with some somewhat grippy shoes (Vans would work well for this) and maybe grab some knee pads and have fun.

Ian F (Forum Supporter)
Ian F (Forum Supporter) MegaDork
9/15/20 3:14 p.m.

In reply to 93EXCivic :

I would say yes, at least compared to XC bikes of 20+ years ago.  Or hell... even my DH bike from 20+ years ago...  My Spot Ryve 115 is very much an XC/trail oriented bike, but it has proven to be a surprisingly good bike for moderate jumps.  I haven't tried riding it on jumps like those tuna pictured, since i have other bikes more suited for that.  DJ specific bikes are a different breed.  26" wheels, very short chain stays, longish top tubes, higher stack heights, overbuilt construction and components - many are also outfitted like large BMX bikes - one speed and rear brake only.  In theory, an older XC bike is similar, but in practice they are not.  Hard to explain why.  I have a full-suspension version (a somewhat rare Intense Tazer mean for dual slalom and four-cross racing) and while it's not a bad bike for jumping, I soon wish for a hardtail after a short time.  I am looking forward to getting my Chameleon built up.  Still waiting for cranks... 

And when you're starting out, get some shin pads along with knee pads.  When you slip a pedal on a botched landing, you'll find out why.

Dieselboss15
Dieselboss15 Reader
9/15/20 3:45 p.m.
tuna55 said:

In reply to Dieselboss15 :

you know, it wasn't the skinned knee. I have really terrible knees. After this it swelled a lot. I had trouble walking the next day. I don't know if the knee guards would really have helped.

they prolly would have prevented you from getting all those scratches tho lol

Dieselboss15
Dieselboss15 Reader
9/15/20 3:49 p.m.
Ian F (Forum Supporter) said:

In reply to 93EXCivic :

 

And when you're starting out, get some shin pads along with knee pads.  When you slip a pedal on a botched landing, you'll find out why.

even if your a pro(i ain't). i was attempting to do wheelies on my bike on labor day. pedal slipped and ripped a gauge in my shin an ~inch long. still hasn't healed all the way. thankfully it was lower on my shin and there wasn't much blood to clean up... 

93EXCivic
93EXCivic MegaDork
9/16/20 11:39 a.m.
Ian F (Forum Supporter) said:

In reply to 93EXCivic :

I would say yes, at least compared to XC bikes of 20+ years ago.  Or hell... even my DH bike from 20+ years ago...  My Spot Ryve 115 is very much an XC/trail oriented bike, but it has proven to be a surprisingly good bike for moderate jumps.  I haven't tried riding it on jumps like those tuna pictured, since i have other bikes more suited for that.  DJ specific bikes are a different breed.  26" wheels, very short chain stays, longish top tubes, higher stack heights, overbuilt construction and components - many are also outfitted like large BMX bikes - one speed and rear brake only.  In theory, an older XC bike is similar, but in practice they are not.  Hard to explain why.  I have a full-suspension version (a somewhat rare Intense Tazer mean for dual slalom and four-cross racing) and while it's not a bad bike for jumping, I soon wish for a hardtail after a short time.  I am looking forward to getting my Chameleon built up.  Still waiting for cranks... 

And when you're starting out, get some shin pads along with knee pads.  When you slip a pedal on a botched landing, you'll find out why.

I am guessing the shorter chainstays help it pop a bit more. That is kind what I was guessing with the Honzo (67deg head angle, similar reach and bb drop to Big Wig and ~415mm chainstays) vs my Big Wig (65deg head angle and 435mm chainstays). I have rode one DJ I think I prefer 20in BMX tbh.

Shin pads aren't a bad idea but if your legs don't have more scars then stars in the sky are you really a mountain biker?

ProDarwin
ProDarwin UltimaDork
9/21/20 7:54 a.m.

I made it out this weekend (thanks Ian for the pedals) for a shakedown ride.  New rack & hitch seem to work fairly well.  Bike rides great.  Needs a little more tweaking to get the shifting just right.  I forgot I gave away my floor pump & hand pump when I sold my old bikes, so I get to buy those all over again, along with a shock pump as well.  laugh

Ian F (Forum Supporter)
Ian F (Forum Supporter) MegaDork
9/21/20 10:35 a.m.

In reply to 93EXCivic :

I have plenty of scars on my body from riding bikes. Some are over 40 years old. I seem to add to the collection often enough without adding to the risk.  Surprisingly, I still seem to heal from normal scrapes and bruises fairly well for a 50 year old... 

They have definitely hit a sweet spot with geometry in recent years. 

In reply to ProDarwin :

Doh... I have at least one extra shock pump.

Dieselboss15
Dieselboss15 Reader
9/21/20 12:04 p.m.
93EXCivic said:
Ian F (Forum Supporter) said:

In reply to 93EXCivic :

I would say yes, at least compared to XC bikes of 20+ years ago.  Or hell... even my DH bike from 20+ years ago...  My Spot Ryve 115 is very much an XC/trail oriented bike, but it has proven to be a surprisingly good bike for moderate jumps.  I haven't tried riding it on jumps like those tuna pictured, since i have other bikes more suited for that.  DJ specific bikes are a different breed.  26" wheels, very short chain stays, longish top tubes, higher stack heights, overbuilt construction and components - many are also outfitted like large BMX bikes - one speed and rear brake only.  In theory, an older XC bike is similar, but in practice they are not.  Hard to explain why.  I have a full-suspension version (a somewhat rare Intense Tazer mean for dual slalom and four-cross racing) and while it's not a bad bike for jumping, I soon wish for a hardtail after a short time.  I am looking forward to getting my Chameleon built up.  Still waiting for cranks... 

And when you're starting out, get some shin pads along with knee pads.  When you slip a pedal on a botched landing, you'll find out why.

I am guessing the shorter chainstays help it pop a bit more. That is kind what I was guessing with the Honzo (67deg head angle, similar reach and bb drop to Big Wig and ~415mm chainstays) vs my Big Wig (65deg head angle and 435mm chainstays). I have rode one DJ I think I prefer 20in BMX tbh.

Shin pads aren't a bad idea but if your legs don't have more scars then stars in the sky are you really a mountain biker?

first you get all the scars. then you learn your lesson and get shin pads lol

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