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Apexcarver
Apexcarver UltimaDork
7/7/20 8:42 p.m.

I'm still running older 18v DeWalt, I found some non-branded grey replacement batteries on Amazon for fairly cheap several years ago and been keeping them alive.

GIRTHQUAKE
GIRTHQUAKE Dork
7/8/20 11:23 a.m.

Apparently Makita is gunning after Ryobi for "A battery powered tool for every job"- Battery powered coffee maker, anyone?

Since Makita is one of the few tool companies that isn't apart of a faceless conglomerate (and also isn't EVA Unit 01 Neon Green), I'd be interested to know people's opinions on em'.

Ranger50
Ranger50 UltimaDork
7/8/20 11:37 a.m.

I started with some killer deals from cpoutlets on a 1/4" and 3/8" m12 ratchets and a 3/8" m18 impact. I just added the 4 1/2"/5" m18 angle grinder. I'm not switching. Next up is the fuel 1/2" drill and 1/4" hex driver currently on sale at HD.

rob_lewis
rob_lewis UltraDork
7/8/20 12:08 p.m.

I use Ryobi stuff for price and since I'm not a professional.  So far, no issues with them.  I had a full Craftsman set that's close to 20 years old now, but rarely use them anymore since I have the Ryobi. 

Question I have is, what about battery compatibility down the road.  Some of the brands seem to change battery connections regularly so you can't buy a new tool and expect your 3-5 year old battery to still work. I understand that voltage and battery type changes over the years.  I've heard (maybe I read it here) that Ryobi is committed to keeping the same battery connections for a long as possible.  That seems like a mark in their win column for me.

I kinda want a smaller cordless impact for just normal disassembly/assembly work, but the only ones I've found are Makita's and Milwaukee's and I just can't justify $200 for a tool that I can't share batteries with.  Well, and justifying $200 to save hand wrenching.

-Rob

procainestart
procainestart Dork
7/8/20 3:14 p.m.
mr2s2000elise said:

In reply to procainestart :

Do you recommend taking the battery out of tool after usage ? 

Yeah, that's what I've been doing.

Maniac0301
Maniac0301 HalfDork
7/8/20 6:22 p.m.

I've got a 18v Ryobi setup that has been fine.   I've been using em for about 5 years so far no tool has broke but about 1/2 the 5 or so batteries I got over the years have stopped working.  Tools I use most are the 1/2" impact, sawzall, screw gun, drill, and brad nailer.   All have done nearly everything I've asked of em and I do not treat them nicely.   Despite the low power rating the impact has managed to shear several bolts when I inadvertently had it on righty tighty and its even stronger on removal.    The cordless brad nailer and screw gun have been perfect for home improvement jobs.   

With many cheaper tools I recommend using good quality consumables.   Good drill bits and blades make cheaper drills and sawzalls punch above their weight.   These certainly won't handle day to day tradesmen work but for the home gamer they do fine.   Black Friday has some pretty insane deals especially if you catch a returned box right after.   I picked up 2 batteries, a drill, screwgun, brad nailer, and sawzall in a boxed package for $200 this way.

mr2s2000elise
mr2s2000elise SuperDork
7/8/20 6:46 p.m.
procainestart said:
mr2s2000elise said:

In reply to procainestart :

Do you recommend taking the battery out of tool after usage ? 

Yeah, that's what I've been doing.

Great I will do it on the new dewalt. Used the 20v last night, to get my headlight restoration done. SO much better than my 12V before

JesseWolfe
JesseWolfe Reader
7/8/20 6:47 p.m.

Everything at work changed over to Milwaukee 12v and 18v, 1/4 drive stuff all the way up to 3/4" impact.  It works extremely well for stuff that is used 24/7 by some rough train mechanics, and I don't think we've trashed but a couple batteries. 

 

I use Mikita 18v at home, the 3/8 ratchet isn't as nice as the Milwaukee one, but Mikita has affordable options on brad nailers a staplers that work wonders on house projects. 

nderwater
nderwater UltimaDork
7/8/20 8:14 p.m.

So the big box stores are now filled with cordless yard tools. I need a lawn mower.  Does anyone have experience with these new battery electric mowers yet?

californiamilleghia
californiamilleghia Dork
7/8/20 8:20 p.m.

How do the 1/4 inch impact drivers work for taking things apart with a 3/8 inch socket adapter ?

I think they are mostly used for putting drywall screws in   

thanks for the info

 

Maniac0301
Maniac0301 HalfDork
7/8/20 9:15 p.m.

In reply to nderwater :

We have an E-Go push mower and a fairly large 1/2 acre yard.  Battery charge is 1/2 the yard at a time but charging is quick.  I would suggest forgoing the powered wheels the extra draw isn't worth it and the mower is light enough to not need it.   We got it because my wife wanted to start mowing the yard instead of paying someone and I didn't want to deal with small engine starting.  For the cost we could have gotten a very nice Honda gas mower though which would be more powerful and probably start on one pull every time.   Still I'm happy enough not to have to deal with fuel and maintenance.   Extra bonus you can fold it and sit it vertical or even hang it without worrying about fuel or oil leaking out.   Extra extra bonus the thing doesn't vibrate your hands to numbness while being used like most gas mowers do.

Patientzero
Patientzero GRM+ Memberand HalfDork
7/8/20 9:24 p.m.

In reply to californiamilleghia :

They work great.  I used to use my 18v Dewalt to put lug nuts on before final torque with a torque wrench.  It would get it to about 60lb.ft.  It would loosen anything you'd normally use a 3/8 drive socket on.  This was the old NiCad stuff.   The new brushless stuff is even better.

californiamilleghia
californiamilleghia Dork
7/8/20 10:31 p.m.
Patientzero said:

In reply to californiamilleghia :

They work great.  I used to use my 18v Dewalt to put lug nuts on before final torque with a torque wrench.  It would get it to about 60lb.ft.  It would loosen anything you'd normally use a 3/8 drive socket on.  This was the old NiCad stuff.   The new brushless stuff is even better.

thanks , I have just been using it for phillip head screws , I guess I will look for a socket set-up

mr2s2000elise
mr2s2000elise SuperDork
8/26/20 1:28 p.m.

I love the dewalt 20v I got due to this thread 

 

but I don't own any extension that can go into that that can handle 19-24 mm

 

i have  to go to the store to see what extension fits instead of buying new tools again

car39
car39 Dork
8/26/20 2:10 p.m.

I'm a 18 volt Ryobi fan.  Every so often Home Depot has a brain dead sale, like 1 gallon air compressor with battery and air hammer for $89 vs the tool by itself for $129.  I was interested in a multi tool.  HD had a sale, buy 2 4 amp batteries with charger and a tool bag for $100 and get a tool for free.  The tool by itself was $79.  Easy to use, reliable, and inexpensive.  I also have a tool outlet nearby that sells Ryobi, Milwaukee, and Rigid reman stuff at some good prices, too.  It's nice to have some back up batteries for the jobs that take longer, or more power than you planned.

AngryCorvair (Forum Supporter)
AngryCorvair (Forum Supporter) GRM+ Memberand MegaDork
8/26/20 2:29 p.m.

I have all options within 15 minutes of home and I cheaped out on Bauer. The variable speed drill is more like a 4 speed drill where trigger travel is just slow slow slow med med med fast fast fast bit on fire. berkeley these tools. I'll go ryobi or better when these E36 M3 the bed in a year.

TheTallOne17
TheTallOne17 New Reader
8/26/20 3:02 p.m.

In reply to californiamilleghia :

I've used mine with the 1/2" adapter to remove peened over wheel nuts. It took off 3 and the Milwaukee brand adapter sheared on the 4th. I switched to my stubby air impact after that. I should get the real 3/8" or 1/2" stubby impact

Patientzero
Patientzero GRM+ Memberand HalfDork
8/26/20 3:14 p.m.

This is relevant here.  Sorry I can't post the video from work.

https://grassrootsmotorsports.com/forum/tech-tips/milwaukee-impact-comparision/174695/page1/

Mr_Asa
Mr_Asa SuperDork
11/23/20 1:32 p.m.
Mr_Asa said:

I chose Ryobi, FWIW.  Very much enjoying the circular saw.

 

Just an update

Couple weeks ago I treated myself to the 3/8" brushless impact wrench/driver/thingie cause it was on sale.  Used it a few times for small stuff and was happy enough.  Then I decided to pull the head off my old engine so I could start cleaning and see what killed it.  On a whim I put the correct socket on and tried to remove one of the headbolts. 

Holy crap.

I'm not sure if I am just not used to brushless, or if this thing is just that awesome, or what.  It gave the electric version of a couple light little "ugga-duggas" (vrra-whrrra"?) and then whatever circuit in there decided "it's big boy time" and just beared down on it and the little ugga-duggas went to UGGA-DUGGAs and spun it out.  Took every head bolt out of the almost 30 year old engine like it was nothing.  Other than picking up about 100lbs of cast iron and aluminum (no, I didn't remove the manifolds, because I am an idiot) it was cake

FooBag (Forum Supporter)
FooBag (Forum Supporter) GRM+ Memberand Reader
11/23/20 2:04 p.m.
Mr_Asa said:
Mr_Asa said:

I chose Ryobi, FWIW.  Very much enjoying the circular saw.

 

Just an update

Couple weeks ago I treated myself to the 3/8" brushless impact wrench/driver/thingie cause it was on sale.  Used it a few times for small stuff and was happy enough.  Then I decided to pull the head off my old engine so I could start cleaning and see what killed it.  On a whim I put the correct socket on and tried to remove one of the headbolts. 

Holy crap.

I'm not sure if I am just not used to brushless, or if this thing is just that awesome, or what.  It gave the electric version of a couple light little "ugga-duggas" (vrra-whrrra"?) and then whatever circuit in there decided "it's big boy time" and just beared down on it and the little ugga-duggas went to UGGA-DUGGAs and spun it out.  Took every head bolt out of the almost 30 year old engine like it was nothing.  Other than picking up about 100lbs of cast iron and aluminum (no, I didn't remove the manifolds, because I am an idiot.)

That's really interesting to hear!  I've been having a hard time swallowing the price premium to upgrade to Milwaukee (even though I know they're worth it), since I'm more of a light duty user.  I saw that the Ryobi HP tools were starting to hit the market and was curious if they would be that much better.  If they come out with a HP version the 1/2" impact, I'll probably take the plunge.  They have so MANY unique tool offerings that could come in useful.

L5wolvesf
L5wolvesf HalfDork
11/23/20 2:43 p.m.

I was gifted a Ryobi 18 volt set back in 2006 (the dark blue ones) or so. I still have that set and have gone on to acquire a bunch of other of their 18v tools - maybe 15 different ones. I generally don't mistreat my tools they do get dropped occasionally. The reciprocating saw and battery dropped once from the top of a 10 ft ladder. Didn't break and barely a scratch either. I buy mostly used tools off CL and no problems with them.

While the NiCad batteries eventually wore out the Lithium batteries just keep going. 

captdownshift (Forum Supporter)
captdownshift (Forum Supporter) GRM+ Memberand UltimaDork
11/23/20 4:20 p.m.

I eventually went ridgid due to the warranty, it including batteries and the savings over the Milwaukee, even though the Milwaukee is the measuri stick. I got the 1/2 octane 18v  hi torque (1400lb ft) and the 3/8 stubby 18v (150lb ft). The high torque is impressive, especially after hitting anything with sea foam deep creep. 

accordionfolder
accordionfolder SuperDork
11/23/20 9:52 p.m.

https://www.dewalt.com/products/power-tools/products-made-in-the-usa

I'm not overly nationalistic or anything, but I do like that DeWalt still does some manufacturing in the US. I have a metric ton of Ryobi and think I'll probably use it for my yard stuff, but want to switch to DeWalt for my more industrial tools. My Ryobi impact has never been a power house and is starting to really show it's age, etc

Ian F (Forum Supporter)
Ian F (Forum Supporter) MegaDork
11/23/20 10:51 p.m.

About 90% of the tools I see contractors use at construction sites are Milwaukee.  Then a smattering of Makita. 

Personally, I'm so far down the old 18V DeWalt rabbit hole that I ended up buying one of the 20V adapters.  It works well enough on my older 1/2" impact, but that tool was never all that great at removing anything other than small car lug nuts.  I agree the cordless circular saw has been a disappointment.   I have been very happy with the 12V DeWalt impact driver and drill set.  Most of the time I don't need or want the extra bulk of the 18V or 20V tools.  Especially when I'm working over my head for an extended time.

If I had to start over from zero - definitely the Milwaukee M12 and M18 tools.  The only complaints I've ever heard about those is the cost.  And the M12 driver is even more compact and lightweight than my 12V DeWalt driver.

twowheeled
twowheeled New Reader
11/24/20 11:12 a.m.

I'm on team red too, the stubby is almost good enough to handle lug nuts but it does require a big battery and there's often one or two nuts it can't do so I grumble about having just brought out the bigger gun in the first place. The warranty is top notch though I just brought in a m18 battery I was given from work that stopped taking a charge and walked out with a new one in minutes.

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