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neon4891
neon4891 SuperDork
4/2/11 4:36 p.m.

I need help picking a router. Main use is wifi for my iphone when home, mostly video streaming, and net flix over my Wii. This will be used with a DSL modem.

And GO...

Dr. Hess
Dr. Hess SuperDork
4/2/11 5:31 p.m.

I think the BEST router is a Cradlepoint WiPipe. I've played with a bunch, and this one rocks.

1988RedT2
1988RedT2 Dork
4/2/11 9:02 p.m.

I've got one by D-Link. It works.

wlkelley3
wlkelley3 Dork
4/2/11 9:19 p.m.

Kids got me one from Netgear. It works and was easy to hook up.

fastEddie
fastEddie SuperDork
4/2/11 9:30 p.m.

I like my Cisco E2000. It's a nice middle of the road model, B/G/N support, UPnP, dual band (not simultaneous though), gigabit, etc.

I stream (over wire) from my WHS to my HTPC with no problems. Have yet to try from my WHS to my iPad but that is next on the list to do!

petegossett
petegossett SuperDork
4/3/11 7:55 a.m.

IME, all these newer "Linksys by Cisco" routers suck. I've seen many fail partially after just a couple years, and it's always a real pain diagnosing it - for example, the last one I dealt with had lost it's capacity to assign DHCP addresses(wirelessly or wired), but would work when manually configured. I had another which none of the physical ports would work, though I still had link lights from each of them, but wireless connections were fine!

mtn
mtn SuperDork
4/3/11 11:56 a.m.

I went to Wally World and bought the cheapest Belkin they had, which was also the cheapest one overall. I should have doubled what I was paying, the thing sucks. It needs to be unplugged every day and plugged back in.

So don't buy a cheap Belkin.

John Brown
John Brown SuperDork
4/3/11 3:34 p.m.
mtn wrote: I went to Wally World and bought the cheapest Belkin they had, which was also the cheapest one overall. I should have doubled what I was paying, the thing sucks. It needs to be unplugged every day and plugged back in. So don't buy a cheap Belkin.

I have the same piece of crap. I hooked up a power outlet strip to it and the modem and just before I turn on the computer I step on the power strip turn it off then back on.

This thread has my attention.

I was considering this:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833156249

Derick Freese
Derick Freese Dork
4/3/11 3:51 p.m.

Buy anything that can be flashed to DDwrt. Linksys hardware is great, but their firmware blows chunks. Asus does make some decent equipment, and it's pretty inexpensive. I've seen their DDwrt stuff for like $35 on sale.

Unless you're doing a lot of file transfers from one computer to another, don't bother with Wireless-N. It's mostly useless for internet connectivity.

Hocrest
Hocrest Reader
4/3/11 4:12 p.m.
Derick Freese wrote: Buy anything that can be flashed to DDwrt.

I've seen this recommendation before. What are the benefits of this? If my router is working fine is this something that would still be recommended?

Derick Freese
Derick Freese Dork
4/3/11 10:25 p.m.

If it's working fine and you don't need any other features, it's not a big deal. If you're having issues out of it, then it's worth a flash.

DDwrt is an aftermarket firmware written for the wrt54g series Linksys routers. Because so many routers run similar hardware, many routers are compatible. These days, there are some built specifically to run DDwrt. The wrt45gl was the first example of this that I can think of, but many other routers have gone this path as well because it's such solid firmware.

DDwrt adds quite a few features like the ability to run torrents and has far better stability and controls.

Check it out if you want something to mess with. http://www.dd-wrt.com/site/index

No floating required.

donalson
donalson SuperDork
4/3/11 11:57 p.m.

i've had good luck with the cheapo belkin from walmart (the old b/g model)... used it for over a year and rarely a problem (and usually it was the fault of the ISP)

also never had a problem with netgear.... ran a few of them and my old tech support days that was our default router... one of the easiest to setup if you are on auto DHCP (which most everything is for home ISP stuff these days)

I was running an old linksys 54gs till we got Uverse... it's at least 5 years old, a friend upgraded and I took it and flashed it to ddwrt worked flawlessly even with the transmitter boosted a bit

was given a D-link N router that I flashed to ddwrt and setup for my associate pastor (very non techy mac guy) and I haven't had a call about it (and I ALWAYS get tech calls from him for just about anything)

the only router i've ever had issues with was a newer linksys by cisco... which seems common :-/

so in my experience... skip the new linksys...

Keith
Keith SuperDork
4/4/11 12:05 a.m.

I picked up one during the Boxing Day sales (Dec 26th, big shopping day in Canada) for my parents a few years back. Paid $2 for it. As far as I know, it's been running without any interference or maintenance for at least 5 years. I don't even remember what kind it is. Like Donalson, I would have got a tech call if it had given trouble.

It replaced an Apple Airport - one of the original cool flying saucer ones that I think developed a power supply problem. So that's two routers since 1999. Not bad...

alex
alex SuperDork
4/4/11 10:49 a.m.

My Airport...Extreme(? it's the one that's the same size as their power bricks) base station is on its last legs I think, so I'm keeping an eye on this one, too.

My main concern is range. I used to get a signal from my network out in the garage - through a brick house, across 50' of yard, into a stick-built garage - which was really handy for working out there with internets at my grimy fingertips. Any recommendations that favor big range would be most welcome.

turboswede
turboswede SuperDork
4/4/11 2:15 p.m.

Bought a Linksys WRT610N after reading the early recommendations as I needed Wireless N to stream video effectively. Found the hardware was fine, the firmware from Linksys was crap. Upgraded to DD-WRT and it has worked flawlessly ever since. Before that, routine reboots to get it to work, etc.

One of the benefits of moving to DD-WRT for me is that I can now make full use of the USB connector on the router (plugged in an external drive and use the router as a Media Server) and bridging wireless networks more easily means I can setup another router downstairs to improve signal strength throughout the house.

DD-WRT is a replacement "operating system" for select routers and it is much more powerful and in many cases more reliable than the ones provided by the vendors. It is OpenSource so if there is an issue, it is usually resolved fairly quickly once discovered. Think of it as MegaSquirt for the wireless router crowd. Works pretty well out of the box, but has lots of options to grow into. The interface is easy, there is in depth information on nearly everything. http://www.dd-wrt.com Check the router database for any models you're interested in.

If I were buying a router again, I'd check to make sure it has external antennae as the internal ones cannot be aimed or replaced to improve the signal and whether DD-WRT is available for it.

Though I did buy a Belkin 54G wireless router for the Fiance's parents for $15 from Goodwill. Works perfectly for their use (limited to their iPhones and their guests when they are home, so everything is routed to the internet away from their PC)

One thing I've found when dealing with setting up wireless is that the wireless encryption methods aren't always implemented the same between manufacturers. I've had some wireless cards absolutely refuse to connect to a wireless AP or get a DHCP address even though everything is configured properly. To get around that I've had to step down in encryption strength or configure a manual IP address. The Wireless N card in a couple of my laptops has this issue with Apple Airports. Annoying, but I knew it was a chance I took when buying the cheapest cards I could :)

When setting up Wireless, expect that data sent over the air will be visible to anyone as the encryption can be broken. To reduce the potential exposure, use WPA2 encryption, with a strong password, do not broadcast your Wireless network ID (SSID) and use MAC address filtering (meaning only specific network cards can get a DHCP address). This isn't perfect as someone could spoof the MAC address and decrypt the network packets, but it is all you can do with the current technology available without adding another layer of encryption, etc.

ultraclyde
ultraclyde Reader
4/4/11 2:43 p.m.

I've been running a Linksys wireless-N model at the house for a couple years and had no issues. We've been using cradlepoint MBR1000 's in our LED billboards at work and they've survived really well. They're a 3G cellular unit and probably not what you'd want for the house, but I can testify that they're well built. Ours are in sealed plastic boxes mounted on top of the billboards...

cliff95
cliff95 New Reader
4/5/11 8:12 a.m.

The Linksys WRT54GL (the L being important) reliable once flashed with tomato firmware (or DD-WRT). Typically new about $50, refurbs for $30. It's the only router I will help setup for other people.

GameboyRMH
GameboyRMH SuperDork
4/5/11 2:22 p.m.

If you want one with gigabit ethernet, get a Buffalo WZR-HP-G300NH. I ordered one for myself recently. Runs commercial DD-WRT out of the box and can be reflashed with the community version.

John Brown
John Brown SuperDork
4/5/11 2:57 p.m.

RMH, what is the difference between the Buffalo Buffalo WZR-HP-G300NH and Buffalo WZR-HP-G300N?

turboswede
turboswede SuperDork
4/5/11 5:08 p.m.
John Brown wrote: RMH, what is the difference between the Buffalo Buffalo WZR-HP-G300NH and Buffalo WZR-HP-G300N?

An H

BoxheadTim
BoxheadTim SuperDork
4/5/11 6:02 p.m.

I've got an ASUS RT-N12 that's already flashed with DD-WRT if a GRMer wants a cheap DD-WRT capable router, because it's only cluttering up my office - I upgraded to a dual band access pointer a little while ago.

Derick Freese
Derick Freese Dork
4/5/11 10:43 p.m.

BoxheadTim's router is probably the best you're going to get for the price :p

Hocrest
Hocrest Reader
4/6/11 5:55 a.m.
BoxheadTim wrote: I've got an ASUS RT-N12 that's already flashed with DD-WRT if a GRMer wants a cheap DD-WRT capable router, because it's only cluttering up my office - I upgraded to a dual band access pointer a little while ago.

How much shipped to 18640?

GameboyRMH
GameboyRMH SuperDork
4/6/11 7:23 a.m.
John Brown wrote: RMH, what is the difference between the Buffalo Buffalo WZR-HP-G300NH and Buffalo WZR-HP-G300N?

The NH model's wired LAN is 10x faster - but keep in mind that unless you're doing system backups over your network or something geeky like that, you definitely don't need that much speed (your regular 100Mbps wired LAN transfers around 12 megs per second - the NH will do around 120 - that's a full CD in under 6 seconds!). The NH model also has multiple radios and some fancy anti-interference tech - which again, unless you're doing fancy stuff, you probably don't need.

The N model has changeable antennas while the NH model doesn't, so if you want to get lots of range this could be a plus.

So the G300N model would be a better deal if you aren't doing uber-l33t hacker stuff

Here's a feature comparison chart:

http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/wireless/wireless-reviews/30889-buffalo-nfiniti-wireless-n-high-power-router-a-access-point-reviewed

BoxheadTim
BoxheadTim SuperDork
4/8/11 6:57 p.m.

In reply to Hocrest:

I'll have to check on this - can you please PM me, I tried to PM your but your email addy doesn't seem to work.

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