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TVR Scott
TVR Scott GRM+ Memberand HalfDork
10/30/19 10:59 a.m.

Yeah, I had them backwards in my mind.  One wire coolant, three wire oil pressure.

Ransom
Ransom GRM+ Memberand UltimaDork
10/30/19 11:02 a.m.
TVR Scott said:

My intention was to put the oil pressure sender into one of the ports on the dual oil filter assembly.  This will be immediately downstream of the engine block and before the oil cooler.

I thought flow was normally pump->filter->engine... and that the sender needed to be between filter and engine to be meaningful because the pressure you're paying attention to is built up between the pump and the restriction of the engine's tolerances. So that a weak pump, plugged filter, or opening tolerances all show as low pressure. But this filter assembly is downstream of the engine? I suppose the simplest answer is that I'm just misinformed...

TVR Scott
TVR Scott GRM+ Memberand HalfDork
10/30/19 12:47 p.m.

In reply to Ransom :

I think I can plumb the sensor in to the output side of the filter.  There are npt ports on both sides of the filter housing, for both infeed and out.

The pump picks up from the oil pan, flows straight to the filter, and then channels to the engine block.

Am I missing something?  Certainly possible I am.

Ransom
Ransom GRM+ Memberand UltimaDork
10/30/19 1:47 p.m.

In reply to TVR Scott :

I think I just misunderstood what you meant by "downstream of the engine block." What you're describing in the latest post sounds exactly like what I'd have expected.

TVR Scott
TVR Scott GRM+ Memberand HalfDork
10/30/19 2:41 p.m.

In reply to Ransom :

Ok, cool.  I'll take a few pictures as I lay everything out, and you can check my work.  I'm all about having another set of eyes on everything!

TVR Scott
TVR Scott GRM+ Memberand HalfDork
10/31/19 6:15 p.m.

Wacky week.  Big storm came blowing thru on Sunday night, and it sort of didn't stop until Weds morning.  The kids had a two-hour delayed start on Monday, a surprise early-release at noon on Tues, and the whole day off on Weds.  We had a solid 10" in the backyard.  Big storm for October!

The Focus wearing it's snow tires.

The dog much less happy about his winter footwear:

Finished up the fab on that coolant pipe this afternoon.  I'm really liking the Lanthanated Tungsten.  Really nice control.

Then I annealed the ends and used my crimper pliers to roll a bead.  More details to follow.

Here's the pipe installed:

I printed this overflow bottle holder the other day.  My initial impression was it was a bit too Gaudi and weird looking, but I'm getting used to it.  I may yet redo it.

That's it for now!

TVR Scott
TVR Scott GRM+ Memberand HalfDork
11/5/19 11:08 a.m.

Sneaking in a little bit of car work this morning before I leave for almost two weeks in Spain.  Rough, these business trips...

I wanted to show my process for annealing the ends of the aluminum coolant pipes.  The tube I had was 6061-T6 temper (hard) and would not take an end-bead without cracking.  The 6061-0 temper (soft) mandrel bends that I bought easily crimp to an end bead.  I did steal this specific method from a guy on you-tube, but it can be done with different tools and in different ways.

Here's the layout.  Left to right: Coffee, safety glasses, creme brulee torch, modified bead-forming pliers, coolant pipe, tapered candle (stolen from cabinet-o-fancy-stuff):

Step 1 - Light the candle and hold the tube-end into the flame.  If you do it right the flame will wrap around the tube and deposit loads of soot.  That's what you're going for.

Rotate the tube and cover the whole bead area.

Step 2.  Light your creme-brulee torch and heat the tube end.  As the tube heats, the soot will start dissapearing.  The soot is burning off as the tube reaches the annealing temp.  We're talking roughly 750 deg F.  Burn off all the soot.

Once the tube end is clean again, let it cool off a bit.  It is now in the annealed (zero-temper) condition.  The tube will now happily deform with the bead rolling tool.

Done!

Afterward:  Not really done.

All these tubes I've welded up are now in a zero-temper state.  In engineering terms, that means they have about a 10,000 psi yield strength and the fatigue strength basically sucks.  Not good.

Before I put the car together and start to run it, I'll be taking all these parts to the heat-treater to get heat treated back to the T6 condition.  This is a relatively simple process that realigns the grain structure in the metal and makes it uniformly strong again.  Yield strength in 6061-T6 - around 40,000 psi.  And the fatigue toughness is restored.  Better.

Disclaimer: I'm not a metallurgist or a teacher.  This is basic info meant to illuminate why I'm doing what I'm doing.  If you want to know more good info on this kind of thing, I'd recommend Engineer to Win by Carroll Smith.  When I need a refresher, that's where I go.

Ransom
Ransom GRM+ Memberand UltimaDork
11/5/19 11:29 a.m.

In reply to TVR Scott :

Very cool! Looking forward to your experience in going to a heat treater with a one-off hobby part; not that your heat treater and anyone around here will be the same to deal with. Also curious about technical details (I'm sure Mr Smith or a quick search could answer this, but I find myself wondering what, if anything, one needs to do to prevent deformation during heat treating. I have vague notions of some applications requiring a jig, though I suppose a coolant tube mounted in hoses doesn't have the same dimensional requirements that some parts might. Maybe plugs to keep the ends round? I don't know how soft aluminum goes at heat treat temps).

TVR Scott
TVR Scott GRM+ Memberand HalfDork
11/5/19 11:37 a.m.

In reply to Ransom :

My understanding on deformation is this: where you see it a lot is in frames and weldments that are one-sided in dimensions.  Like a big open c-shaped structure.  Or areas where thick sections and thin come together.  Gravity can be a factor - like if you had a bridge-like structure.

Based on previous discussions I've had, I doubt that my tubes will change much at all in heat-treating.  But I guess we'll find out!

TVR Scott
TVR Scott GRM+ Memberand HalfDork
11/17/19 1:35 p.m.

Just got back from Spain last night after an almost two-week business trip.  I was finishing and commissioning  this small piece of mobile mining equipment.  I bought the truss and a few small parts, (and obviously the JD Gator) but otherwise I designed, machined, welded, and assembled everything on it.  A mountain of work and very satisfying to have it done.

The testing went well, and the workmen are happy.  I'm looking forward to getting back into some TVR work.  Time to head out the garage and unload my tool bag.

TVR Scott
TVR Scott GRM+ Memberand HalfDork
11/19/19 4:23 p.m.

Ok, real work on the real car.

My next goal is to lift the body off the chassis, so I spent some of yesterday and today removing the connecting bolts.  They were almost all seized and terrible.

There are a total of ten - four in the front foot-wells, four under the seats (that also connect seat-belts), and two behind the rear axle and in front of the gas tank.

I already had the four under the seats out.  Those came out early on when I stripped out the seats and belts.

On the foot-well bolts, three came off and I had to drill out the fourth.  Great grunting and tiredness ensued.

The bolts in the back are both welded to backing plates.  Unfortunately these backing plates will happily rip right thru the fiberglass body when enough torque is applied.  Ask me how I know.

So out came the Nut-Splitter.  One split:

And a second one:

I've not always had great luck with the nut-splitter, but today it chewed thru these like nothing.  Only moderate grunting was required.

There's a bracket that runs from each of the rear upper trailing arm pivots and picks up the seatbelt bolts.  These came off easily, though strangely all the bolts and nuts were combinations of different sizes.  I had to use 5/8, 11/16/ and 3/4 wrenches in different combinations.  All for 1/2-20 bolts.

I think once I have the steering shaft disconnected I should be ready to lift.  Gotta figure out mounting points for lifting straps - I really don't want to get it in the air and have the fiberglass blow out and drop the whole thing.  That would be a bad day.

In different news, I heard out of the blue from the PO today.  He just texted me to see how it was going.  I sent him some updated pictures, and he sent me an old pic from a car show in the 80's.

It's still got the heater box at this point.  And I like the fog lights down front.  Fun to have a bit of history.

TVR Scott
TVR Scott GRM+ Memberand HalfDork
11/20/19 6:35 p.m.

Set up the hoist and ran straps.  Gave it a careful test lift.

The hoist maxed out at about 600 lb, which was pretty good for it's 440 lb rating.

The body didn't move too much except for unloading the suspension.  No drama. I'm good with that.

Probably will pick up a cheap chain hoist and do the lift two sided.  I don't really want to take out the glass - no where to store it right now.

TVR Scott
TVR Scott GRM+ Memberand HalfDork
11/23/19 11:05 a.m.

I did a bunch of searching for how to remove the body from a TVR.  It's getting a bit weird doing searches on this kind of thing - about half the results show parts of this thread.

I found some vague references to a frame/body interference that would prevent a straight vertical lift, but I'd never seen something specific.  So I went looking for issues.  Found it.

Really hard to photograph and describe, but here goes.

This is looking straight down in the engine bay on the passenger's side.  The footwell flares out at the bottom, while the frame tube hasn't yet tapered back.  That's the interference.

So here's today's plan (love me some bullet points).

  1. Disconnect parking brake handle.  (another small interference).
  2. Remove cribbing from car and lower down to the floor.
  3. Hook up new 1 ton chain fall to back end of body, hook 400 lb host to front
  4. Lift back end independently to clear front interference.  Roll chassis fwd to allow full removal.
  5. Lift body onto work-stands and bask in glory.
  6. Dinner.

Ready.... Go!

TVR Scott
TVR Scott GRM+ Memberand HalfDork
11/23/19 4:15 p.m.

Well I got thru the first three steps.

The hand brake bolts took forever to get off. I genuinely can't wait to have all new hardware on the car.

Got the car lowered back to the floor:

Did a little test lifting and I want to mess with the mounting points. Not bad.

Called it a day and headed to the movie theater with the family to see "Ford vs Ferrari". No spoilers!

TVR Scott
TVR Scott GRM+ Memberand HalfDork
11/24/19 5:42 p.m.

Ahhhhh.

The worst part was getting the steering shaft to release.  Once that popped loose the body came off pretty easily.

I still have adjustment for another 4" of height on the saw-horse, and I'd like to use it all.  My lifting devices are running out of travel, so I need to play with that a bit.

Otherwise, chassis looks dirty but solid.  Didn't find any additional rust-thru points.  I certainly won't run out of work now!

NOHOME
NOHOME MegaDork
11/24/19 6:00 p.m.

Are you going to blow this apart to the bare chassis and build up from there?

 

Pete

Dusterbd13-michael
Dusterbd13-michael MegaDork
11/24/19 6:02 p.m.

now is the perfect time for a pressure washer and POR15

TVR Scott
TVR Scott GRM+ Memberand HalfDork
11/24/19 6:20 p.m.
NOHOME said:

Are you going to blow this apart to the bare chassis and build up from there?

 

Pete

Yes. Everything is coming apart. Inspect, paint, new bushings and hardware. The R200 diff and axles will finally go in.

Frame will get painted as well as the underside of the body.

TVR Scott
TVR Scott GRM+ Memberand HalfDork
11/25/19 7:42 a.m.
Dusterbd13-michael said:

now is the perfect time for a pressure washer and POR15

Also, I thought real hard about POR15, but picked up a pint can of Rustoleum instead.  I've had lots of good experience with the Rustoleum in the past on trailers that live outside 24/7.  And I like that I can roll it on and touch it up as I need.  And another can is right over at Home Depot.

I just don't have any experience with the POR15.

NOHOME
NOHOME MegaDork
11/25/19 8:40 a.m.

If I had the opportunity of  a clean blasted chassis. I would epoxy coat it and either call it done or topcoat with color of choice.

POR works as advertised and one thing it does very  well is to lie down flat after brush application. I actually have the solvent required to spray the stuff, but chickened out thinking of the haze in the air and how it sticks to stuff for ever. POR is a colossal PITA to store unused portion requiring CO2 blanket in the can and refrigeration.

 

Pete

TVR Scott
TVR Scott GRM+ Memberand HalfDork
11/25/19 8:45 a.m.

In reply to NOHOME :

You pretty well described my concerns with POR - a pain to store and a bit messy.  The Rustoleum, for me, is a known quantity.

What did you mean by epoxy coating?  There a product you've successfully used?

NOHOME
NOHOME MegaDork
11/25/19 9:10 a.m.

In reply to TVR Scott :

Pretty much any two part ( catalyzed) epoxy primer from the major manufactures is going to be better than Rustoleum. Epoxy is not only watertight, but it is tough stuff that sticks to what you put it on. I used a Chromated epoxy from BASF when I did the Molvo because it is the best stuff to ward off future corrosion, but I understand that the health warnings are not trivial.

Peter

TVR Scott
TVR Scott GRM+ Memberand HalfDork
11/25/19 9:26 a.m.

That stuff looks serious.

I'm going to debate this one in my head a lot.  It is Colorado.  Low humidity, and not much rain.  I'm not going to drive the car in the snow and get mag-cloride all over it.  Stuff just doesn't rust much here, unless you're talking about 80's Toyota trucks.

But a bare frame does offer an opportunity to go crazy with coatings.

I'll ponder it while I'm scrubbing surface rust.

Dusterbd13-michael
Dusterbd13-michael MegaDork
11/25/19 10:27 a.m.

Valspar rust tough has proven far more durable to chips and abuse than rustoleum for what its worth. Available at lowes.

TVR Scott
TVR Scott GRM+ Memberand HalfDork
11/25/19 9:13 p.m.

In reply to Dusterbd13-michael :

I'll give the whole coating question more thought. Still lots of time to decide.

In the meantime, today I removed the drive shaft, disconnected the axles, and removed about fifty pounds of surface rust, oil, and old frame paint.

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