1 2 3
mad_machine
mad_machine GRM+ Memberand SuperDork
11/17/10 2:32 p.m.

If the Beta2 is like the original Beta.. it is a pretty bullet proof engine provided you keep a healthy supply of oil in it. I did almost 140,000 miles on mine when the car it was in got wrecked. Even wrecked, it got me home.. with no coolant due to a hole in the radiator.

Change the oil somewhere between 3000 and 7500 (I prefered 5000) and used a good quality oil and filter. I used Mobil 1 and a K&N oil filter on mine

Bobzilla
Bobzilla Dork
11/17/10 2:52 p.m.

^ It is, same basic bottom end with a CVVT head for the newer ones. Engine itself will easily last 250k miles with no issues IF MAINTAINED.

iceracer
iceracer Dork
11/17/10 3:59 p.m.

3000 mile oil changes have gone the way of bias ply tires. Dealers and quick lubes push the 3K change for obvious reasons. I ran my ZX2 and my Liberty for changes once a year,8-9K miles for over 70K miles using a quality synthetic oil and various name brand filters. No problems at all. Ford is suggesting 10K mile changes on all of their 2011 cars. And my dealer still wants me to bring my 2011 Fiesta in at 3K miles for service.

Bobzilla
Bobzilla Dork
11/17/10 4:29 p.m.

So, now all cars are the same in their requirements or oil and filter changes? Interesting.... must mean that all filters are the same as well.... please disregard anything I've previously posted as this is definately much more accurate and model specific information.

Knurled
Knurled HalfDork
11/18/10 12:53 p.m.
Cone_Junky wrote: Maintenance schedule (Alldata) lists it at 7500 intervals for normal service and 3000 intervals for "severe" service schedule.

...and there isn't anywhere in the US that does not qualify as "severe".

Knurled
Knurled HalfDork
11/18/10 12:57 p.m.
iceracer wrote: Ford is suggesting 10K mile changes on all of their 2011 cars.

Motorcraft oil is actually a rather high quality synthetic blend.

If you're not using Motorcraft (or synthetic) and you do 10k oil changes... well, you're probably just going to throw the car away after three years like a good little consumer, so what difference does it make?

Strizzo
Strizzo SuperDork
11/18/10 2:28 p.m.
Knurled wrote:
iceracer wrote: Ford is suggesting 10K mile changes on all of their 2011 cars.
Motorcraft oil is actually a rather high quality synthetic blend. If you're not using Motorcraft (or synthetic) and you do 10k oil changes... well, you're probably just going to throw the car away after three years like a good little consumer, so what difference does it make?

Some. motorcraft oil is synthetic blend. its not all a blend, but i'm sure its all high quality.

i also have an oil cap off of a 66 mustang that says to change the oil and filter every 6,000 miles.

redbonechkn
redbonechkn New Reader
2/20/11 6:42 a.m.

When I worked at the KIA dealership we did 3000 miles and services every 30.000 if you wanted the warranty you had to gt the services done at the dealership with us hat was for the 100,000 warranty the factory was 60,000 of course those services were $500 dollars every 30,000 miles and don't let them catch you without a no KIA oil filter your claim was gone instantly

I have since left and found out not every KIA dealership runs this way but this particular one makes a killing on taking away your warranty if services aren't performed as requested at that dealership I don't know how but people kept coming back

Moparman
Moparman HalfDork
2/20/11 7:39 a.m.
Ranger50 wrote: You "should" stick to OEM, at least for the warranty period. Keep VERY detailed records. I know of a claim being rejected because of no records available. I also know of some cases where the owner used a very poor, but heavily marketed filter in the orange box, and nearly had the claim rejected after review by the DM. Brian

I agree. For cars I have under warranty I use the dealer for everything and follow there oil change schedule. It has helped during warranty claims over the years. In fact, ithas helped me with having the manufacturer paying for repairs just after the warranty period. It is all about being penny-wise and pound foolish. Stretch your oil change intervals if you'd like. Save a few bucks by doing the changes yourself if you must, but I would rather have all the ammunition I can get if there is a warranty claim.

Also, I only go more than 3000 miles on my non-warranty cars when using Mobil 1 or Red Line. I only use Mobil 1 or K&N filters.

Moparman
Moparman HalfDork
2/20/11 7:46 a.m.

In reply to redbonechkn:

Actually sounds fair. You want the insurance of a warranty, you pay the premium. People complain about insurance premiums of all kinds until they have a problem and the insurance is there. Dealer service is the premium for having the warranty.

Things I will never go cheap / generic with:

1) Oil (on the best and best filters)

2) Brakes. No generic or cheapy pads.

3) Tires: You will never see names like Jetzon, Revenger or even Mastercraft on my cars.

Curmudgeon
Curmudgeon SuperDork
2/20/11 8:03 a.m.

In the early days of the car which I consider to have ended in the early '70's with the advent of electronic ignition and emission controls the every six months tune up was considered a fact of life, couldn't get around it. This was the days when points had to be adjusted or replaced every 6-12K miles. (Those of you who don't know what points are, just bear with me.) Oil change intervals were 3k miles, transmission fluid 15k miles. That was with the technology of the times.

With every manufacturer it is the responsibility of the vehicle owner to properly maintain the vehicle at their own expense unless specified otherwise. In response to consumer complaints about what was considered excessive maintenance just for the sake of making money, the manufacturers started looking into ways to stretch the intervals. Changes in spark plug technology boosted those to 30k and in many instances 100k replacement intervals. Transmission fluid went to 30k, with some manufacturers spec'ing 100k under ideal conditions. (You still won't catch me going over 60k, though.)

Coolants went through a change as well, bringing us the infamous Dex Cool brown goop fiasco.

Engine oil operates under a whole different set of conditions than transmission fluid or coolant due to its close proximity to combustion. Engineers are engineers, not magicians. They can't change the conditions, they are what they are. But in response to those same demands, the dual service schedule was devised.

So what that means is some tightwad opens the book, sees the (alleged) ideal world service schedule, puts on their blinders and says 'Aha! I can go 7500 miles between oil changes, so sayeth the book.' But the book has no control over real world conditions. Contamination still happens.

So the consumer goes 7500 (this being the real world usually a bit more)between changes and at 60 or 70K encounters oil burning issues or even worse. Investigation reveals that the engine has sludge and goo. Of course it's the engine's fault. This is not made up; I have seen this first hand with every brand of vehicle I have worked with: Ford, GM, Toyota, Isuzu, Kia, Subaru, Mercedes etc etc etc.

Synthetics help but aren't the complete answer. It comes down to this: the most expensive oil change is cheaper than the cheapest engine. Which would you rather buy? FWIW, I change the Trooper's dino juice every 4500 or so. If it's race season meaning I tow more, every 3K.

One other thing: engine coolant temperature has a LOT to do with oil longevity. The 190 or so coolant temp is what the engineers have spec'd. A thermostat stuck open will keep the engine temps down and oil (and fuel) consumption will go up. I've had this happen to me!

By the way, as outlined by the Magnuson-Moss Act the dealership cannot 'take away your warranty'. Only the vehicle manufacturer can do that and they better have a damn good reason. If the dealership has reason to believe there is a non-warrantable reason for a failure, they MUST notify the manufacturers' rep who will then investigate and make the call.

Per the M-M, if a certain OEM maintenance part (such as a filter) is REQUIRED to preserve your warranty that part must be supplied by the manufacturer at no charge during the warranty period. Otherwise, a non-OE part can be used. BUT- if a failure can be shown to be as a result of the failure of that non-OE part then the manufacturer has the right to deny that claim.

If there is an aftermarket 'extended warranty' (actually a mechanical breakdown insurance policy, big difference!) involved then they can write the rules to suit themselves (up to a point).

Wally
Wally SuperDork
2/20/11 10:42 a.m.
Moparman wrote: 3) Tires: You will never see names like Jetzon, Revenger or even Mastercraft on my cars.

Wandering off topic, I haven't seen Jetzons in some time. When I was a kid we had to use street tires on my dad's stock car. Jetzons were as soft as the Hoosiers the late models ran, but were cheap and legal. Every few weeks one of mom's errends would be to run out and pick up a set.

Ranger50
Ranger50 HalfDork
2/20/11 11:15 a.m.

The old tire names have morphed into Dean, Prime Well, and ElDorado. I see lots and lots of odd named Chinese tires too.

I don't have a problem with Mastercrafts. I sold the hell out of them at the dealer with no problems.

Moparman
Moparman HalfDork
2/20/11 1:12 p.m.

I don't go cheaper than Kumho, usually. Never a generic or store brand. DK if there is anything wwroneg with them, but why chance it? I find that Tire Rack reviews have been pretty reliable. I have yet to be disappointed.

Tom Heath
Tom Heath Web Manager
2/21/11 9:21 a.m.

Completely off topic-

I've seen a few errors in the log from someone with an incomplete user profile trying to subscribe to this thread; if you're the getting the error screen when you click the heart icon at the bottom of the page, please click here to send me an email so I can fix it.

Thanks, please carry on.

Turboeric
Turboeric New Reader
2/21/11 1:11 p.m.
Junkyard_Dog wrote:
Bobzilla wrote: Read the manual on what "severe" conditions are. It boils down to about 90% of the US would fit their "severe" conditions.
This is true. Also how long are you planning on keeping it? Most of the factory intervals are designed to get you through the warranty period and thats it. If you plan on keeping the car for 100k+ miles isn't it worth it do err on the side of caution and service the car more frequently? To put it another way: Would you prefer to buy more oil changes now or an engine later?

I disagree. I routinely keep all my vehicles for 200,000 miles and have never done more frequent oil changes than the "normal service" intervals. They've all been 4 cylinder and all get run hard. I've never had an engine that I didn't know where the rev limiter was. With all of that, I've never had a lubrication related engine problem since I started doing this 45 years ago.

Bobzilla
Bobzilla Dork
2/21/11 1:43 p.m.
Turboeric wrote:
Junkyard_Dog wrote:
Bobzilla wrote: Read the manual on what "severe" conditions are. It boils down to about 90% of the US would fit their "severe" conditions.
This is true. Also how long are you planning on keeping it? Most of the factory intervals are designed to get you through the warranty period and thats it. If you plan on keeping the car for 100k+ miles isn't it worth it do err on the side of caution and service the car more frequently? To put it another way: Would you prefer to buy more oil changes now or an engine later?
I disagree. I routinely keep all my vehicles for 200,000 miles and have never done more frequent oil changes than the "normal service" intervals. They've all been 4 cylinder and all get run hard. I've never had an engine that I didn't know where the rev limiter was. With all of that, I've never had a lubrication related engine problem since I started doing this 45 years ago.

Good for you! Too bad my personal and professional experience does not agree.

redbonechkn
redbonechkn New Reader
2/21/11 2:15 p.m.

We had a guy that bought a optima and thought it was a Porsche he only bought Kia brand parts from us for it....Two wiper blades $99.89 from us he opened them and I installed them for him they were AMCO blades he could've gotten at Autozone for $8.000 but he was sure that the kia ones were better

New Reader
1/19/13 12:45 p.m.

I know this is an old post, of my own Im resurrecting. But there was a good point somewhere in here, I have a 65 Mustang 6 cylinder that says 6k for oil changes. Why was this recommended even in the 60s but Ive always heard 3k before using synthetic?

Curmudgeon
Curmudgeon MegaDork
1/19/13 2:24 p.m.

That's a good question. I don't recall ever seeing a 6k interval when I worked with Ford back in the 1980's, and we still saw a fair number of '70's era cars then.

dean1484
dean1484 GRM+ Memberand UltraDork
1/19/13 4:30 p.m.
Datsun1500 wrote: A better question is why is everyone subscribed to this thread? Every profile you look at is subscribed to it.

Admins should look at this as I DID NOT subscribe to this and yet I am subscribed. Not that it is not interesting but something weird is a-foot. I sense a disturbance in the force.

airwerks
airwerks New Reader
1/19/13 8:41 p.m.

I worked at a dealership for 7 years as a service writer.... we only denied an engine claim once. It was an intrepid with 27000 miles on it and the filter on the motor had factory installed still printed on it. Once you open an engine up it is pretty obvious if its been neglected or not. That was the first time we ever asked for oil change records......

philndz
philndz New Reader
1/22/13 9:35 a.m.

I never understand why this is so confusing to people. For Hyundai/Kia, 7500 miles is the warranty cut-off. If you want to change your oil at 7500 miles, that is fine......but if you change it at 7501, just be aware you are putting your warranty at risk. Does the manufacturer request proof of oil changes? Yes. Would they deny an engine claim for being one mile over on an oil change interval? Not likely....but why would you risk it. Somebody also mentioned the severe schedule, which takes temperature into account, and yes....most places have enough temperature swings/extremes to qualify on the severe schedule.

Bobzilla
Bobzilla UltraDork
1/22/13 9:51 a.m.

All of my Hyundai's if you wait to 7500miles, yo're out of oil. 6k miles, you're fine with the way I drive. But when we lived in town, any more than 3000 miles and it looked worse than diesel oil. Depends on your drive.

FSP_ZX2
FSP_ZX2 Dork
1/22/13 9:59 a.m.

While we're talking Betas, do they really need a timing belt at 60k? I am at 59K on my 2011 Elantra-Touring...

1 2 3
Our Preferred Partners
SmfWfpzALVAZgeK9urw2KAWtBhZHdvvt5OIJzwEOPYrrw0s7SkyDv05Jwt3fSGCu