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PHeller
PHeller PowerDork
11/4/15 4:54 p.m.

I've recently started learning that some people don't like being called "dude". Why is that, and where do these people live? Is this a regional thing? Or are these just folks who like being called "Sir" all the time?

Will
Will SuperDork
11/4/15 4:56 p.m.

You can use Dooder, or El Dudearino if you're not into the whole brevity thing.

Rufledt
Rufledt UltraDork
11/4/15 5:01 p.m.

When i've seen people get offended by 'dude', it's usually because they think they deserve placement above the speaker (the 'dude user') in some social hierarchy that the speaker is not respecting by calling them 'dude'. They are usually shiny happy people who take themselves too seriously.

Brian
Brian MegaDork
11/4/15 5:02 p.m.

The original connotation is less than positive. One could also take exception to the informal aspect of being addressed as "dude".

NordicSaab
NordicSaab Reader
11/4/15 5:04 p.m.

Datsun310Guy
Datsun310Guy PowerDork
11/4/15 5:04 p.m.

I tell the teenagers at my church they can call me dude when we are in Wyoming or Montana riding horses.

Bobzilla
Bobzilla UltimaDork
11/4/15 5:12 p.m.

It's a sign of disrespect. I personally don't like being called dude because it means you've put zero thought into who it is you're talking to.

oldtin
oldtin UberDork
11/4/15 5:12 p.m.

Context matters. If I'm in a store and another customer says "hey dude, you dropped something." No biggie. If I'm in a store and the sales clerk says "what do you want dude?" I would probably be a little put off - even as an ordained minister of the Church of the Latter Day Dude.

EvanB
EvanB UltimaDork
11/4/15 5:13 p.m.

logdog
logdog SuperDork
11/4/15 5:16 p.m.

I prefer "Chief" or "Bucko".

Rufledt
Rufledt UltraDork
11/4/15 5:21 p.m.

In case anyone needs some reading material: http://americanspeech.dukejournals.org/content/79/3/281.short

Abstract: "The patterns of use for the address term dude are outlined, as are its functions and meanings in interaction. Explanations are provided for its rise in use, particularly among young men, in the early 1980s, and for its continued popularity since then. Dude is used mostly by young men to address other young men; however, its use has expanded so that it is now used as a general address term for a group (same or mixed gender), and by and to women. Dude is developing into a discourse marker that need not identify an addressee, and more generally encodes the speaker's stance to his or her current addressee(s). Dude indexes a stance of cool solidarity, a stance which is especially valuable for young men as they navigate cultural Discourses of young masculinity, which simultaneously demand masculine solidarity, strict heterosexuality, and nonconformity."

I don't know if anyone else can access the whole article, but basically it's used as a sign of solidarity. Getting offended by it seems to indicate, then, that the person who got offended does not want 'solidarity' with the person using 'dude'. The reason is probably HEAVILY based on context, as Oldtin said.

The Hoff
The Hoff UltraDork
11/4/15 5:25 p.m.

Get over it dude

Rufledt
Rufledt UltraDork
11/4/15 5:25 p.m.

To clarify: 'dude' "encodes the speaker's stance to his or her current addressee". Meaning calling someone "dude" indicates that the speaker (dude-user) sees the person they are calling 'dude' as within some grouping or social status as themselves. People taking offense usually see themselves as different or higher in status than the dude-user. In some contexts, like a person working at a grocery store addressing a customer, dude won't be socially acceptible, but in some other context (like 2 people just talking face to face) dude-offense signifies, to me, a shiny happy person. Just one man's opinion.

Also a fun fact, the writer of that article took data of 'dude use' on a mass scale, assembling it into something called the 'Dude Corpus', possibly the greatest potential band name to come from any academic article, ever.

Tom_Spangler
Tom_Spangler UltraDork
11/4/15 5:26 p.m.

That's a term noone would self-apply where I come from.

Seriously, anyone who would get offended by being called "Dude" needs to back off on the caffeine or something. Who berkeleying cares?

OHSCrifle
OHSCrifle HalfDork
11/4/15 5:42 p.m.

It's like the word "Boss". Use carefully.

I don't mind "dude" but I typically respond with "yes sir"... just for the confusing looks it generates.

https://www.youtube.com/embed/ecusFH-T7Io

stuart in mn
stuart in mn PowerDork
11/4/15 6:08 p.m.

Maybe it's okay with your friends, but I would imagine most people don't like being called dude.

02Pilot
02Pilot Dork
11/4/15 6:24 p.m.
Rufledt wrote: "Dude indexes a stance of cool solidarity, a stance which is especially valuable for young men as they navigate cultural Discourses of young masculinity, which simultaneously demand masculine solidarity, strict heterosexuality, and nonconformity."

Am I the only one who sees a bit of a contradiction in "cool solidarity" and "nonconformity" both being part of the "cultural Discourses of young masculinity"? Reminds me of an exchange from an old MASH episode:

Hawkeye: "What's normal, Frank?

Frank: "Normal is everybody doing the same thing."

Trapper: "What about individuality?"

Frank: "Individuality's fine, as long as we all do it together."

spitfirebill
spitfirebill PowerDork
11/4/15 6:47 p.m.

Dude takes me back to the stoners in college that murdered the word.

Appleseed
Appleseed MegaDork
11/4/15 6:49 p.m.

Ask them which they prefer: Dude or berkeleystick.

SVreX
SVreX MegaDork
11/4/15 6:55 p.m.

berkeleying dude.

Dusterbd13
Dusterbd13 UberDork
11/4/15 6:58 p.m.

In my town, using the word dude will result in either getting your butt kicked for negative connotations, get you labelled as a hippie communist freak, or both.

So round here, its sir, ma'am, or "hey man".

codrus
codrus Dork
11/4/15 7:13 p.m.
Rufledt
Rufledt UltraDork
11/4/15 7:13 p.m.
02Pilot wrote:
Rufledt wrote: "Dude indexes a stance of cool solidarity, a stance which is especially valuable for young men as they navigate cultural Discourses of young masculinity, which simultaneously demand masculine solidarity, strict heterosexuality, and nonconformity."
Am I the only one who sees a bit of a contradiction in "cool solidarity" and "nonconformity" both being part of the "cultural Discourses of young masculinity"? Reminds me of an exchange from an old MASH episode: Hawkeye: "What's normal, Frank? Frank: "Normal is everybody doing the same thing." Trapper: "What about individuality?" Frank: "Individuality's fine, as long as we all do it together."

very true, but doing something that you think is nonconformist, and actually not conforming, are 2 different things. Think about hipsters, they are trying to not conform, but they are just creating a whole new conformity. Hippies did the same thing. And goths. There was a south park on that last one.

former520
former520 Reader
11/4/15 7:17 p.m.

Forget about it

petegossett
petegossett PowerDork
11/4/15 7:32 p.m.

Hey dude...

"Buddy" is the one that gets me more than any of the others.

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