1 2 3
Ron_Sutton
Ron_Sutton New Reader
6/4/18 10:22 a.m.

Car Year & Model: 70 Ford Mustang Fastback
Competing in: Track Car & Occasional NASA TTU races
Front Clip/Suspension: GT Track-Warrior
Rear Clip/Suspension: GT Track-Warrior
Engine: Track-Warrior 3 LS7 700 HP
Trans: PPG Sequential Shift T56 6-Speed
Brakes: StopTech 14” ST60/ST40
Owner: Greg Weld
Builder: Randy Chastain – One Off Customs

This dyno sheet is Greg's engine.  It is our "Track Warrior 3 LS7".

You can see a detailed list of all the internal components in our catalog HERE.

Three things should stand out ...
1.  The build components are almost overkill for "only" 700hp.  That's to increase longevity.
2.  The ARE dry sump is simply the best dry sump & best protection for the engine in a car with high G's.  
3.  The power curve is relatively "linear" which makes these engines easier to drive fast.   

A few other notes:
A.  The "dead on" dyno at Scoggin-Dickey shows 707hp.  It will make 8-11 more horsepower once we we change the oil from Driven BR break-in Oil to Driven LS oil.
B.  We did NOT dyno the engine with step headers. If we did the top end power would be the same, but the power band from 2500 to 6000 would show higher & even flatter.  
C.  Greg's headers are the RSRT "tuned" Step Headers ... 1-3/4" to 1-7/8" to 2.0" and will have that additional power from 2500 to 6000 & be even more linear.  
D.  This same engine with the very basic, single stage GM OEM LS7 dry sump makes about 15 less HP.  
E.  The happy window power curve on this particular Track-Warrior engine is 2500-7500rpm on track.

The Front end, hood & doors mount this week.  Powertrain next week.  Still on track to track test June 28th.  smiley

 

 

Ron_Sutton
Ron_Sutton New Reader
6/4/18 10:34 a.m.
DeadSkunk said:

Ron, in the earlier build photos of the Mustang there's a full width cross member right in front of the rear frame kick-up, complete with a nice U-shaped cutout. Later photos it's gone. Would the rear axle have enough droop for the drive shaft to contact that area, or was it removed for another reason?

Howdy!  Good Question.

On many of our client's cars (without full belly pans) with 3.5"-5" rear frame heights, we run the full rear crossmember with a driveshaft loop.  The 3" or 3.5" exhaust can route under the frame if we use oval tubing (2" to 2.5" tall) or weld "pass thrus" in the cross member for round tubing. 

On our GT Track-Warriors, we run a full smooth belly pan for aerodynamics.  With a full belly pan, the exhaust needs to go above or below the belly pan ... above is preferred for aero reasons.  We typically place the frame height at only 3.5" so a 3.5" round exhaust can not go below the cross member, as it would rub on the track.  Oval tubing would fit, but it negatively affects the airflow under the car.  So in our GT Track-Warriors, like this 70 Wide Body Mustang, we run the exhaust in the driveline tunnel, just above the belly pan.  

So ... no driveshaft issues.  Exhaust & belly pan are the reasons. 

Ron_Sutton
Ron_Sutton New Reader
6/4/18 1:47 p.m.

Car Year & Model: 70 Ford Mustang Fastback
Competing in: Track Car & Occasional NASA TTU races
Front Clip/Suspension: GT Track-Warrior
Rear Clip/Suspension: GT Track-Warrior
Engine: Track-Warrior 3 LS7 700 HP
Trans: PPG Sequential Shift T56 6-Speed
Brakes: StopTech 14” ST60/ST40
Owner: Greg Weld
Builder: Randy Chastain – One-Off Customs

I'm back from my 10-day family vacation in Yosemite.  While the awesome crew at SDPC Raceshop & my EFI Guru Scott Clark were wrapping up the LS7 engine ... Randy Chastain at One-Off Customs made a LOT of progress on the car.  See photos below!

JeremyJ
JeremyJ New Reader
6/4/18 2:43 p.m.

Christ, that looks gorgeous. There's just something so sexy about old cars with modern race car form and function. Or should I say, modern race cars with old car aesthetics. Either way = win. 

Ron_Sutton
Ron_Sutton New Reader
6/4/18 3:14 p.m.

Quick Contest !

First 3 people to accurately list what the 6 items are in the photo, get a free RSRT T-shirt.
* Shipped free anywhere in the 48 continental US states.
** Contest ends June 15th, or when we have 3 winners, which ever comes first.

Ron_Sutton
Ron_Sutton New Reader
6/8/18 5:25 p.m.

Car Year & Model: 70 Ford Mustang Fastback
Competing in: Track Car & Occasional NASA TTU races
Front Clip/Suspension: GT Track-Warrior
Rear Clip/Suspension: GT Track-Warrior
Engine: Track-Warrior 3 LS7 700 HP
Trans: PPG Sequential Shift T56 6-Speed
Brakes: StopTech 14” ST60/ST40
Owner: Greg Weld
Builder: Randy Chastain – One-Off Customs

More progess = more photos !  We're on track with this car for initial testing in 20 days !!!

Steel wheel tubs

Dash with Autometer Digital Dash system, including data acquisition.

Front end, hood & doors mock up for fitment
* Reminder:  This 70 Fastback is widened 6".  3" per side.  Greenhouse (Roof) is factory width.

Tilt & Telescoping collapsible safety steering column.

Here are the StopTech Brakes optimized by Ron Sutton

Ron_Sutton
Ron_Sutton New Reader
6/13/18 6:52 p.m.

Car Year & Model: 70 Ford Mustang Fastback

Competing in: Track Car & Occasional NASA TTU races
Front Clip/Suspension: GT Track-Warrior
Rear Clip/Suspension: GT Track-Warrior
Engine: Track-Warrior 3 LS7 700 HP
Trans: PPG Sequential Shift T56 6-Speed
Brakes: StopTech 14” ST60/ST40
Owner: Greg Weld
Builder: Randy Chastain – One Off Customs

More updates & photos ...
Most of the stuff is straight out of our "Build-Your-Own Track-Car Catalog" HERE

The RSRT Track-Warrior 3 LS7 built by SDPC Race Shop - Details HERE

PPG Sequential T56 6-speed Trans, built by Joe Dederichs - Details HERE

QuarterMaster Optimum RR Clutch with 2 "Rally" Discs for easier take off - Details HERE

A shot today before Body was removed ... to get an idea of tire width & track width.
Wheels are 18x13 Forgeline GZ3R.  10" backspacing in front.  
This is a "Zero Scrub" car.  Turns like a mutha in the tight corners.

Good look at the wheels, Track-Star hubs & StopTech Trophy brakes Optimized by Ron Sutton

Front End mount photos

Door Hinges

With Body Removed to finish the door X-brace bars

Car is Super low to ground, as you can see.
In fairness, this fella is 6' 1" / Actual roof height is 47"


 

Ron_Sutton
Ron_Sutton New Reader
6/14/18 6:29 p.m.

Howdy everyone!

Our client Ron Ver Mulm installed one of our GT Decoupled 3-Links in his autocross car recently & used his GoPro to capture the first runs.  After watching the video, it was easy for me to know the rebound valving & spring rate are spot on, but his application needs stiffer compression valving & a taller, softer & more progressive bump stop.  He ran his fastest runs ever with our new GT Decoupled 3-Link, over his conventional 3-link.  After we change the compression valving & bump stop, he'll most likely shave another .3-.4 off his lap times.  

For those not in the know ... the decoupled 3-link is the highest grip, fastest rear suspension available period.  The shock version won so many Trans Am races back in the day, they outlawed it.  (You can run our TA version legally in Trans Am, which uses poly bushings & no shock.)  

We utilize this "shock controlled" decoupled 3-Link rear suspension in all of our GT Track-Warrior cars featured in this thread.  
* Greg Weld's 70 Mustang
* Mark Milliron's 69 Torino
* Scott Pomeroy's 68 Chevelle
* Robert Taylor's 47 REO Speedwagon Truck
* Many others

Got questions?  Want one for your autocross or track car? 
See both versions in our catalog  HERE
Contact Dave at 844-722-3832 Ext 3
Or email, Dave@RonSuttonRaceTechnology.com

 

 

Or go  HERE HERE for full screen version.

DeadSkunk
DeadSkunk PowerDork
6/15/18 11:18 a.m.

So, is one of the top links a shock absorber and the other some sort of coil spring strut (like a dirt track "pull bar"?), rather than a conventional single link?

Ron_Sutton
Ron_Sutton New Reader
6/15/18 1:25 p.m.
DeadSkunk said:

So, is one of the top links a shock absorber and the other some sort of coil spring strut (like a dirt track "pull bar"?), rather than a conventional single link?

You can see better photos of the two versions I utilize HERE

We initially ran these in Trans Am, back in the late 80's & early 90's, until the rules were changed that outlawed the shock absorber.  The upper & lower links are "decoupled" from each other.  Meaning they can act independently.  We call the lower link the "Accel Link" since it is only loaded under acceleration.  The angle of this link, along with its instant center location & subsequent anti-squat percentage ONLY affects the rear grip of the car on corner exit, under throttle.  We call the upper link the "Decel Link" since it is only loaded under deceleration.  The angle of this link, along with its instant center location & subsequent anti-squat percentage ONLY affects the rear grip of the car on corner entry, under braking.  

In every other suspension ... 4-link, torque arm, IRS, regular 3-link, etc ... where the instant center location & anti-squat percentage affects the rear grip of the car BOTH on corner entry & corner exit and therefore is always a compromise.  If we shorten the instant center location & increase anti-squat percentage, we increase rear grip on corner exit, but decrease rear grip on corner entry.  And conversely, if we lengthen the instant center location & decrease anti-squat percentage, we decrease rear grip on corner exit, but increase rear grip on corner entry. 

With a decoupled 3-Link rear suspension, we optimize the rear grip on corner entry & corner exit separately.  Both the accel link & decel link need some sort of "spring" to compress when loaded. It can be a conventional looking coil spring, or poly bushings/bump stops.  We select these spring rates depending upon power level, car weight, tire size & compound.  The better the tire grip level to power is, the harder the spring we run.  The worse the tire grip level to power is, the softer the spring we run. For example, a lot of our Optima Ultimate Street Car competitors running on TW200 tires, run 800# to 1200# springs.  Where our road race clients with 12"-13" slicks run 2000#-3500# spring rates. 

Our version that is legal today in Trans Am, does NOT use a shock absorber.  So it is more violent than the shock version.  It's still faster & allows us to optimize grip separately on corner entry & exit. But you can really feel the hit on corner entry & gear shifts.  The shock version tames all that down to make it less violent.  The autocross example in the video is good on accel, but too rough on decel.  So it needs stiffer compression in the shock and/or a longer, softer, more progressive bump stop or poly bushings. We're making those changes for that client & we'll post new videos once he runs it again. 

The spring on the accel link is simply softening the "hit" or "blow" to the tire at throttle roll on.  This allows the suspension to absorb this initial hit, instead of the tire.  In simple terms, we're being nicer to the tire.  Same softening effect on gear shifts.  The suspension is absorbing the hit, instead of the tire getting shocked & spinning. The spring on the decel side is simply softening the hit when we come off of acceleration. 

The shock we utilize is a mono-tube, ultra low gas pressure shock, with a remote canister (short tube) that has a 4.5 millisecond response rate.  That's faster than we can achieve with any normal car race shock.  But it is too small of a body to be used on the front of full bodied cars.  (We have run them successfully on open wheel cars, if the shock can get good airflow).  This shock is double adjustable with remote cable adjuster knobs.  On the straight away, the driver can click a knob one direction or the other to increase grip or decrease grip ... on corner entry & exit separately.  The valving is reversed from most race shocks.  Compression is much higher than the rebound. 

FYI, for reference, the best race shocks all respond within 5.0-6.0 milliseconds. 
JRI's with a canister have a 5.0 millisecond response rate. 
JRI's without a canister, Penske's with a canister & Fox/Ridetech's with a canister & the double digressive piston have a 5.5 millisecond response rate. 
Penske's without a canister & Fox/Ridetech's without a canister & with the double digressive piston have a 6.0 millisecond response rate.
* The faster the shock responds, the better the tire follows the undulations of the asphalt surface at speed & the more grip we have. 

Hope that sheds some light.

Ron_Sutton
Ron_Sutton New Reader
6/19/18 11:16 a.m.

 

The Ron Sutton Total Car Building Workshop in Columbus is ONLY 2 WEEKS away.

Tickets available HERE

This workshop covers the Entire Car Build ... not just suspension. I'm going to show you how to build winning cars that work awesome from bumper to bumper ... car body, brakes, engine, trans, diff, aero & much more will be covered. More details in attached brochure pages.

For more information about the Workshops, contact Susan Kinnicutt
Susan@RonSuttonRaceTechnology.com

 

 

 

Saron81
Saron81 New Reader
6/19/18 1:16 p.m.

Incredible builds! Thanks for taking the time to share them with us, and explain how they work!

Did Roush use the decoupled 3 link in their XR4Ti bodied TA cars? I’m trying to remember where I’ve seen a similar setup.

badwaytolive
badwaytolive Reader
6/19/18 3:06 p.m.

Thanks for sharing, Ron!

What amazing stuff- it's really cool to see under the skin of these top-tier racers.

damen

Ron_Sutton
Ron_Sutton New Reader
7/2/18 5:26 p.m.

In reply to Saron81 :

Yes, Roush used the shock controlled decoupled 3-Link until Trans Am outlawed it.

Ron_Sutton
Ron_Sutton New Reader
7/2/18 5:26 p.m.

In reply to badwaytolive :

Cool.  Glad you're enjoying it. 

DeadSkunk
DeadSkunk PowerDork
7/6/18 2:05 p.m.

Ron, how tall is that Track_Warrior 3 engine from bottom of the pan to the top of the intake?  I've been measuring my Corolla and engine height is going to be an issue, and I don't get to use a dry sump to reduce the height.

Ron_Sutton
Ron_Sutton New Reader
7/6/18 2:44 p.m.
DeadSkunk said:

Ron, how tall is that Track_Warrior 3 engine from bottom of the pan to the top of the intake?  I've been measuring my Corolla and engine height is going to be an issue, and I don't get to use a dry sump to reduce the height.

24.5"

 

DeadSkunk
DeadSkunk PowerDork
7/8/18 6:39 a.m.

In reply to Ron_Sutton :

Thanks. An engine that height would work nicely, but I won't be able to find a Challenge cost friendly engine that slim. Maybe time to reconsider my engine wishes/choices. Yesterday I was running around at the Columbus Goodguys meet measuring  all the engines in the supplier displays. All the reps winced when I said I was looking for a 25-26" tall motor. Oh well, it's not called "The Challenge" because it's easy. frown

Ron_Sutton
Ron_Sutton New Reader
7/9/18 12:45 p.m.

Some of you may not have realized on our shake down day the car wasn't ready to race or run many laps because the interior tin wasn't sealed & the exhaust wasn't thermal barrier coated.  

The cockpit needs to be fully sealed from the engine bay & fuel cell area.  We use a 3M Fire Retardant Sealer good up to 2000°. The exhaust runs so close to the transmission, the gear oil would overheat in it if the exhaust was uncoated.  So we Jet-Hot coat the inside & outside of the header tubes & exhaust.  (Mufflers only on the outside)  This knocks down the radiant heat around the transmission & driver by 40-45°.   

The Mustang comes apart late this week to go to powder coat. In our Track-Warrior cars like Greg's ... the steel floor, firewall & bulkhead/rear deck sheet metal are welded to the chassis ... and get powder coated along with the chassis & cage assembly.  When it goes back together for final assembly, Randy Chastain will utilize the 3M Fire Retardant Sealer on every seam under the car, at the firewall & at the rear bulkhead & decklid sheet metal.  This prevents C0², smoke, oil, fire, etc from entering into the cockpit.   

I'm outlining this important step, because many of you already have, or will, modify the sheet metal in your builds & NEED TO KNOW it's critical to seal it & what to use.  It's NOT OK to leave any seam unsealed.  It's unsafe.  

The car will go back together later this month & get ready to go run the NASA event at Thunderhill Raceway in Willows California on Aug 4-5.  Since the car wasn't built to fit a class, we will run it in the "Unlimited" class of NASA's Time Attack, known as TTU.  Since it is an unlimited class, often there are Prototype race cars that run in TTU.  

We won't stand a chance against any Prototype race cars, with our Trans Am style 70 Mustang.  But if there are no Prototype race cars, we'll have a good shot at running up front. Our driver Benny Moon is super talented, but hasn't been in a real race car is many years, so he'll need to shake off the rust as we work up to speed.

I don't know how fast we'll get this first weekend.  I plan to do only basic tuning for balance.  But it would be fun to have a pool of folks betting on Benny's best lap of the weekend.  

We have a betting pool ... similar to a football pool.
* 100 times between 1:50.0 & 1:59.9 lap time, a tenth of a second apart
* Pick one time or as many as your wallet can handle
* Closest time wins all the pool money & bragging rights
* Only 1 time, Best time of the weekend, counts

Pick your time(s) HERE

DeadSkunk
DeadSkunk PowerDork
9/13/18 5:15 p.m.

Any more updates, Ron? 

1 2 3
Our Preferred Partners
4tggyg8vb5XhQe9RgZnfEhjRo9dNQ1xOUI6pZZV8XMZH36UknxgkRGHFxj8L7UGY