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DeadSkunk  (Warren)
DeadSkunk (Warren) UltimaDork
4/4/21 8:32 a.m.

No need for a lathe.........cheap Chinese drill press.........

kevinatfms
kevinatfms GRM+ Memberand Reader
4/6/21 6:15 a.m.

Would anyone want to make a set of bushings for a GRM friend?

DeadSkunk (Warren) said:

No need for a lathe.........cheap Chinese drill press.........

Yes!!! I saw this in a fever dream once, and I was pretty sure I had to try it.   Your version looks at least 40% less likely to draw blood than the one in my head though, so I’m probably going to steal this idea.  Thanks!

 

stafford1500
stafford1500 GRM+ Memberand Dork
4/6/21 7:06 a.m.

In reply to kevinatfms :

Send me some dimensions and quantities, and i will send back quote. Pictures or drawings would be extra good

dean1484
dean1484 GRM+ Memberand MegaDork
4/6/21 7:22 a.m.

I jammed together a home built lath and what I discovered is that many drills are built to a quality that you can not use them. They have way to much run out in the bushings/bearings. I finally ended up with a Comercial grade Milwaukee 1/2 inch drill that was good enough.  I also needed a drill at the time.  

kevinatfms
kevinatfms GRM+ Memberand Reader
4/6/21 7:36 a.m.
stafford1500 said:

In reply to kevinatfms :

Send me some dimensions and quantities, and i will send back quote. Pictures or drawings would be extra good

Replied to your email. Thank you for reaching out. Quite excited.

DeadSkunk  (Warren)
DeadSkunk (Warren) UltimaDork
4/6/21 8:02 a.m.

In reply to dean1484 :

Oh, mine has lots of run out, but I just went very slowly and it's for a Challenge car, so "good enough".

CAinCA
CAinCA GRM+ Memberand Reader
4/6/21 12:47 p.m.
Driven5 said:
OnTheChip said:

Does the control arm motion occur between the bolt and sleeve, the sleeve and bushing, or busing and arm?

Typically the sleeve rotates in the bushing and the bolt is just there to clamp it all together, but that's just the beginning.  In order for everything to locate, support, and move properly, you'll also need to figure out the fit between the bushing OD and the control arm housing ID, the amount of resulting shrinkage of the installed bushing ID, the fit between the sleeve and installed bushing ID, the fit between the bushing flanges and the mounting bracket, and the fit between the sleeve and the mounting bracket to ensure the fit between the bushing flanges and the mounting bracket when the bolt locks the bracket down tight against the sleeve. And that's all assuming that the suspension you're working with has already been confirmed as operating only pure single axis rotational motion for each bushing being replaced.

For all of the 'technical' articles/blogs/posts I have seen out there proclaiming how 'easy' it is to make (or have made) DIY bushings, I don't think I've ever seen one that includes any of the 'minor details' that are actually critical to doing so correctly. It always seems to be some variation on...

Phase 1: Collect Delrin

Phase 2: ?

Phase 3: Bushings

THIS ^

You really need to nail the fits in order for the bushings to work correctly. The OD needs to be a light press fit. The ID needs to be a slip fit. A few thousandths too big or small and they won't fit or they will rattle and wear early. 

I have a stick of Delrin I bought to make rear swing arm bushings for my brother's 356 kit car. I haven't made them because I really want the arms and sleeves in my hands before I start turning. Second hand measurements and TLAR engineering won't cut it IMHO.

WillG80
WillG80 GRM+ Memberand Reader
4/6/21 2:39 p.m.

Does anybody know if the $500 wood lathes are beefy enough to turn plastic and aluminum? 

84FSP
84FSP UltraDork
4/7/21 8:38 a.m.
Randy_Forbes said:

Fun projects!  I made a couple of forays into bushing making__machined and molded__some years back with good results.

Before Jeff Ireland/Ireland Engineering started marketing his urethane subframe mounting bushings for the E-30 esque Z3 and M Rdstr applications, I was molding some "bushing stuffers" from a pourable Devcon 2-part urethane (Shore hardness unknown, as I've slept since then...).  These filled the longitudinal voids in the OE bushings and also packed the space at the tops and bottoms to eliminate a substantial amount of the excessive compliance.  By all accounts, they were a success.  The professionally manufactured and store-bought polyurethane bushes from IE were a substantial improvement on what I was making, so I abandoned them and have probably purchased and installed Jeff's bushes in 150-175 cars since then.  I wish I could remember what album has the pictures of my molds (made in 2-pieces from a pourable aluminum/resin product from Loctite).  I'll edit this post if I come across them, but I too used a plastic food-container dish to make the molds!

The machined bushes were turned in both UHMW (Ultra High Molecular Weight bushing material) and a bronze alloy.  I never finished the bronze ones to size, opting to install the UHMW ones for a test first.  They are still in the upper/outer pivot position, allowing a decrease from +1* (positive) camber to approximately -2* negative camber on my '57 Healey.  I made them eccentric, so that they were adjustable to enable matching both sides.  Given that the UHMW bushes have been in for nearly 15 years already (recently inspected during a front shock upgrade) and found that there's still no perceptible wear at the ends or bolt-holes and that the bronze bushes only need (both of) the ends trimmed to size, I doubt I'll need to make any more for this application in my lifetime!

 UHMW bushes before ends were trimmed to size

Fitted to the Healey's upper trunion (previously machined for straight bore; original 1/2-bushes were tapered)

So yes, Doable AND Fun project that anyone can do at home**
 

 

 

** NO Dads were used or otherwise harmed during the above exercises. 

UHMWPE has fantastic wear properties despite not having the highest temperature range.  They should last a life time if properly avoiding shock hits at higher temps.  Delrin/POM is also good but can't hold a candle to the wear and density of the EHMWPE despite holding better high temps.

asphalt_gundam
asphalt_gundam Reader
4/7/21 2:55 p.m.

I'll be giving Recycled PTFE a try for motor and trans mounts soon. Picked it because of the up to 500 degree temp range due to header proximity and the Durometer being a little stiffer than rubber.  I'm hoping they'll keep reasonable movement for the engine and transmission but last all year without tearing like the stock mounts. More room by ditching the bulky stock mount will be a plus too. 

Tom Suddard
Tom Suddard GRM+ Memberand Director of Marketing & Digital Assets
4/7/21 3:06 p.m.

In reply to WillG80 :

You're far better off picking up a used metal lathe. Even if you find one that's been abused and has a bunch of runout, it will still work fine for making plastic bushings.

Pete. (l33t FS)
Pete. (l33t FS) MegaDork
4/7/21 5:06 p.m.
jerrysarcastic (Forum Supporter) said:
DeadSkunk (Warren) said:

No need for a lathe.........cheap Chinese drill press.........

Yes!!! I saw this in a fever dream once, and I was pretty sure I had to try it.   Your version looks at least 40% less likely to draw blood than the one in my head though, so I’m probably going to steal this idea.  Thanks!

 

I've used this method, with a really coarse file and a 99 cent hockey puck, to make a one piece shift linkage "golf ball" for my A2-chassis VW.

Lasted forever, the VW part would last about six months.

 

(The A2 chassis shift linkage was an ingenious way to transfer motion from the shifter to the top/front of the transmission, without being affected by drivetrain motion.  But soooo much opportunity for play to develop.)

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