MrBenjamonkey
MrBenjamonkey Reader
8/13/10 10:16 a.m.

Let's start off here with some background. I recently made friends with some missionaries (Korean missionaries love me, which is weird, but anyway) who know a guy who owns a repair shop. Nothing special, but he does get a good deal on junkyard parts. With the help of my students, I turned that connection into a cheap spare hood and trunk (we haven't cut up the trunk ... yet). Badabing badabang.

So the next thing was to sit down and teach a little about aerodynamics. Areas of high and low pressure, the function of gurney flaps, down force/lift etc. That was interesting, considering I was trying to do it while speaking Korean. When we finished talking and looking at aftermarket hoods on the internet, I turned the kids loose with masking tape, measuring tools and a mandate to design a lift reducing, airflow and cooling enhancing hood that would also feed the custom cold air kit we're building right now. I've never owned a track/autocross car that didn't have cooling problems, so I emphasized requirement number three most. They needed about three hours to get both vents straight and symmetrical, but I think they did a good job.

During the design phase I noticed several recycling centers in the neighborhood, snooped a little bit and found huge piles of scrap metal. About fifteen minutes of begging and petting junkyard cats later, the owners donated 10 pounds of steel in various random shapes. Some stainless steel designed for roofing became our gurney flaps and the skin to a small filing cabinet gave birth to the scoop. I did the cutting and grinding out of concerns for safety, but all the design, drilling, installation, riveting, shaping, hammering etc came from the students.

About the scoop. One of the students spent several hours (somewhat effectively) hammering the tabs flat and true. Probably because he'd designed it in the first place, this kid decided the scoop should be riveted on in five separate locations. I'm relatively certain this part approaches the engine block's levels of rigidity.

Other stuff. The grey lining you see on the vents is a safety feature designed to keep kids from cutting their fingers on sharp metal edges. I couldn't find any purpose made liners, so we built our own by stripping the insulation off of large gauge electrical wire, wrapping it over the edges and then supergluing it on. Not sure how it's going to work, but worth a try. The stock grill was ugly so we ditched it, but the mounting tabs for the stock grill were even uglier. The kids decided they should join the grill in car parts heaven. We also cut all the sound deadening baffles out of the stock airbox. We'll be painting the whole thing flat black Monday, but I wanted to get the pictures now so you all could see the fabrication process.

Next week we'll make that custom cold air kit (fed from both above and below) and take out a big chunk of exhaust. After that, we'll be doing a brake job (might modify the rotors to a slotted design) and hopefully dropping in some coilovers.

Please let me know if you guys have any budget friendly, not-that-skilled-of-a-mechanic friendly ideas. Thanks.

mndsm
mndsm Dork
8/13/10 11:27 a.m.

I like this build.

DukeOfUndersteer
DukeOfUndersteer SuperDork
8/13/10 11:35 a.m.
mndsm wrote: I like this build.

+1. Diggin it!

MrBenjamonkey
MrBenjamonkey Reader
8/13/10 12:23 p.m.

In reply to Wonkothesane: Doing it. That's friggin genius. It's great when people who are smarter than me are so helpful.

conesare2seconds
conesare2seconds New Reader
8/13/10 12:30 p.m.

Again: this community is the best; it's always where nerdy is congruent with cool.

SVreX
SVreX SuperDork
8/13/10 12:45 p.m.
mndsm wrote: I like this build.

...AND this builder!

Love the attitude, monkey man!

Keep it up!!

Marty!
Marty! Dork
8/13/10 1:38 p.m.
SVreX wrote:
mndsm wrote: I like this build.
...AND this builder! Love the attitude, monkey man! Keep it up!!

+1.

The stickers are also on their way.

Marty!
Marty! Dork
8/13/10 1:43 p.m.
MrBenjamonkey wrote: Please let me know if you guys have any budget friendly, not-that-skilled-of-a-mechanic friendly ideas. Thanks.

Plywood front air splitter?

http://www.wrxtuners.com/forums/f93/front-splitter-diy-16508/

Might be a little ricey but that seems to be the look most kids like.

triumph5
triumph5 Reader
8/13/10 2:19 p.m.

Your students are very lucky to have you as their mentor/teacher.

racer_ace
racer_ace Reader
8/13/10 8:18 p.m.
triumph5 wrote: Your students are very lucky to have you as their mentor/teacher.

I second that statement. Excellent job!

Raze
Raze Dork
8/13/10 10:28 p.m.

if you wanted to go for extra credit you could teach them about laminar vs turbulent flow by adding small lengths of string/yarn at proportional locations all over the body of the car and then taking images of the vehicle at speed, OR even better get an industrial fan, measure the air flow speed, put in front of car (or area of concern and measure) while standing still. The kids will learn all about aerodynamics beyond pressure regions, they'll learn what 'creates' those areas of high and low pressure!

You can then play around with different techniques, as far as shapes, opening, ducting, etc which will improve laminar flow on and around the body...

Appleseed
Appleseed SuperDork
8/14/10 12:25 a.m.

Kids did that? Berkely-Yeah!

You've done more to a Daewoo, in a short time, with kids, than most people will do their entire lives.

MrBenjamonkey
MrBenjamonkey Reader
8/14/10 10:29 p.m.
Marty! wrote:
SVreX wrote:
mndsm wrote: I like this build.
...AND this builder! Love the attitude, monkey man! Keep it up!!
+1. The stickers are also on their way.

Thanks guys. I'm having a ton of fun with this school project, to the point where I almost - almost - feel guilty collecting my salary.

MrBenjamonkey
MrBenjamonkey Reader
8/14/10 10:34 p.m.
Marty! wrote:
MrBenjamonkey wrote: Please let me know if you guys have any budget friendly, not-that-skilled-of-a-mechanic friendly ideas. Thanks.
Plywood front air splitter? http://www.wrxtuners.com/forums/f93/front-splitter-diy-16508/ Might be a little ricey but that seems to be the look most kids like.

I will probably end up doing this too. Firstly, one of the students requested it. Secondly, I recently discovered the joys of riveting. Thirdly, a splitter will supposedly give me slightly better coefficient of drag and some down force. I almost certainly won't have time this summer vacation, but I eventually want to flat bottom the whole car from the firewall forward. Forth, metal fab is fun, and if you get covered in steel dust and walk into the rain you and your students can "rust" in a matter of minutes

I'll probably do mine from aluminum though.

MrBenjamonkey
MrBenjamonkey Reader
8/14/10 10:35 p.m.
Raze wrote: if you wanted to go for extra credit you could teach them about laminar vs turbulent flow by adding small lengths of string/yarn at proportional locations all over the body of the car and then taking images of the vehicle at speed, OR even better get an industrial fan, measure the air flow speed, put in front of car (or area of concern and measure) while standing still. The kids will learn all about aerodynamics beyond pressure regions, they'll learn what 'creates' those areas of high and low pressure! You can then play around with different techniques, as far as shapes, opening, ducting, etc which will improve laminar flow on and around the body...

I like this too. Now to find an industrial fan ....

MrBenjamonkey
MrBenjamonkey Reader
8/14/10 10:45 p.m.
Appleseed wrote: Kids did that? Berkely-Yeah! You've done more to a Daewoo, in a short time, with kids, than most people will do their entire lives.

Yah, it's actually kind of funny how this build is going. Except for the things they aren't physically strong enough to do, or the things that are too dangerous, I've done none of the installation, design or disassembly.

The process normally goes like this: 1. "Teacher, how do I take this off?" 2. I take the part off by myself, showing the kids each step. 3. I put everything back together and tighten it up. 4. Students take it off for good.

Other than that, I do a lot of making sure they're being safe, offering suggestions and letting them fail. Everything takes three times as long as if I was doing it solo, but this is definitely more fun.

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