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maschinenbau
maschinenbau SuperDork
6/12/19 12:13 p.m.

I agree, it's incredibly thrilling and unlike any other type of cycling I've done. Ours is the Dick Lane Velodrome in Atlanta. https://www.dicklanevelodrome.com/. 1/5 mile (321.8m) and 36 degree banking. It's a special place and I'm lucky to be near it. Next closest track is 8 hours away. And yes they do race Madison here laugh I'm not good enough for that yet.

Powar
Powar UltraDork
6/12/19 12:15 p.m.

Nothing as cool as the Felt-on-a-Velodrome above, but I got my old Peugeot out last week and have been putting some miles on it near my house at lunchtime. It feels good to be back on a bike. Maybe I'll get my Felt out later this week too.

chandler
chandler PowerDork
6/12/19 2:53 p.m.

Ive been putting 30-60 minutes in every day on this, feeling great !

Ransom
Ransom PowerDork
6/12/19 5:55 p.m.

In reply to chandler :

I find for the stationary stuff it really helps to have good distraction. I think I've plugged The Sufferfest in here before. Of course, that works best with a power meter, but they have guidelines for getting input back into the system with just speed, and you can use it by feel with nothing more than what you've got.

Scenery, structure, humor. Good stuff.

Patrick
Patrick MegaDork
6/12/19 10:17 p.m.

I recently assembled this pile of patina from 3 bikes.  It shall be my pit bike.  20” very old school huffy trike with newer aluminum rear wheels from a garbage day mountain bike and front forks/bars/wheel from a 24 or 26” huffy mountain bike that was free and not good enough to fix to donate.  My dad has a front wheel electric assist motor that i may try to fit, and I think it needs lights for being in the pits after dark.  I have lots of led’s

nocones
nocones UltraDork
6/12/19 10:33 p.m.

And on the complete other side of things just picked this up used off clist.  2014 Cervelo P2 with 60 mm carbon wheels.  My first TT bike, my first carbon bike.  

Training continues for my 1/2 Ironman in 4 weeks.  Now I need to pound miles to make sure my fit is correct on this.  

Ian F
Ian F MegaDork
6/13/19 6:29 a.m.

In reply to nocones :

Looks nice - and Fast! 

I would HIGHLY recommend getting professionally fitted to the bike by a shop that knows Tri/TT bikes. I've been told numerous times fitting on a tri-bike is a bit different than on a standard TT bike.  Something about tri fitting being more in tune with using running muscles vs pedaling muscles.  Either way, getting a pro-fitting on a road bike is very important since you sit in one position for long periods (vs. a mtn bike where you move around a lot). An ill-fitting bike is at best uncomfortable and at worst will cause injury.

maschinenbau
maschinenbau SuperDork
6/13/19 7:17 a.m.

In reply to nocones :

ultraclyde
ultraclyde PowerDork
6/13/19 9:24 a.m.

Wow. Fun stuff going on. Always wanted to check out the DLV but the 2 hour drive up from Macon means no joy for watching the weekly races.

My only additions have been a Quadlock brand case and handlebar phone mount. I generally despise bar mounted cell phones on bikes, but several of the gravel rides I do are unmarked, so having the GPS route guidance is key. It's much easier witht he phone on the bar. And since I'm going to have it there anyway, I'm kind of migrating all my bike-computer functions to it using the RideWithGPS app. 

I'll say this - the Quadlock system is awesome. The low-profile connection is made into the phone case and has positive retention on the bar mount. They also make the mounts with a 1" ball to fit RAM mounts so I've put those in my truck and on the boat. They are the bees knees.

 

Oh, and I spent way too much on a Spurcycle bell for my commuter/camp bike because diiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnngggggggggggggggggggggggggggg.

TVR Scott
TVR Scott HalfDork
6/13/19 12:51 p.m.
ultraclyde said:

Oh, and I spent way too much on a Spurcycle bell for my commuter/camp bike because diiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnngggggggggggggggggggggggggggg.

I saw one of those when I was picking up the new MTB the other day - they're really cool!  And LOUD!  I'll probably spend way too much on one too.

(not) WilD (Matt)
(not) WilD (Matt) Dork
6/13/19 2:01 p.m.

I have a Spurcycle bell on my CX bike that I purchased from their initial Kickstarter campaign.    I see they now cost more, but they are still probably worth it.  It is a superior bell in both design and quality.

GhiaMonster
GhiaMonster Reader
6/13/19 4:00 p.m.

Over 10 years ago I rode someone else’s homemade e-bike and it stuck with me. It was just a simple front hub motor on a basic mountain bike but ever since then I have wanted to build one as a winter project.  Every winter I always came up with a car project that took time and money precedence and put it off.  This winter I was lacking workshop space due to a move so a bike project was the perfect thing.  I was going to build up a new frame but as I put together what I wanted such as front suspension, disk brakes, decent sized tires and a somewhat lightweight bike I realized that was basically the Specialized hardtail I already had.  I finally moved to a full suspension Kona last year so the hardtail wasn’t seeing as much use and seemed like it would be a fun bike to play with.  My intent for this bike was not to ride mountain bike trails but to be capable on forest roads and also rip around town. 

I wanted a mid-drive setup since to me it hub motors had too many compromises.  I went with the hotrodded 750 watt (or 1 hp as I like to put it) kit from Luna Cycles which is both pedal assist and has a throttle.  I see it pull a max of about 1100 watts, although I’m not sure how accurate my readout is.  This replaces the bottom bracket and converts the bike to a 1x10 drivetrain in my case. Not knowing what front sprocket to go with I picked a 48 tooth which fits with under and 1/8” to spare and still gives me a low enough 1st gear for getting up big hills without the motor if needed.  I’m happy with how this guess worked out.  After some spirited riding I needed to add a front chain keeper to prevent throwing the chain with medium sized bumps. 

One of my goals was to keep it from looking to much like an e-bike while keeping weight as low and centralized as possible.  The 14 Ah battery just fits in the frame bag and all the wiring is tucked along the frame and following the brake lines as much as possible. If you don’t pick up on the motor hanging down low it just looks like a mountain bike with a frame bag and small bike computer on the bars.  I guess the throttle would give it away if you noticed it wasn’t for a dropper post. 

I’ve been able to hit 33 MPH on the flats and it will pull wheelies with the throttle in low gears. It also still manages to scare me from time to time so I think it’s a successful build. Trying to keep up with two friends on dual sports over the course of 20 miles of loose gravel logging roads I was within a few minutes of them getting places and still had half a battery left at the end. 

I know, berkeley e-bikes and all that. Don’t care and still get plenty of unassisted miles on other bikes. Unexpectedly I still get a huge workout when I ride it since I still pedal hard to maintain higher speeds.  For me it’s the same amount of work as a normal ride, I’m just going twice as fast.   

HFmaxi
HFmaxi Reader
6/14/19 6:17 a.m.

Picked this up an older geometry Brisa B26 last weekend for not all that much. Hoping to just chase the kids around, not hurt myself too badly and relearn some balance stuff since I haven't ridden trials since it was "popular". So far I've removed the shifter, swapped on some better used grips and put on a set of red Kool stops. I don't particularly care for the pedals but everything seems to work.

failboat
failboat UberDork
6/14/19 6:26 a.m.

with kid #2 quickly growing up and almost able to ride in the bike trailer, I just know his 4 yr old sister is going to want to ride with him. I decided my entry level 26" bmx cruiser isnt going to cut it with one speed, need something with gears. 

I am sure I can get all sorts of halfway decent stuff for not a lot of money but this thread kind of sucked me in and captured my attention and now I am looking at mongoose fat tire bikes

https://forums.mtbr.com/fat-bikes/dolo-semi-wild-mongoose-dolomite-902410.html

I have these bad ideas in my head about some fast rolling cruiser tires for the street, some lightweight parts here and there, upgraded freewheel with better gearing range, bmx stem and bars. maybe a retro mongoose bmx frame decal kit.

Furious_E
Furious_E UltraDork
6/14/19 10:40 a.m.

Some good bike pron on these last few pages cheeky. Not helping my want for a new cycle...

I've been riding the mtb at least once a week with a coworker at the state park near work, where they've cut a bunch of new trails since last fall, and at least another couple times at the small park closer to home. Had to replace a crank arm that got loose and wallowed out the taper on the mounting point, but other than that the Diamondback I bought last summer has been holding up and performing well. 

Lately, I find myself wanting to do some longer and more varied riding (rail trails, gravel roads, and forest double track, with pavement on the way there and back) as well, and while the mountain bike can work for that, the 27.5x3 tires certainly limit speed and efficiency quite a bit. So I've been looking at CX and gravel bikes a lot lately as an all-purpose complement to the mtb, and might even like to pick up a frameset and build one up myself. Maybe. I realize that isn't the most cost effective way to go, but I think it would be fun to do, and the project aspect of it excites me as much as anything. Or maybe, as a cheaper alternative, I just pick up an older, full rigid mtb and throw some drop bars and skinnier tires on that ('monstercross' I guess is what you'd call that?), although I wonder how well the geometry would work for that?

In any case, not ready to spend the money on anything just yet, but it's still fun to do the research and window shop. 

Nick Comstock
Nick Comstock MegaDork
6/14/19 11:32 a.m.

In reply to GhiaMonster :

If I ever get some money freed up I'm planning to electrify the commuter bike since my knees won't let me ride it anymore. I'd love to go with mid drive but budget will likely have to be a hub motor. 

 

Ian F
Ian F MegaDork
6/14/19 11:44 a.m.

In reply to Furious_E :

I build nearly all of my bikes a la cart from bare frames. Partly due to sponsor parts and partly due to me being picky about what I want.  The latter definitely applies to my road bikes.  I bought a new complete gravel bike a few years ago and I'm now debating whether to rebuild it from the frame up with components I want, or to just sell it and get a new frame.  My problem with road bikes is I like Campagnolo parts and there are pretty much zero bikes factory specd with Campy - all Shimano or SRAM.  The gravel bike came with SRAM and after trying it for a few rides, I learned that I just want Campy.  And whoever invented flared drop bars should be drawn and quartered.

One big downside of building up a bike yourself these days is parts are no longer quite as universal as they used to be.  The variations in bottom brackets and headsets has gotten ridiculous. If there's been one good thing, the proliferation of dropper seat posts has made 31.6 the defacto standard. Most frames use that size with a handful using 30.9.  That said, most road frames still use 27.2 posts (unless they use proprietary aero posts).

It can still be a fun project, but be prepared to spend some money on special tools (or have certain tasks farmed out - like press-fit bottom brackets) as well as the occasional frustration from accidentally ordering the wrong sized part.

John Welsh
John Welsh Mod Squad
6/15/19 11:45 a.m.

I have been inspired to get my '93 Bridgestone MB4 out of my inlaws pole barn.  So far, I have just done some surface cleaning. 

GameboyRMH
GameboyRMH MegaDork
6/16/19 4:24 p.m.

Another dollar-store upgrade, I found a clamp-on drink holder to work around the lack of any more mounting points for a second one. Took it for a ride on a nearby trail which seems to have fully transitioned into a dog park:

Wasn't all good news since I received many bites from beefy mosquitoes every time i stopped, and cut my knee in a slow-motion stop-and-drop. Also while the dollar store underseat bag's zipper stayed shut, a seam has started to fray.

GhiaMonster
GhiaMonster Reader
6/16/19 7:57 p.m.
John Welsh said:

I have been inspired to get my '93 Bridgestone MB4 out of my inlaws pole barn.  So far, I have just done some surface cleaning. 

 

That sprung handlebar setup is cool, I've never seen anything like it.  How well does it work? I think the lack of them today may give the answer but it's some cool history to have.

ShawnG
ShawnG PowerDork
6/16/19 8:17 p.m.

In reply to GhiaMonster :

It's a Softride stem. I've got the even-more-prmitive Girvin Flexstem in a box at home.

They're sketchy as frig.

Modern suspension is soo good that I've become an all-or-nothing kind of guy. My vintage Brodie Expresso is fully rigid and I still have my Cannondale Gemini with 170mm of travel at both ends.

I ride the Brodie a lot more.

93EXCivic
93EXCivic MegaDork
6/18/19 2:28 p.m.
Ransom said:

In reply to chandler :

I find for the stationary stuff it really helps to have good distraction. I think I've plugged The Sufferfest in here before. Of course, that works best with a power meter, but they have guidelines for getting input back into the system with just speed, and you can use it by feel with nothing more than what you've got.

Scenery, structure, humor. Good stuff.

I use Trainerroad plus listening to podcasts really helps with training.

ultraclyde
ultraclyde PowerDork
6/18/19 2:36 p.m.
GhiaMonster said:
John Welsh said:

I have been inspired to get my '93 Bridgestone MB4 out of my inlaws pole barn.  So far, I have just done some surface cleaning. 

 

That sprung handlebar setup is cool, I've never seen anything like it.  How well does it work? I think the lack of them today may give the answer but it's some cool history to have.

You say that - ironically a couple companies have recently been touting flex stems again, specifically aimed at the gravel racer market who mostly run rigid bike. Everything old is new again...

Per Schroeder
Per Schroeder PowerDork
6/18/19 3:16 p.m.

In reply to nocones :

Nice! Good luck on the half! 

 Here's my Tri bike:  

 

Ransom
Ransom PowerDork
6/18/19 5:30 p.m.
ultraclyde said:
- ironically a couple companies have recently been touting flex stems again, specifically aimed at the gravel racer market who mostly run rigid bike. Everything old is new again...

I had a dropper post on my Fisher Hoo Koo E Koo in '87!

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