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J.A. Ackley
J.A. Ackley Senior Editor
1/23/23 12:52 p.m.
feature_image

In 2021, GM said it planned to exclusively offer electric vehicles by 2035. However, on Friday, the company announced that it’s going to invest in preparing four manufacturing facilities to build the next-gen GM V8to the tune of $854 million.

They also went on to say, “Product details, timing, performance and features related to GM’s next gen V-8 …

Read the rest of the story

Toyman!
Toyman! GRM+ Memberand MegaDork
1/23/23 1:09 p.m.

They will still be sticking big engines in big trucks after the car fleet goes entirely electric. Battery tech has a ways to go before it can haul big weights, big distances without special infrastructure. The v8 may well outlive the v6 and the 4-cylinder. 

Datsun310Guy
Datsun310Guy MegaDork
1/23/23 1:25 p.m.

I guess we're getting closer every year......

"Last of the V8's"

 

Keith Tanner
Keith Tanner GRM+ Memberand MegaDork
1/23/23 1:51 p.m.
Toyman! said:

They will still be sticking big engines in big trucks after the car fleet goes entirely electric. Battery tech has a ways to go before it can haul big weights, big distances without special infrastructure. The v8 may well outlive the v6 and the 4-cylinder. 

And the last high volume application will likely be in something like a truck.

Toyman!
Toyman! GRM+ Memberand MegaDork
1/23/23 2:42 p.m.

In reply to Keith Tanner :

That's my guess. 

 

 

GameboyRMH
GameboyRMH GRM+ Memberand MegaDork
1/23/23 2:54 p.m.
Toyman! said:

They will still be sticking big engines in big trucks after the car fleet goes entirely electric. Battery tech has a ways to go before it can haul big weights, big distances without special infrastructure. The v8 may well outlive the v6 and the 4-cylinder. 

Semis will be using combustion engines for a while longer but not necessarily a V8, a hybrid setup with a turbine engine could make a lot of sense for a semi too...

alfadriver
alfadriver GRM+ Memberand MegaDork
1/23/23 3:13 p.m.
GameboyRMH said:
Toyman! said:

They will still be sticking big engines in big trucks after the car fleet goes entirely electric. Battery tech has a ways to go before it can haul big weights, big distances without special infrastructure. The v8 may well outlive the v6 and the 4-cylinder. 

Semis will be using combustion engines for a while longer but not necessarily a V8, a hybrid setup with a turbine engine could make a lot of sense for a semi too...

MD and HD vehicles will also use ICE's for quite a while.   And quite a bit of gas since the rules are very tightening up for both segments (which are different than semis).

fidelity101
fidelity101 UberDork
1/23/23 3:14 p.m.

the irony is that the photo is not of a v8

J.A. Ackley
J.A. Ackley Senior Editor
1/23/23 3:29 p.m.
fidelity101 said:

the irony is that the photo is not of a v8

Good eye. We replaced it with a different photo that fits better. Thanks!

MotorsportsGordon
MotorsportsGordon Dork
1/23/23 3:36 p.m.

There's also the potential for possibly hydrogen fueled v8s in the future. I know Toyota and Yamaha have a hydrogen v8.

MotorsportsGordon
MotorsportsGordon Dork
1/23/23 3:41 p.m.
Keith Tanner
Keith Tanner GRM+ Memberand MegaDork
1/23/23 4:37 p.m.
GameboyRMH said:
Toyman! said:

They will still be sticking big engines in big trucks after the car fleet goes entirely electric. Battery tech has a ways to go before it can haul big weights, big distances without special infrastructure. The v8 may well outlive the v6 and the 4-cylinder. 

Semis will be using combustion engines for a while longer but not necessarily a V8, a hybrid setup with a turbine engine could make a lot of sense for a semi too...

Oh man, turbine powered series electric trucks would be awesome.

Mazda built a hydrogen powered rotary Miata 30 years ago. Hydrogen has some serious problems when it comes to actual real-world use. It might be a good option for the big OTR trucks that go between specific points, but then again we already have trains.

QuasiMofo (John Brown)
QuasiMofo (John Brown) GRM+ Memberand MegaDork
1/23/23 5:07 p.m.

In reply to Keith Tanner :

Trains? What are we, Europe? Pshhh! This is 'Merica and in 'Merica we take large vehicles with us on vacation so we can enjoy the scenic beauty of states like Iowa and Ohio!

VolvoHeretic
VolvoHeretic GRM+ Memberand HalfDork
1/23/23 6:45 p.m.

I predict that the battery electric changeover is going to be pushed out another decade at least if not two. There is no way that battery infrastructure will be ready in only 12 years.

AnthonyGS (Forum Supporter)
AnthonyGS (Forum Supporter) GRM+ Memberand UberDork
1/23/23 9:30 p.m.
GameboyRMH said:
Toyman! said:

They will still be sticking big engines in big trucks after the car fleet goes entirely electric. Battery tech has a ways to go before it can haul big weights, big distances without special infrastructure. The v8 may well outlive the v6 and the 4-cylinder. 

Semis will be using combustion engines for a while longer but not necessarily a V8, a hybrid setup with a turbine engine could make a lot of sense for a semi too...

Semis have been big inline 6s with big hair dryers for a long time. 

AnthonyGS (Forum Supporter)
AnthonyGS (Forum Supporter) GRM+ Memberand UberDork
1/23/23 9:31 p.m.
Keith Tanner said:
GameboyRMH said:
Toyman! said:

They will still be sticking big engines in big trucks after the car fleet goes entirely electric. Battery tech has a ways to go before it can haul big weights, big distances without special infrastructure. The v8 may well outlive the v6 and the 4-cylinder. 

Semis will be using combustion engines for a while longer but not necessarily a V8, a hybrid setup with a turbine engine could make a lot of sense for a semi too...

Oh man, turbine powered series electric trucks would be awesome.

Mazda built a hydrogen powered rotary Miata 30 years ago. Hydrogen has some serious problems when it comes to actual real-world use. It might be a good option for the big OTR trucks that go between specific points, but then again we already have trains.

The biggest problem is large quantities H2 plus atmospheric levels of oxygen is explosive. 

AnthonyGS (Forum Supporter)
AnthonyGS (Forum Supporter) GRM+ Memberand UberDork
1/23/23 9:32 p.m.
VolvoHeretic said:

I predict that the battery electric changeover is going to be pushed out another decade at least if not two. There is no way that battery infrastructure will be ready in only 12 years.

I predict a lot of the energy edicts made by people that know little to nothing about energy will not come to fruition in the times demanded.  But what do I know? 

frenchyd
frenchyd GRM+ Memberand MegaDork
1/23/23 10:37 p.m.
Toyman! said:

They will still be sticking big engines in big trucks after the car fleet goes entirely electric. Battery tech has a ways to go before it can haul big weights, big distances without special infrastructure. The v8 may well outlive the v6 and the 4-cylinder. 

Well railroad trains have been pulling miles of railroad cars with relatively small electric motors powered by diesel engines.   IE Hybrids. Some trains are even all electric. 
      So what's to prevent an electric truck lane?   Picking up voltage overhead?   
      Or for hybrid's why not small turbines?   Throttle of the turbine  to be controlled by feedback from the battery system?  Turbines are simple and efficient. But like relatively stable RPM. 
   Instead of oil based fuel  the Navy is using Biofuel. 

Datsun310Guy
Datsun310Guy MegaDork
1/23/23 11:23 p.m.

In reply to frenchyd :

Those diesel locomotives need a big engine to run a huge generator so can we really run trucks? Will this package all fit?

I used to visit Electromotive Locomotives for sales and the volume of copper wire waiting to become coils was impressive.  The 710 engine model meant 710 cubic inches per cylinder times V8, V12, V16  or a V20. 

And in keeping the theme EMD was once owned by General Motors. 

frenchyd
frenchyd GRM+ Memberand MegaDork
1/23/23 11:49 p.m.

In reply to Datsun310Guy :

We aren't talking about hauling hundreds of thousands of tons.. Rather 80,000 pounds max. So things don't need to be railroad size.  Just use the principle. 

VolvoHeretic
VolvoHeretic GRM+ Memberand HalfDork
1/24/23 12:21 a.m.
MotorsportsGordon
MotorsportsGordon Dork
1/24/23 12:34 a.m.
stuart in mn
stuart in mn MegaDork
1/24/23 6:55 a.m.
GameboyRMH said:

Semis will be using combustion engines for a while longer but not necessarily a V8, a hybrid setup with a turbine engine could make a lot of sense for a semi too...

Did you say turbine powered truck?  Behold the Chevy Turbo Titan from 1966.  smiley https://www.topspeed.com/cars/guides/the-story-of-turbo-titan-chevy-s-long-lost-gas-turbine-truck/

There was also the GM Bison concept truck from 1964.  https://tfltruck.com/2018/01/truck-rewind-1964-general-motors-bison-concept-the-future-looked-awesome/

Ford had a concept turbine truck as well, in 1964.

pinchvalve (Forum Supporter)
pinchvalve (Forum Supporter) GRM+ Memberand MegaDork
1/24/23 8:24 a.m.

This has nothing to do with V8s, but since we were talking about odd truck concepts...

DaleCarter
DaleCarter GRM+ Memberand New Reader
1/24/23 10:00 a.m.

LONG LIVE THE CHEVY V8!!!!! GM seems to understand that government mandates, like the one in CA, will be pushed back well past 2035 due to the near impossibility of actually implementing them.

One problem with hydrogen fuel for vehicles is the massive amount of electricity or carbon-based fuels, almost always natural gas,  needed to create the fuel. Desalinization has the same problem with the electricity demands. My solution is to build dedicated nuke and natural gas generation plants for the two purposes, which would solve the water, fuel and emissions problems in California.

I'm sure CA will be happy to build a dozen small-scale nuke and natural gas plants for this "green" fuel industry :-)

I think the most interesting area for EV trucking is in local delivery. Think UPS, FedEx, USPS and local food service deliveries, among others. Usually, those fleets run out-and-back routes, returning to a central depot where they sit overnight. They comprise about 85% of all trucking miles driven in the US.

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