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Mazdax605
Mazdax605 UltraDork
9/6/15 11:17 a.m.

So I'm replacing the rotors, pads, and hub assemblies on my 04 suburban. Of course GM has to use the most useless type of fasteners on the brake caliper pins. I borrowed the T55 bit from my brother in law. Twisted it pretty good getting the passengers side off. Broke a few teeth on it trying to get the drivers side off. Why would they use these things on a pretty important fastener? Any tricks to get these loose without twisting the bit or breaking it? I'm off to buy a new one or two once my wife gets home from the grocery store.

Toyman01
Toyman01 GRM+ Memberand MegaDork
9/6/15 11:27 a.m.

In reply to Mazdax605:

Buy a quality tip with a socket base and gently hit it with an impact. Not full on, just a tap, tap, tap, about as fast as you can say it. It works every time for me.

Knurled
Knurled UltimaDork
9/6/15 11:52 a.m.

GM has been using Torx on the brakes since the 80s.

karlt_10
karlt_10 Reader
9/6/15 12:08 p.m.

Some use Torx, some use hex. Never understood reasoning.

Dr. Hess
Dr. Hess MegaDork
9/6/15 12:09 p.m.

When you go to Vato-Zone and there's a Torx bit labeled: "GM Brake Caliper Tool," that's a hint.

Grtechguy
Grtechguy UltimaDork
9/6/15 12:22 p.m.

My chrysler minivans use Torx bits for the headlamp/taillights.

Sorry, the average person doesn't have access to those and it definitely shouldn't not be a dealer task.

novaderrik
novaderrik UltimaDork
9/6/15 12:45 p.m.

my mom's 86 Mustang had torx bolts for the brake calipers, so it isn't jsut GM.

GM has been using allen head or torx head bolts for caliper bolts on a lot of brake caliper mounts since the 1960's.

use a good quality bit and they are better than a hex head.. use a poor quality bit and your life gets more complicated than it needs to be...

HiTempguy
HiTempguy PowerDork
9/6/15 12:49 p.m.

Torx is a better system, less likely to round out the head. I've never broken teeth off a torx, which are a lot more common in Canada because THEY MAKE SENSE AND ALLEN HEADS SUCK BALLS

As someone said, use better quality tools.

Streetwiseguy
Streetwiseguy PowerDork
9/6/15 1:07 p.m.

Torx first showed up in my life on Fords in 1980. Its time for you to buy a set of Torx sockets.

The_Jed
The_Jed UberDork
9/6/15 1:21 p.m.

The "5.0 H.O" cover plate on the upper plenum of my Lincoln has renewed my hate for small torx bits. Big ones are fine, the itty bitty berkeleyers snap too easily.

m4ff3w
m4ff3w GRM+ Memberand UltraDork
9/6/15 2:24 p.m.
Grtechguy wrote: My chrysler minivans use Torx bits for the headlamp/taillights. Sorry, the average person doesn't have access to those and it definitely shouldn't not be a dealer task.

The average person doesn't have access to Torx bits? They are pretty darn ubiquitous now.

Keith Tanner
Keith Tanner GRM+ Memberand MegaDork
9/6/15 2:32 p.m.

If you can't manage to source Torx bits, you should reevaluate your decision to work on a car.

Mike
Mike GRM+ Memberand Dork
9/6/15 3:15 p.m.

Having won a point at pub trivia more than once by correctly identifying a torx fastener, I believe most of the population doesn't know. Once, I was the only one to get he point, and another, it was me and another guy who also looked confused about how the question was not more broadly answered.

I don't think torx should be on fasteners used to access wear items that are generally customer replaceable. As I try to define this, I acknowledge it is fuzzy. At the least, oil changes, air filters and bulbs other than instrument backlighting should not require torx.

fritzsch
fritzsch Dork
9/6/15 3:20 p.m.
Toyman01 wrote: In reply to Mazdax605: Buy a quality tip with a socket base and gently hit it with an impact. Not full on, just a tap, tap, tap, about as fast as you can say it. It works every time for me.

Arent they usually on the back side of the caliper and not a lot of space to get an impact in there?

moparman76_69
moparman76_69 UltraDork
9/6/15 3:26 p.m.

Chrysler used etorx head bolts on the crank pulley on some early 2.2s.

bgkast
bgkast GRM+ Memberand UberDork
9/6/15 3:45 p.m.

You guys should stay away from sweedish cars if you don't like torx bolts.

Knurled
Knurled UltimaDork
9/6/15 3:55 p.m.
Mike wrote: I don't think torx should be on fasteners used to access wear items that are generally customer replaceable. As I try to define this, I acknowledge it is fuzzy. At the least, oil changes, air filters and bulbs other than instrument backlighting should not require torx.

Because Phillips-head fasteners that round out are so much better.

Torx is awesome. The only fastener more awesome is XZN because it has all of the advantages of Torx, while having a much larger root diameter for the tool.

fasted58
fasted58 UltimaDork
9/6/15 3:57 p.m.
Toyman01 wrote: In reply to Mazdax605: Buy a quality tip with a socket base and gently hit it with an impact. Not full on, just a tap, tap, tap, about as fast as you can say it. It works every time for me.

^ this

Toyman01
Toyman01 GRM+ Memberand MegaDork
9/6/15 3:59 p.m.
fritzsch wrote:
Toyman01 wrote: In reply to Mazdax605: Buy a quality tip with a socket base and gently hit it with an impact. Not full on, just a tap, tap, tap, about as fast as you can say it. It works every time for me.
Arent they usually on the back side of the caliper and not a lot of space to get an impact in there?

Turn the wheel and a 3/8 impact will fit with room to spare.

Ayers_Garage
Ayers_Garage New Reader
9/6/15 4:01 p.m.

I usually crank the steering over and use my little SnapOn 3/8 impact. No skinned knuckles that way.

About two or three decades ago I bought a nice rack of Mac brand torx bits off the tool truck. They're all still alive and doing well all these years later, even with often being impact driven. It's just the cost of doing business. I've sure spent more on lesser used tools than my torx bits.

Knurled
Knurled UltimaDork
9/6/15 4:24 p.m.

In reply to Ayers_Garage:

Problem is, tool prices have skyrocketed. IIRC a new set of Torx sockets is in the $400 range.

m4ff3w
m4ff3w GRM+ Memberand UltraDork
9/6/15 5:45 p.m.
Knurled wrote: In reply to Ayers_Garage: Problem is, tool prices have skyrocketed. IIRC a new set of Torx sockets is in the $400 range.

The tool truck isn't the only place to get tools....

I've got a set that has been abused with impact gun, I picked it up at AutoZone, sub $30 with lifetime warranty.

daeman
daeman Reader
9/6/15 6:23 p.m.

Brakes are a safety item, kinda makes sense to use a fastener that Joe average dumbberkeley cant undo... The dealer, or any well equipped workshop etc will have the right tool and not see it as a problem. Torx isn't just for tamper proofing, but it does definitely help.

Not having a go at you op. But manufacturers want to keep under skilled people from screwing up their product.

Mike
Mike GRM+ Memberand Dork
9/6/15 6:38 p.m.
Knurled wrote:
Mike wrote: I don't think torx should be on fasteners used to access wear items that are generally customer replaceable. As I try to define this, I acknowledge it is fuzzy. At the least, oil changes, air filters and bulbs other than instrument backlighting should not require torx.
Because Phillips-head fasteners that round out are so much better. Torx is awesome. The only fastener more awesome is XZN because it has all of the advantages of Torx, while having a much larger root diameter for the tool.

False dichotomy. Just as poor quality torx is a problem, poor quality philips is a problem. Torx does tend to have more positive engagement and better resistance to stripping, but using a high quality philips tool will go a long way toward successful driving.

Still, that has nothing to do with me favoring philips. I favor philips because there are maybe three sizes to cover most situations that aren't electronics or watches, and you can usually get by with the wrong size anyway. Pretty close to everyone owns at least one philips screwdriver. You can buy them at just about any store. There is a good chance you already have one in your car, or on your keychain, pocket knife or purse.

I've ruined a lot of philips fasteners, and I still think it has a place.

I am starting to question my life decisions, since I'm on the internet arguing about the advantages of philips over torx. Clearly, mistakes have been made.

T.J.
T.J. UltimaDork
9/6/15 7:36 p.m.

In reply to Mike:

Nah, you are looking at it all wrong. As others have stated, most people don't know what a torx fastener is much less able to debate its relative merots versus another fastener. You are doing well with your decision making.

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