2013 Hyundai Genesis Coupe 3.8 Track new car reviews

Yep, it's rear-wheel drive.
The front styling is controversial, but everyone agrees it looks great from behind.

It's tempting to compare the Genesis Coupe to the Scion FR-S, but it's not really that. Its power and weight figures are both far greater than the Scion/Subaru twins (though the 4-cylinder Genesis comes in quite a bit cheaper and has double the Scion's torque).

But in reality, this is closer to the Nissan 370Z—especially with the 3.8-liter V6, as in the one we tested. The power and weight figures are similar. Both have looks only its designer could love (or at least it only looks good from certain angles).

And they both come in at a similar price. In fact, the Genesis 3.8 Track and the Nissan 370Z Sport, when both equipped with manual transmissions, are priced just $20 apart.

Hyundai has been working hard to earn respect in the eyes of American car buyers, but the enthusiast scene has yet to fall madly in love with it. Maybe a lack of history is helping the hesitation. What's the GRM collective think? See the comments below.

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Other staff views

Alan Cesar FartSmeller69
SuperDork

I liked this car. Even the automatic was enjoyable, with its firm, fast shifts. I'd definitely prefer the real three pedals, though. The big Brembo brakes are strong and confidence-inspiring.

I'm surprised how much car you get for this kind of money. Save three grand versus a Scion FR-S and yes, you get a lot more weight, but you also get double the torque. Double! And that's just the four-pot engine. The V6 makes more, but not so much that it seems worth the cost.

In fact, this car seems like an outright bargain in every lineup—until you look at a Mustang. Thirty grand buys you a Mustang GT. It's hard to argue with that V8. It's the same reason I wouldn't buy a Z car.

David S. Wallens David S. Wallens
Editorial Director

The first time I drove the Genesis Coupe I was intrigued but a little lukewarm. I remember the interior feeling a little on the cheap side.

Well, the improvements made have paid off. I totally dug this vehicle. It's fast enough. Nice interior. And it looks tough as nails. It looks way more deluxe than it is. So, this or a 370Z or FR-S/BRZ? Nice to have some choices again, huh?

Personally, I really want to drive the 2.0T. Can less money still equal a nice punch?

Darren Vannoy Darren Vannoy

There is no doubting Hyundai's improvement over the past ten years and the Genesis is no exception to the rule. Having just spent time in a Scion FR-S the week before, I was very eager to get behind the wheel of Hyundai's sports car. Lets face it--there really is no comparison. The Hyundai is in a completely separate league.

I thoroughly enjoyed my time spent in the Genesis. The 2013 has an exotic appearing exterior that takes some getting used to--it definitely turns heads. The interior has plenty of room yet still retains that sports car feel we all know and love. The 3.8-litre V6 has plenty of power and has a nice grunt to it, even in stock form. Though we don't have a plethora of curvy roads in Florida, I left each interstate on-ramp with a grin on my face.

There has to be a downside to all of this though, right? With the transmission in sport mode, shifts are quite delayed which became annoying enough to just leave the car in drive. I thought road noise inside the cabin was excessive, perhaps a different set of tires could help with this.

Hyundai was also kind enough to grace the Genesis with a torque gauge, because everyone should know how much torque their engine is producing at any given time.

All in all the Genesis is a great car for the money and is a blast to drive. Well played, Hyundai.

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Comments
View comments on the GRM forums
ZOO
ZOO UltraDork
9/27/13 11:55 a.m.

Plus one on the sound of the V6. I had a student at a track event with one and I was very impressed with all aspects of the car. Not my cup of tea, but that's not a statement about the car itself.

belteshazzar
belteshazzar UberDork
10/7/13 7:11 p.m.

idk what all is different about the latest version, but last week I saw a 2012 V6 example at auction bring $20k. my bidding hand was itching!

Alan Cesar
Alan Cesar SuperDork
12/10/13 12:00 a.m.

It's tempting to compare the Genesis Coupe to the Scion FR-S, but it's not really that. Its power and weight figures are both far greater than the Scion/Subaru twins (though the 4-cylinder Genesis comes in quite a bit cheaper and has double the Scion's torque).

But in reality, this is closer to the Nissan 370Z—especially with the 3.8-liter V6, as in the one we tested. The power and weight figures are similar. Both have looks only its designer could love (or at least it only looks good from certain angles).

And they both come in at a similar price. In fact, the Genesis 3.8 Track and the Nissan 370Z Sport, when both equipped with manual transmissions, are priced just $20 apart.

Hyundai has been working hard to earn respect in the eyes of American car buyers, but the enthusiast scene has yet to fall madly in love with it. Maybe a lack of history is helping the hesitation. What's the GRM collective think? See the comments below.

Like what you read here? You can get a whole magazine full of these types of articles delivered to your home or shop 8 times a year. Subscribe now or visit the Grassroots Motorsports online store for back issues.

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