2010 Volkswagen Golf new car reviews

The VW Golf gets a new look for 2010.The interior has been redone as well.
The interior has been redone as well.

Better than: previous base Golfs
But not as good as: a 2010 VW GTI
GRM Bang For The Buck Index: 75.04

The VW Golf has been a staple of the compact car scene for decades, and the sixth generation just made its debut. While its PQ35 chassis is carried over from the previous Golf, the shape has lost some of its boxiness. Not that we'd call the previous car dated, but the new look is fresh and current.

The new Golf, like the ones before it, can be equipped to handle different roles, from efficient family car to total hooligan. The 2.5-liter, inline-five engine is standard, although a TDI clean diesel engine is also available.

Our test car was fairly basic, as it had the five-cylinder engine and standard six-speed Tiptronic transmission. The only options were the power sunroof ($1000) and cold weather package ($225).

Other staff views

Tim Suddard Tim Suddard
Publisher

I was actually pretty impressed with this car. While certainly not exciting to look at, the fit, finish, form and function were all topnotch.

The car is comfortable and quiet, too. On a 500-mile trip got about 30 mpg at highway speed.

During that trip I only found one vice: the rear hatch handle is cleverly disguised as the VW badge. I guess if I owned the car I could quickly figure it out, but until I did, it made me angry that there was not a handle for the rear hatch.

Price wise, $21,165 is real money for a small plain car, but the VW is nicely made and would make a very practical family car for most people.

Per Schroeder Per Schroeder
PowerDork

We tested the sixth-generation Golf GTi at VIR last year and came away very impressed by the new chassis from Volkswagen. The driving dynamics and interior quality were top-notch. The base Golf has much of this same goodness with a gloriously upmarket interior, delightful seats and comfortable but competent handling. The car we tested topped $21,000—which is a bit much for basic transportation—but it came equipped with an automatic transmission and a sunroof. We'd probably forego these options and opt for a stick to stir up the throb of the five cylinder 2.5-liter engine. Another option we'd consider is going with the turbo-diesel option for better fuel economy or the Jetta wagon for more space. The take home message is that the new Golf (and Jetta) are on our short list of neat new cars.

Join Free Join our community to easily find more articles.

Comments

View comments on the GRM forums
getfast
getfast Reader
6/22/10 9:41 a.m.

I bought the clean diesel version of this car for a daily driver a few months ago ( http://grassrootsmotorsports.com/reader-rides/3759/ ). It was $24.3k out the door, I chose it instead of the equivalent GTI for about the same money. I never considered the base model Golf. The only other car I briefly considered was a base model Cooper S, but it didn't have enough room inside.

So far I have been quite impressed. The Golf TDI is german built not mexican built like the Jetta TDI, and it gains some "GTI-ish bits" that make it extra fun... namely stiffer suspension than the base model car, 17's with all season 225 Continentals, color touch screen audio with bluetooth, better seats, fog lights, etc. It also has, predictably, gobs of torks whenever you want 'em. Which is really neat for squirting out of a corner, or merging onto a highway, or passing someone on a highway... i.e. the real-world performance of the Golf TDI is much better than the 0-60 times (around 8 seconds) suggest.

Handling is decent, the chassis feels pretty stiff over bumps. It understeers of course, but careful corner entry fixes much of that. As would a better set of tires - the stock all season Continentals like to howl and really don't have a lot of grip. H&R has a 24mm adjustable rear swaybar available for the car, which should improve things nicely... I'll find out eventually.

I think the stock dampers are a bit soft especially in the rear, but that's to be expected. (Also keep in mind my last daily was an E36 M3 with Bilstein Sports!) My TDI will probably get Koni FSD's or similar at some point.

Stock brakes feel good, firm pedal with good modulation and not too "bitey"... also the stock pads aren't particularly dusty, which is nice.

Shifter is nice but a bit notchier than I prefer. Clutch is buttery smooth. Steering feel is good but not great (again, I'm coming from an E36 M3...) I'm not a fan of the factory ESP/ASR/e-diff nonsense - I wish the car had a real LSD, but I guess it's not intended to be an autocrosser. ;-)

As mentioned the interior is pretty nice. Fit and finish wise in general I've seen better from BMW and other high end brands, but that was on much more expensive cars. The hidden rear hatch release does confuse people, as does the fact that there is no visible key hole on any of the doors.

Anyway, after ~3k miles the car has turned in an average of 39mpg. That includes a whole lot of city driving with the a/c on. I'm regularly getting 600+ miles from 14.5 gallons of 45 cetane, and I'm certain the car could go 700 highway miles on one tank if I was capable of driving it gently. ;-) We'll see how it holds up, I'll probably only keep it for 4-5 years.

Long story short - this new "Mark 6" chassis is pretty neat, and all its iterations at various price points are definitely worth considering! (You can get into a base Golf for around $20k, but you can also spend nearly $30k on a fully optioned GTI.)

David S. Wallens
David S. Wallens Editorial Director
12/10/13 12:00 a.m.

The VW Golf has been a staple of the compact car scene for decades, and the sixth generation just made its debut. While its PQ35 chassis is carried over from the previous Golf, the shape has lost some of its boxiness. Not that we'd call the previous car dated, but the new look is fresh and current.

The new Golf, like the ones before it, can be equipped to handle different roles, from efficient family car to total hooligan. The 2.5-liter, inline-five engine is standard, although a TDI clean diesel engine is also available.

Our test car was fairly basic, as it had the five-cylinder engine and standard six-speed Tiptronic transmission. The only options were the power sunroof ($1000) and cold weather package ($225).

Grassroots Motorsports Magazine

Subscribe Today

Also get your instant access to the digital edition of Grassroots Motorsports Magazine!

Learn More
47TUrXWjmOPFoiOKTX6V4kf1uMLZCoYd