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The Staff of Motorsport Marketing
The Staff of Motorsport Marketing Writer
5/13/20 8:00 a.m.

Sponsored article presented by Maxxis Tires.

 

Today’s 200-treadwear tires have gotten fast–really fast–and have become a staple in autocross, time trials and endurance racing. But don’t forget their true purpose: At the end of the day, they’re designed for…

Read the rest of the story

David S. Wallens
David S. Wallens Editorial Director
5/13/20 12:55 p.m.

I have a question to the question: What other tire questions does the group have? Experts are standing by.

Thanks. 

DirtyBird222
DirtyBird222 UberDork
5/13/20 2:43 p.m.

Very interesting and entertaining Q&A. We've been running Maxxis VR-1s on our 94 Accord Champcar for the last two years and the Q&A segment about heat got the gears moving in my noggin about issues we've run into with the VR-1 in a hot setting. Sebring in September for a 14 hour race, I can't think of a more brutal venue for a tire when you factor in all variables such as heat, track surfaces, speeds, and so on. Once the track got hot in mid-day we started losing corner exit grip on the VR-1s, they would bite in great on entry; but, as the car apexed it would start to plow. At night when things started to cool off they went back to the same driving characteristics we had in the early hours of the race and eventually to a class victory. As mentioned, the heat also caused much more wear on the tires than our previous race in a much cooler setting. 

David S. Wallens
David S. Wallens Editorial Director
5/13/20 3:36 p.m.

I wonder, would shaving the VR-1 tires help? 

Patientzero
Patientzero GRM+ Memberand Reader
5/13/20 4:04 p.m.

How similar is the actual compound between the street and r-comp?   On a street tire is the better wet grip 100% due to the tread design or does differences in the compound help too?

KentF (Forum Supporter)
KentF (Forum Supporter) Reader
5/13/20 4:28 p.m.

What would be the coldest storage temperature you would want to allow for the 200 treadware and the R Comp tires?

David S. Wallens
David S. Wallens Editorial Director
5/13/20 6:35 p.m.

Good question and keep them coming. Spoiler alert: There's a part 2 in the works. 

Emilio700
Emilio700 New Reader
5/13/20 7:32 p.m.

In reply to David S. Wallens :

In our experience, yes. We were one of the race team asked to participate in early testing durin the development of the VR1 and RC1. Heat cycling is just heat x time. The longer the tread is exposed to heat, the harder it gets. The deeper the tread, the more it deforms, which generates more heat. The extra rubber mass also holds more heat. So a shorter tread has the double benefit of generating less heat and shedding whatever thermal load much faster than a full tread. Wehave shaved VR1's and RC1's for various events. Quicker than full tread and they actually last nearly as long. Proble is few shops still shave tires, fewer still know how to do it right and it ain't free. 

Emilio700
Emilio700 New Reader
5/13/20 7:37 p.m.

In reply to Patientzero :

Surprisingly, we have seen some of the latest 200tw EHP (extreme high performance) tires have lower durometer and faster wear rates than some older 100tw race tires. The softest wet specific race tires like a Hoosier H2O are actually designed to generate casing heat in the rain. They are fast in the rain even when cold but surreal once they heat up. Normal to come off track on full rainy day on H2O's and they're steaming, too hot to leave your hand on. The lack of sipe(tread grooves) and casing design are major factors in performance. EHP's ride like crap and are noisy. That's not tread design, that's casing design. The best current EHP's (A052, RE71R are far more sophisticated than the 100tw race tires of 15 years ago, like the NT01 for example.

adam525i (Forum Supporter)
adam525i (Forum Supporter) GRM+ Memberand HalfDork
5/13/20 8:47 p.m.

I liked this line "Yes, tread wear seems to be an issue that tire companies haven’t been able to overcome."

Jeez, I wonder why that is? lol

Anyways, very interesting and I'm looking forward to part 2 (also looking forward to eventually upgrading from 200 TW to R).

Vigo (Forum Supporter)
Vigo (Forum Supporter) MegaDork
5/13/20 10:56 p.m.

Im curious about the distribution of how tires shed heat. As in, how much goes into the rim, how much goes across the contact patch, how much goes to outside air, etc. This is just pure curiosity. 

carpeforza
carpeforza
5/14/20 7:38 a.m.

Up here in the North, we have track days and races early in the season with track temps right around freezing. Even worse, we have sessions only 15 minutes long and sometimes raining / snow. What type of tire would give you the fastest lap times for cold, wet, short race sessions?

frenchyd
frenchyd PowerDork
5/14/20 7:53 a.m.
adam525i (Forum Supporter) said:

I liked this line "Yes, tread wear seems to be an issue that tire companies haven’t been able to overcome."

Jeez, I wonder why that is? lol

Anyways, very interesting and I'm looking forward to part 2 (also looking forward to eventually upgrading from 200 TW to R).

Think of it this way. Kleenex tissue companies haven't figured out a way to continually reuse Kleenex either. 
Actually there is a way to get long wearing tires.  Use harder treads. Race with TW600. 

David S. Wallens
David S. Wallens Editorial Director
5/14/20 8:16 a.m.

In reply to frenchyd :

Or go slower. 

David S. Wallens
David S. Wallens Editorial Director
5/14/20 8:25 a.m.

I have joked with friends in the tire biz: Why can't you make a tire that's really fast and also long-wearing? Oh, and I only want to pay $75 for it. 

aw614
aw614 Reader
5/14/20 8:27 a.m.
carpeforza said:

Up here in the North, we have track days and races early in the season with track temps right around freezing. Even worse, we have sessions only 15 minutes long and sometimes raining / snow. What type of tire would give you the fastest lap times for cold, wet, short race sessions?

I wonder how the continental extreme contact or michelin p4s would hold up for those cold sessions, and as the day goes on swap to the 200tw stuff later on?

David S. Wallens
David S. Wallens Editorial Director
5/14/20 8:29 a.m.

In reply to aw614 :

FWIW, you do often see those tires in One Lap. 

collinskl1
collinskl1 GRM+ Memberand Reader
5/14/20 9:10 a.m.
Patientzero said:

How similar is the actual compound between the street and r-comp?   On a street tire is the better wet grip 100% due to the tread design or does differences in the compound help too?

Compound and tread pattern both have a role. A "slick" tire with a good wet compound would be fine in damp/wet conditions with no pooling or running water, as hydroplaning would not be a consideration. The rubber compounds trade off fillers between carbon black and silica to tune dry/wet performance. Of course, it's waaaaayyyyy more complicated than that, with all the other performance considerations.

DirtyBird222
DirtyBird222 UberDork
5/14/20 9:47 a.m.
Emilio700 said:

In reply to Patientzero :

Surprisingly, we have seen some of the latest 200tw EHP (extreme high performance) tires have lower durometer and faster wear rates than some older 100tw race tires. The softest wet specific race tires like a Hoosier H2O are actually designed to generate casing heat in the rain. They are fast in the rain even when cold but surreal once they heat up. Normal to come off track on full rainy day on H2O's and they're steaming, too hot to leave your hand on. The lack of sipe(tread grooves) and casing design are major factors in performance. EHP's ride like crap and are noisy. That's not tread design, that's casing design. The best current EHP's (A052, RE71R are far more sophisticated than the 100tw race tires of 15 years ago, like the NT01 for example.

You left out RS-3/4. At least for a FWD race car. We could get 40+ hours of racing out of a set and never felt performance peel back over the life. 

Coupefan
Coupefan Reader
5/14/20 10:47 a.m.

I won't  even bother looking at the list of available sizes, as I'm almost certain they're not catering to vehicles with smaller wheel diameters. 

L5wolvesf
L5wolvesf Reader
5/14/20 6:48 p.m.

How would these work on a dirt oval that is restricted to DOT tires?

GameboyRMH
GameboyRMH GRM+ Memberand MegaDork
5/15/20 2:02 p.m.
Coupefan said:

I won't  even bother looking at the list of available sizes, as I'm almost certain they're not catering to vehicles with smaller wheel diameters. 

There are plenty of good tires still being made for 15" wheels.

Curtis73 (Forum Supporter)
Curtis73 (Forum Supporter) GRM+ Memberand MegaDork
5/15/20 2:44 p.m.
David S. Wallens said:

I have a question to the question: What other tire questions does the group have? Experts are standing by.

Thanks. 

I would LOVE to get deep into tire tech.  I would love to know what goes INTO a tire and what those quantities produce in terms of qualities.... like higher plutonium content increases sticktion, increased dilithium crystals helps keep it more stable in wider temps, more dicktonium prevents UV damage, etc.

I know a little about tread patterns and how certain blocks do better in mud, snow, dry, quiet, rain, etc, but I've always had to trust the manufacturer that when they say 300TW and "all season high performance" that they will fall into a certain category... and I'm usually disappointed by at least one advertised parameter.

I want to know all there is to know.

Curtis73 (Forum Supporter)
Curtis73 (Forum Supporter) GRM+ Memberand MegaDork
5/15/20 2:57 p.m.
David S. Wallens said:

I have joked with friends in the tire biz: Why can't you make a tire that's really fast and also long-wearing? Oh, and I only want to pay $75 for it. 

I totally understand that and this kinda points up my previous post.  Take for instance brake pads or clutch material.  The different materials that go into them all have pros and cons, but the mingling of possible combinations of those materials can make them more than the sum of their parts.

- brake fade/temp
- longevity
- noise
- dust
- brake torque

Of those qualities, manufacturers have been able to mix and match ingredients so that it isn't a direct trade-off.  You can have brake pads that excel at both dust and fade (ceramic), or pads that provide good brake torque and longevity (semi-metallic) etc. I'm wondering how those ingredient-mingling properties work for tires.... or if I'm just making assumptions that aren't really valid.  I don't expect to be able to formulate a magic tire for $75, but I feel like tires are advertised like a parts store advertises brake pads:  You get the value line, the silver line, or the gold line without really knowing what is in the box.  At least with brakes, you can open the box and see what you're getting.  I feel like tire manufacturers just write up marketing blurbs about how "this tire has exceptional performance for your family sedan in most categories, and is also good at everything else, and they have a 360 TW.  Good luck guessing how they'll actually suit your driving style."

z31maniac
z31maniac MegaDork
5/15/20 3:45 p.m.
David S. Wallens said:

I have joked with friends in the tire biz: Why can't you make a tire that's really fast and also long-wearing? Oh, and I only want to pay $75 for it. 

Quintessential GRM. :)

"Yes, why isn't Ford building a track-ready, four-door wagon, with 500hp, manual gearbox, and RWD for $18,990?"

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