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kb58
kb58 UltraDork
11/8/22 10:25 a.m.

In reply to livinon2wheels :

Hah, I used to track a Datsun 1200... 1200 CC, so I'm fully qualified for "driving a slow car fast."

te72
te72 HalfDork
11/8/22 10:40 a.m.

I've come to realize that my hobbies in the garage were a great outlet for creativity, but they were rooted in being a distraction from the crushing loneliness of my early 20's. I still enjoy what comes out of the garage these days, but I don't live for it like I used to. There's a lot more to enjoy in life. =)

kb58
kb58 UltraDork
11/8/22 10:43 a.m.
te72 said:

I've come to realize that my hobbies in the garage were a great outlet for creativity, but they were rooted in being a distraction from the crushing loneliness of my early 20's. I still enjoy what comes out of the garage these days, but I don't live for it like I used to. There's a lot more to enjoy in life. =)

Agree, but depending on one's situation, they may or may not have disposable income to be out doing things and going places. Gardening and working in the garage are about as inexpensive as activities can get. There'll be time enough for TV and puzzles later...

AndyHess
AndyHess New Reader
11/8/22 11:15 a.m.

Hey.  Activity - Work and play - can be like an addiction.  And to paraphrase a horrid meme - "just say no."  (Sorry). Not sure there is a good way to slow down other than to just slow down.  'Course the awful truth could be that is just who we are. . . .

audiguy
audiguy New Reader
11/8/22 10:32 p.m.

As I have gotten older, I've tried to live by the mantra of doing fewer things better....lower stress has been a welcomed by product of this strategy....

Datsun310Guy
Datsun310Guy MegaDork
11/8/22 11:10 p.m.

Alabama plugged into some of this theme. 

BTW Jeff Cook passed away yesterday- 72.

 

Tom1200
Tom1200 UberDork
11/8/22 11:14 p.m.

In reply to audiguy :

I like that.

jwagner (Forum Supporter)
jwagner (Forum Supporter) HalfDork
11/9/22 12:04 a.m.
audiguy said:

As I have gotten older, I've tried to live by the mantra of doing fewer things better....lower stress has been a welcomed by product of this strategy....

This.  I'd say cut back on the nonessential time filling projects and tasks and focus on what's important to you.  Leaving some slack time will allow other opportunities that you didn't realize that you really want to do to become possible.

In reply to livinon2wheels :  I went back to time trialing and tracking my "perfect" (built to my taste) Miata and I find it boring.  Less wrenching and track time next year and more travel and grandkids.

93EXCivic
93EXCivic MegaDork
11/9/22 9:00 a.m.
docwyte said:

I have no desire to work 50-60 hours now.  I can't wait to retire, nobody tells me how much vacation I can/can't take but my opportunity costs are so high to take it, I hardly ever do.  I want to get away for longer periods of time, can't do that now.  I'm gonna punch outta here as quickly as possible...

I am only 34 and I sure as E36 M3 ain't working 50-60 hour weeks regularly ever again. If someone asks expects me to do that, I'll be looking for a new job ASAP. Did it at a start up for a while and never doing it again.

car39
car39 Dork
11/9/22 9:40 a.m.

I wasn't planning on retirement, but when faced with another uber expensive building project, or taking the money and running, I put my track shoes on.  Found someone who liked my business more than I did, and haven't really looked back.  Completely upended my wife's life by moving to another state.  Started another (small) business by accident, and broke out of the canyon I had carved for myself over 43 years of work.  I've spent more time with my wife of 40 years in the last 9 years than I did in the previous 31.  I do things that no one who knew me ever thought I would do, like improv and acting.    I'm fortunate that we planned for this from Day 1 financially, which makes the decision easier.  The hardest part about retirement is figuring out what you're going to do now that you have a life, the best part of retirement is figuring out what to do now that you have a life.  

Purple Frog (Forum Supporter)
Purple Frog (Forum Supporter) GRM+ Memberand HalfDork
11/9/22 9:55 a.m.
93EXCivic said:
docwyte said:

I have no desire to work 50-60 hours now.  I can't wait to retire, nobody tells me how much vacation I can/can't take but my opportunity costs are so high to take it, I hardly ever do.  I want to get away for longer periods of time, can't do that now.  I'm gonna punch outta here as quickly as possible...

I am only 34 and I sure as E36 M3 ain't working 50-60 hour weeks regularly ever again. If someone asks expects me to do that, I'll be looking for a new job ASAP. Did it at a start up for a while and never doing it again.

There is a difference between working those hours for someone else, and working them for yourself.  Especially if its work you enjoy doing.   

I think what Tim realizes in his original post and others like myself have said can be summed up in a Jimmy Buffet lyric.     "It's my own damn fault!"

Paul_VR6 (Forum Supporter)
Paul_VR6 (Forum Supporter) UltraDork
11/9/22 10:16 a.m.
93EXCivic said:

I am only 34 and I sure as E36 M3 ain't working 50-60 hour weeks regularly ever again.

I remember fondly only having one job laugh the 40 for 'the man' is a bit easier to control. The rest to build my retirement gig is harder to control. It's easily 80-90 hour weeks but it's hard to call some of it work at all.

docwyte
docwyte PowerDork
11/9/22 2:47 p.m.

In reply to Purple Frog (Forum Supporter) :

Don't care.  Still don't want to work 50-60 hours a week.  While I like doing dentistry I don't want to be in my office working that much.  I'd rather be doing any number of other things.

kb58
kb58 UltraDork
11/9/22 9:20 p.m.

You guys who are getting close might like to check out the YT channel "Holy Schmidt." He's a financial planner guy who focuses on producing videos all about retiring. No connection, no relation.

frenchyd
frenchyd MegaDork
11/9/22 11:08 p.m.

My body slows me down. At age 74 I can't do some things I used to do. I used to enjoy cars that were wild track attack cars. That Were easy to get to the edge and brutally hard to keep on that knife edge.  Short wheelbase, narrow track, high power,   Now I'm building them more predictable.  
       Early in my flying career I talked with the fighter pilots on the ship.  Turns out the best of fighter planes are darn near impossible to fly.  I thought they were pulling my leg until I traded planes with a . Spad (  A1 D ) pilot.  He wanted some S2E time ( twin engine) and I wanted to know what a real fighter is  like.     
     I almost blew the take off. Just not used to that much torque.   I cleared the air space around North Island  then tried my hand at things those guys do in their sleep. Wow!   It's like you've never driven anything more than a Toyota Corolla  and suddenly  you're in a 427 Cobra. Things happen way faster than you're ready for it.  Suddenly  You're in a flat spin. With seconds to correct before you auger in.  Even coming out of that,  it's like you're 5 years old and just learning to ride a bike.  Wobbling all over the sky. 
     Anyway. There is a time to do stuff like that.   And a time when that is past.  

Tom1200
Tom1200 UberDork
11/9/22 11:20 p.m.

My solution seems to have been get a Gub-ment job. We don't view overtime as good stewardship of the taxpayers money.

tester (Forum Supporter)
tester (Forum Supporter) Reader
11/10/22 12:11 a.m.

A few months ago, I looked around and realized that I would be working 50 + hours a week for the rest of the year, be rewarded with 12+ hour days through the holidays, and then another 2 weeks of plant startup in January. At that point, I would have several weeks of comp time built up, that I obviously could not take because projects would be launching for the new year...
 

About the same time, one of our contract engineers had a heart attack and then my former manager who had just transferred out had one too, all within a couple of weeks. Both survived, but were told to take it down a notch.  I could easily see myself headed the same way. Needless to say, that changed the direction of my career. I pulled the ripcord on the corporate job, and now work from home for a small company. I still work some long hours on some days, but it is not every day.  

As I look back at my old job, I can see that  the company simply kept adding duties and responsibilities to my plate. It really wasn't the same job anymore. At some point, you have to say "no" to protect your health, your family life, and your ability to actually do good work. This can be very hard for driven, entrepreneurial folks to accept. 

 

kevlarcorolla
kevlarcorolla Dork
11/10/22 7:43 a.m.

As a licensed tradesman since the early 90's I've spent 30+ yrs making others money.

 Left 3 yrs ago to do my own 1 man sized jobs,best thing I did was focus on saying no to jobs too big or would overlap other jobs needing extra time spent at work.

 With the housing prices going nuts the last couple yrs we sold our "forever" home last yr (built in '17),bought ocean front in atlantic canada for pennies and will be building a nice little house come spring.

 Ride off into the sunset while doing the occasional odd job there,no more race cars will cut expenses a fair bit :)

ddavidv
ddavidv UltimaDork
11/10/22 7:54 a.m.

I'm almost 58. I'm quitting my career at 62. I'll probably still have to work until 65/Medicare but I'll just do something fun that doesn't pay much. I've taken quite a few 'staycations' where I just goof around at home doing whatever it is I feel like doing. It's fun, and I'm rarely bored. With my family history I doubt I'll live to see 80 so I don't intend on wasting any more time than necessary chasing the dollar. Fortunately, I live a pretty frugal life and have zero debt so it won't be a painful transition. 

russelljones48
russelljones48 New Reader
11/10/22 9:02 a.m.

after all of the apt comments, my only contribution would be a catchphrase that was mentioned to me by a friend and that I've adopted: QTR or Quality Time Remaining.  That "time" will take on a different aspect, I think, for each individual and vary with age.  For me it was a somewhat vague concept at 65. Now as I approach my 75th birthday it's much more defined and imperative given my family history.  I use it as a benchmark for many decisions on what and when I want to accomplish my life goals.      

frenchyd
frenchyd MegaDork
11/10/22 9:24 a.m.
kb58 said:

You guys who are getting close might like to check out the YT channel "Holy Schmidt." He's a financial planner guy who focuses on producing videos all about retiring. No connection, no relation. CB

The trouble with financial planners, is it's all about money. Spread sheets and gambling with money ( granted, with improved odds)   
  Retirement can and should be about change. Putting this as a priority over that.  Like to play golf?  Go for it!   Like to race but can't afford it on a retirement income?   Partner up with someone, build or fix race cars for others.  
     Need to downsize?   Good, do so. 
  At some point in your life, you will likely need some help to do things you've been doing since you were a youngster.  
 If you want that time to still be good for you,  don't wait until others select the help. As you see the need approaching,  try out some people. 
      You'll feel better knowing you are still in charge.   Don't make your last years a loading fight. 
       

z31maniac
z31maniac MegaDork
11/10/22 11:50 a.m.

I think this is one of those "if you have to ask the question, you already know the answer" type situations. 

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