California Restores “Fix-It” Tickets for Exhausts

California—the state with perhaps the most automotive enthusiasts per capita—recently reinstated "fix-it" tickets for vehicles with exhaust systems suspected of being over the state's limit. The SEMA-supported legislation gives owners 30 days to correct the issue after being issued a 'fix-it" ticket, restoring due process.

Read the press release below, and leave a comment.

California Bill To Amend 2018 Exhaust Noise Law Signed by Governor

SEMA-Supported Legislation Restores “Fix-It” Tickets for Cars Suspected of Violating State’s Exhaust Noise Limit —

DIAMOND BAR, Calif. (Sept. 30, 2019) — California Governor Gavin Newsom signed into law SEMA-supported legislation (SB 112) that immediately restores “fix-it” tickets for cars suspected of violating the state’s exhaust noise limit and allows car owners 30 days to correct violations. SB 112 amends a 2018 law (AB 1824) that removed this ability and which generated significant concern within the specialty automotive aftermarket industry and enthusiast community.

On behalf of the over 1,700 SEMA member companies in California, SEMA thanks Gov. Newsom for signing this critical legislation into law,” said Daniel Ingber, SEMA’s Vice President for Legal and Government Affairs. “With his signature, Gov. Newsom restored due process for motorists in the Golden State.”

SB 112, a budget implementation (trailer) bill, includes text drawn from SEMA-sponsored AB 390, which was authored by Assembly Members Jim Frazier (D-Discovery Bay) and Tim Grayson (D-Concord) in early 2019. Under normal legislative procedure, AB 390 would not have been implemented until January 2020. SB 112 is effective immediately.

SB 112 was championed in the legislature by Assembly Members Grayson, Tasha Boerner Horvath (D-Oceanside), Phil Ting (D-San Francisco), Phil Chen (R-Diamond Bar), and Senator Holly Mitchell (D-Los Angeles).

Since 2003, exhaust systems installed on motor vehicles in California with a manufacturer’s gross vehicle weight rating of less than 6,000 pounds, other than motorcycles, may not exceed a sound level of 95-decibels when tested under a Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) procedure. SB 112 does not change this.

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Stefan
Stefan MegaDork
10/2/19 9:09 a.m.

I really, really hate that they exclude motorcycles and the diesel trucks.

I do like that they are cracking down a bit.  You can still make a decent noise at 95db.

Sorry, but as much as I love a nice exhaust note, including PP rotaries, so many take that to extremes though and it's unnecessary outside of a racetrack.

Cotton
Cotton PowerDork
10/2/19 9:22 a.m.

This is where dual mode exhausts really shine or electric cutouts.

spandak
spandak Reader
10/2/19 9:37 a.m.

This is good news. I’m so tired of V6 Mustangs and Challengers blowing my ears out. 

Cooter
Cooter UltraDork
10/2/19 9:58 a.m.

In reply to Stefan :

The existing regulations on motorcycle exhausts are stricter than this-

 

A noise limit of 92 decibels applies to any motorcycle manufactured before 1970.

A noise limit of 88 decibels applies to motorcycles manufactured after 1969 and before 1973; 86 decibels applies to motorcycles manufactured after 1972 and before 1975; 83 decibels applies to motorcycles manufactured after 1974 and before 1986; 80 decibels applies to motorcycles manufactured after 1985.

Motorcycles registered in the state that are manufactured on or after 2013 or have an aftermarket exhaust system manufactured on or after 2013 must have the federal EPA noise emission label affixed to it in order to be operated, used, or parked in the state

dclafleur
dclafleur Reader
10/2/19 10:18 a.m.

Shoot that's a higher limit than Laguna Seca, although I suspect it is measured at a closer distance.

aircooled
aircooled MegaDork
10/2/19 10:25 a.m.
Cooter said:

In reply to Stefan :

....A noise limit of 92 decibels applies to any motorcycle manufactured before 1970.

A noise limit of 88 decibels applies to motorcycles manufactured after 1969 and before 1973; 86 decibels applies to motorcycles manufactured after 1972 and before 1975; 83 decibels applies to motorcycles manufactured after 1974 and before 1986; 80 decibels applies to motorcycles manufactured after 1985.

Motorcycles registered in the state that are manufactured on or after 2013 or have an aftermarket exhaust system manufactured on or after 2013 must have the federal EPA noise emission label affixed to it in order to be operated, used, or parked in the state

 

Hahahahahahahah... you made a funny.

Having a law, and ENFORCING a law, are completely different realities (especially in this case).

Vigo
Vigo MegaDork
10/2/19 10:30 a.m.

This change is good news in the sense of it being less-bad news than expected. In other words, having to fight back against something that shouldn't need to be fought if noone was berkeleying with it in the first place. Great success, truly a windfall of salvage!

When i went to CA i was most bothered by people pollution.  Luckily CA has an answer for that too, legislating all sorts of knicks and knacks so that nowhere near enough new housing is built, leaving mostly the  bottom 9/10ths of the top 1% (the part that still pay income taxes) able to move in.  Brilliant. 

As a Texan i have NO IDEA how many dB are coming out of the back of any of the cars i've ever had, ever.  IGNORANT TEXAN!

 

Those noise limits for motorcycles are hilarious. 

Fueled by Caffeine
Fueled by Caffeine MegaDork
10/2/19 10:54 a.m.

In reply to aircooled :

noone enforces noise ordinances on harley's..   Sitting outside at a local pub is horrible in the summer... everytime there is a red light you gotta yell to your tablemates  thanks to so many people saving lives with their loud pipes..

_
_ HalfDork
10/2/19 11:15 a.m.

How do we go about getting the bro dozers banned? I want 95db on those A-holes. 

Cooter
Cooter UltraDork
10/2/19 11:31 a.m.

In reply to aircooled :

Changing the subject by deleting part of the comment doesn't change the facts.

The discussion was about the fact that motorcycles were excluded from the 95db limit that autos were held to.

I responded by proving that motorcycles have a lower db threshold already written into the law, which is what the conversation was about.


Enforcement is another story entirely, as both autos and motorcycles don't get pulled over very often for loud exhausts.  One of the reasons for this is the fact that the officer has to have a Calibrated DB Meter to enforce it.   Which they don't have.



Please try to keep this on track, and a little less insulting when facts are presented.  Thanks.
 

aircooled
aircooled MegaDork
10/2/19 12:11 p.m.

I am not laughing at you, I am laughing at the law enforcement.  I am laughing at the fact that those laws existing make no actual difference.  Your point is entirely fine and correct.  Cars are now not excluded, motorcycles have not been excluded.  Didn't make any difference before, won't now. 

They can make any laws they like, but if they don't (or can't) enforce them (which is, in general, is a fact in this case), you effectively don't have those laws.

Knurled.
Knurled. MegaDork
10/2/19 8:19 p.m.

I'm okay with this.

 

 

Vigo
Vigo MegaDork
10/2/19 10:39 p.m.

They can make any laws they like, but if they don't (or can't) enforce them (which is, in general, is a fact in this case), you effectively don't have those laws.

Any law that's generally not enforced is a great ingredient for creating inequitable prosecution. The more arrows in the quiver, the more likely that someone will get E36 M3 on for the same offense that someone else didn't even get charged for. 

poopshovel again
poopshovel again MegaDork
10/3/19 6:11 a.m.
 INGO!Vigo said:

They can make any laws they like, but if they don't (or can't) enforce them (which is, in general, is a fact in this case), you effectively don't have those laws.

Any law that's generally not enforced is a great ingredient for creating inequitable prosecution. The more arrows in the quiver, the more likely that someone will get E36 M3 on for the same offense that someone else didn't even get charged for. 

BINGO!

Kreb
Kreb UberDork
10/3/19 9:46 a.m.

Reminds me of the time that I was on a nice stretch of twisty road - with a known speed trap. I was one turn before the trap, and a cafe racer came screaming around that corner fast as blazes. I thought, "great, he'll clear out the cops" and increased my speed from the legal 25 to 35 or so.

Another half mile down I get pulled over. "Wait, the motorcycle was going twice my speed!" Cop: "I can't catch him. You I can catch."

My point being that if you're going to have laws, you have to enforce them. Do do otherwise is to increase the overall disdain people have for the gubberment. 

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