NOHOME
NOHOME MegaDork
1/21/21 2:00 p.m.

My friend Mustang brought this thing along a while back and I dont think he will be allowed to take it home. Ever.

 

So far it has proven to be the easy cheap and bullet-proof way to make brake line flares. $40 Cnd. 

 

MadScientistMatt
MadScientistMatt UltimaDork
1/21/21 2:07 p.m.

How does it work?

And does the special punch grease actually smell good enough to tempt people into eating it?

DeadSkunk  (Warren)
DeadSkunk (Warren) PowerDork
1/21/21 2:13 p.m.

....and where does one find one of these tools?

paddygarcia
paddygarcia New Reader
1/21/21 2:21 p.m.

I got a similar took from ECS last year (https://www.ecstuning.com/b-bav-auto-tools-parts/on-vehicle-micro-brake-pipe-flaring-tool-bavarian-autosport/b8800083~bav/). With copper-nickel line it's like butter to use and does fit into smaller places as needed.

The punch grease is too thick to drink or even mix with, but definitely makes that other guy's face feel smoother when you belt him one.

Cooter
Cooter UberDork
1/21/21 4:10 p.m.

 Summit has one that looks identical, but the Q&A claims it doesn't have to do bubble flares?

NOHOME
NOHOME MegaDork
1/21/21 4:44 p.m.

In reply to DeadSkunk (Warren) :

Princess Auto of course!

The key seems to be that the mandrel that does the first operation is not floating on the end of a cone. Only does the one size but that is the only brake line size I have ever done.

 

If I need a bubble flare, I will just stop after the first operation, It is what I used to do when I only had the standard kit and bubble flares were a rare thing.

 

 

RoddyMac17
RoddyMac17 Reader
1/21/21 4:58 p.m.

Pete

The tool out your way must be cheaper than on the Wet Coast, they want $60 canuck bucks for them (or at least that's what the website says Flaring Tool).

 

 

sevenracer
sevenracer Reader
1/23/21 8:01 a.m.

So, this does 45 degree flares not the 37 degree that Japanese cars use. Sounds like it is pretty common for people to make 45 degree flares for Japanese cars and just crank down on the fittings.  Is that an acceptable strategy?

noddaz
noddaz UltraDork
1/23/21 6:45 p.m.
sevenracer said:

So, this does 45 degree flares not the 37 degree that Japanese cars use. Sounds like it is pretty common for people to make 45 degree flares for Japanese cars and just crank down on the fittings.  Is that an acceptable strategy?

As long as you are driving in front of me, yes.

Brake line flares are no place for short cuts.

sevenracer
sevenracer Reader
1/24/21 1:24 p.m.

So, I the info I got from a "racing" webpage  - indicating Miata's have the 37 degree fittings - appears to be incorrect.

 

This company that sells brake lines states "Automotive fittings are always a 45 deg. double or DIN flare. Never use a single 45 degree flare with automotive nuts and fittings. A 37 degree single flare is acceptable for use in AN/JIC nuts and fittings with Cunifer seamless tubing"

 http://www.fedhillusa.com/webnuts/common%20flares6.pdf

Also, I think Keith Tanner indicated the same in another post I found from a couple of years ago.

 

Need to make a line for the first time (always just bought pre-made in the past).  Looks like this tool is a good option at $50 vs some of the other kits I've found for $180+.

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