Apr 16, 2009 update to the Mazda Miata Turbo project car

Gangsta Wrapper

Here's our test subject. Once it was removed from the car, we quickly cleaned off the road grime.
We started our wrap from the downstream end of the pipe. We admit that it's a minor detail, but this way the wind will flow along with the overlapping layers while the car is in motion.
We wrapped once all the way around the diameter of the pipe before beginning to work toward the opposite end.
After we had about three revolutions of the wrap in place, we used one of the DEI stainless steel locking ties to secure the end. Once we were sure the wrap was complete, we added a second locking tie to provide some extra security.
When we came to the O2 sensor bung, we simply wrapped once on either side of the obstruction. The DEI wrap easily conformed around irregularities like this one.
Once we got to the end of the pipe, we simply cut the excess wrap with a pair of sharp scissors.
We installed a pair of locking ties at the upstream end to keep the wrap securely in place. One would have probably been sufficient, but we like a bit of overkill.

We’ve been making a lot of small improvements to our turbocharged Miata project car. This week, we used the new Titanium Exhaust Wrap from Design Engineering, Inc., to contain some of the heat emanating from our Miata’s downpipe. The benefit of this is twofold: Not only does the wrap reduce heat transfer to surrounding components, but it also helps the exhaust flow by maintaining higher temperatures inside the pipe.

According to DEI’s Web site, the Titanium Exhaust Wrap is made using pulverized lava rock that’s been extruded into fibers and woven into the wrap material. This new process raises the wrap’s temperature rating to 1800 degrees Fahrenheit, which is about 30 percent higher than that offered by conventional wrap materials. Installation is also a little easier than with competitive products; DEI says the wrap doesn’t need to be soaked in water before installation to achieve a tight fit.

The wrapping process was pretty easy, since our downpipe is a much simpler shape than an exhaust manifold. All told, the job only took about an hour. We didn’t have any trouble, but you may want to wear gloves during the installation if you have sensitive skin.

We’ve also been meaning to replace the Miata’s engine mounts. Since the downpipe is out of the car, we’ll give that job a shot this week. Watch for more updates as we make progress.

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Tom Heath
Tom Heath UberDork
4/16/09 11:20 a.m.

We've been making a lot of small improvements to our turbocharged Miata project car. This week, we used the new Titanium Exhaust Wrap from Design Engineering, Inc., to contain some of the heat emanating from our Miata's downpipe. The benefit of this is twofold: Not only does the wrap reduce heat transfer to surrounding components, but it also helps the exhaust flow by maintaining higher temperatures inside the pipe.

According to DEI's Web site, the Titanium Exhaust Wrap is made using pulverized lava rock that's been extruded into fibers and woven into the wrap material. This new process raises the wrap's temperature rating to 1800 degrees Fahrenheit, which is about 30 percent higher than that offered by conventional wrap materials. Installation is also a little easier than with competitive products; DEI says the wrap doesn't need to be soaked in water before installation to achieve a tight fit.

The wrapping process was pretty easy, since our downpipe is a much simpler shape than an exhaust manifold. All told, the job only took about an hour. We didn't have any trouble, but you may want to wear gloves during the installation if you have sensitive skin.

We've also been meaning to replace the Miata's engine mounts. Since the downpipe is out of the car, we'll give that job a shot this week. Watch for more updates as we make progress.

4cylndrfury
4cylndrfury MegaDork
5/5/09 2:41 p.m.
GRM Mag said We’ve also been meaning to replace the Miata’s engine mounts. Since the downpipe is out of the car, we’ll give that job a shot this week. Watch for more updates as we make progress.

well its been more than a week! wheres my motor mount update? ;) I like that new stuff...beats the heck outa fiberglass!

Tom Heath
Tom Heath UberDork
5/11/09 3:37 p.m.

Look for the motor mount writeup in the August issue of GRM. A blown coolant line on a heater hose made the mount job a necessity.

The short version- it was successful, and the new Mazdaspeed mounts are much better than the worn original pieces.

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