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93EXCivic
93EXCivic MegaDork
11/23/20 8:01 p.m.
adam525i (Forum Supporter) said:

In reply to 93EXCivic :

Those look pretty cool. It seemed like 10 years ago some of the bigger brands were pushing more sweep (my 2011 Trek/Gary Fisher Paragon came with Bontrager Big Sweep bars), are you running them for comfort? Where does it put your hands with regards to the head tube/steerer tube? Are they behind it with a short stem or still in front a bit? Just curious really.

Yeah I was struggling a bit with handpump and I had heard good things about more swept back bars so I decided to give them a try. Three rides totaling 41 miles they have been great. I was running a 35mm stem but swapped to a 53mm stem. Also the bars a bit higher now between going from a no rise stem with 40mm rise bars to a top mount BMX stem with 2in rise bars. 

Brett_Murphy (Ex-Patrón)
Brett_Murphy (Ex-Patrón) MegaDork
11/27/20 6:20 p.m.

I have no idea what handpump is.

The seat on my bike is killing my backside.  I've put in about 32 miles on the bike, plus some work on the stationary bike during the week. The stationary bike has a wide, padded seat and it didn't seem bad. The real bike has a narrow, hard seat and my glutes are protesting it.

I'm hoping I get more used to it, but if not, I might need a different one.

wearymicrobe
wearymicrobe PowerDork
11/27/20 6:30 p.m.

Took my old race bike out today. I am not in shape to climb with it that is for sure. I can hammer away on the straights though like no tomorrow. 

53/39 with a 12/23 rear is not the right gearing. It looks like I can do a 11/32 or 12/29 cassette through pretty cheap that will fit with the rear derailleur and give me much better climbing. Not sure if I will need to swap out for compact cranks. 

ultraclyde (Forum Supporter)
ultraclyde (Forum Supporter) UltimaDork
11/28/20 9:09 a.m.

In reply to Brett_Murphy (Ex-Patrón) :

Saddles are such a difficult thing. The super wide, soft seats suck when you are actually riding distance. They rub and chafe. Narrow seats are better, but they have to be the right narrow to fit your bones. Then you have to find the right combination of shape, material, and padding to fit your butt. Some shops have measuring pads you sit on to get a starting point. Great shops have a stash of loaner saddles in different design and sizes they'll let you borrow and audition. Good saddles can be pricey so it sucks if you have to buy several to find the right one. But you can often sell the lightly used ones for decent money if they are high end. 
 

I know several hard core riders that have bought multiples of a saddle once the find THE right one. They hoard them against the day the manufacturer discontinues the model they like. 

Ian F (Forum Supporter)
Ian F (Forum Supporter) MegaDork
11/28/20 11:58 a.m.
ultraclyde (Forum Supporter) said:

In reply to Brett_Murphy (Ex-Patrón) :

I know several hard core riders that have bought multiples of a saddle once the find THE right one. They hoard them against the day the manufacturer discontinues the model they like. 

Yep.  I hoard Selle Italia Flite saddles. I've run them on my bikes for almost 30 years and my butt is unhappy when I try any other saddle.  I even have one on my BMX bike (although that one was actually trash-picked from a shop because the cover was destroyed, so it's only the plastic shell).

travellering
travellering HalfDork
11/28/20 7:11 p.m.

In reply to wearymicrobe :

For my racing career I would have fought getting a compact tooth and nail.  Don't need no granny low.  After a 10 year hiatus, all the new bikes in my price range came with a 50/34 and 11/28.  I dealt with it and have found I can hold a good cadence up pitches that had my knees creaking back when I was in my 20's.  Can still spin up to 45mph on the downhills, so almost nothing lost there.

wearymicrobe
wearymicrobe PowerDork
11/28/20 7:44 p.m.
travellering said:

In reply to wearymicrobe :

For my racing career I would have fought getting a compact tooth and nail.  Don't need no granny low.  After a 10 year hiatus, all the new bikes in my price range came with a 50/34 and 11/28.  I dealt with it and have found I can hold a good cadence up pitches that had my knees creaking back when I was in my 20's.  Can still spin up to 45mph on the downhills, so almost nothing lost there.

I really want to do the compact and the 11/28 but with the age of the bike and how many miles it has on it its not worth the effort. My digging online says I can go up to 12-32 with the rear deratiler I have and a new chain so I am going to start there. 

Brett_Murphy (Ex-Patrón)
Brett_Murphy (Ex-Patrón) MegaDork
11/29/20 9:34 p.m.

Returning to the topic of saddles, I went to a fitment guide and found out that my saddles is to narrow for my sit bones. Additionally, it seems to be designed for a drop bar bike position, not the upright, flat bar position I'm currently using.

No wonder it was aggressively cleaving into my backside. 

I also learned a bunch of stuff about bike setup. Pretty much the only thing I knew about was getting the seat height correct, so I learned about bar angle, grip shape, lever angle and so on.

The bottom line is that:

1. I need a bigger seat with a different shape.
2. I need to adjust my bar and brake/shifter angles
3. I need larger grips.

I don't remember cycling being this complex when I was a kid. You just got on whatever bike you had and rode around all day long.

Ian F (Forum Supporter)
Ian F (Forum Supporter) MegaDork
11/29/20 11:17 p.m.

In reply to Brett_Murphy (Ex-Patrón) :

Yeah... as kids we had a lot more flexible and resilient bodies. 

Dieselboss15
Dieselboss15 Reader
11/30/20 9:57 a.m.
Brett_Murphy (Ex-Patrón) said:


The seat on my bike is killing my backside.  I've put in about 32 miles on the bike, plus some work on the stationary bike during the week. The stationary bike has a wide, padded seat and it didn't seem bad. The real bike has a narrow, hard seat and my glutes are protesting it.

I'm hoping I get more used to it, but if not, I might need a different one.

oh, yours too?

Brett_Murphy (Ex-Patrón)
Brett_Murphy (Ex-Patrón) MegaDork
11/30/20 1:27 p.m.

In reply to Dieselboss15 :

Badly. I got measured at the bike shop, and it turns out my seat was 30mm too narrow. I picked up a new one immediately, and some biking undies.

ultraclyde (Forum Supporter)
ultraclyde (Forum Supporter) UltimaDork
11/30/20 2:38 p.m.

Bike fitting is a real thing, especially for a road bike where you maintain the same position for hours on end.  For mountain biking I find it less millimeter-critical because you are up moving around on the bike so much more. A lot of nagging pains while riding can be traced to improper fit setup. 
 

I had friends back in the day who dropped several  hundred bucks ( plus parts, if needed) on a pro fit session and swore by it. Last time I bought a road bike the shop had a trained fitter and I spent over $2k on a bike. I still had to spend a couple hundred bucks on parts to get the fit right though. I recorded all the measurements and use them as a guide for new bike setup now. 
 

for larger grips, check out Ergon brand. I love their wide flat grips on my mountain bikes. 

adam525i (Forum Supporter)
adam525i (Forum Supporter) HalfDork
11/30/20 2:39 p.m.

In reply to Brett_Murphy (Ex-Patrón) :

You will enjoy the biking undies! I couldn't tell if it was a Bontrager saddle on there but the models of theirs I have tried in the past always seemed narrow (WTB saddles as well), I'd imagine they have improved though in the last few years.

Edit - on the new bike setup front I have found a large drywall T-square makes things really easy to transfer between bikes (or to measure stack and reach on an unknown frame). I set it on the floor like an upside down T with the vertical part centered on the bottom bracket, from there I take measurements to the saddle and bars.

barefootskater (Shaun)
barefootskater (Shaun) UberDork
12/1/20 5:14 p.m.

Just finished a job and the guy pays, then asks, "You know anyone who wants a bike?" And points to a red bike hanging from hooks. 
 

So I pulled it down and made sure my short legs will work. "How much do you want? I don't have any cash on me."

"You don't need any."

 

Free road bike! I'm very unfamiliar with brands, models and values, but it says Japanese made and it's got frame mounted shifting. Ten speed. 80s? Idk. Needs a good cleaning and tires, but that's easy. Now I can ride with my boy (who doesn't know he's getting a new bike for Christmas)



Stoked!

EvanB (Forum Supporter)
EvanB (Forum Supporter) MegaDork
12/1/20 5:16 p.m.

In reply to barefootskater (Shaun) :

I'd buy that for free!

barefootskater (Shaun)
barefootskater (Shaun) UberDork
12/1/20 6:35 p.m.

In reply to EvanB (Forum Supporter) :

I figured it's got to be at least worth the price of new tires and a couple hours maintenance. 

ultraclyde (Forum Supporter)
ultraclyde (Forum Supporter) UltimaDork
12/1/20 6:51 p.m.

Bridgestone made some nice bikes back in the day. I'd guess that one is late 70s or early 80s. Sweet score!

02Pilot
02Pilot UltraDork
12/1/20 7:16 p.m.

I refurbed and sold a Bridgestone Kabuki a while back. As I recall it was a pretty solid, if slightly heavy, bike. Never rode it more than a test ride, so I can't really comment on it in any meaningful way. But good tires will make a significant difference for just about any bike, and I'd say those are well past due for replacing.

barefootskater (Shaun)
barefootskater (Shaun) UberDork
12/1/20 8:49 p.m.

In reply to 02Pilot :

It is pretty heavy. But it looks completely rust free and the front tire even has air still in it. Chain and cables need cleaned and lubed but they all seemed to move fairly well. I'm excited to get it home and give it a more thorough inspection. But it shows all signs of being stored very well. The guy I got it from was fairly elderly and his garage was very clean. It'll make a great winter project. 

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