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RussellH
RussellH Reader
3/21/09 12:48 p.m.

I'm getting ready to install my bendpak P6 lift that's been sitting in the garage for almost a year now. Can I drill in the concrete without a hammer-drill? do I need a special drill-bit or the multi-purpose B&D drills will work?

I'd hate to have to buy a hammer drill for 6 holes.

EastCoastMojo
EastCoastMojo Dork
3/21/09 12:51 p.m.

My understanding is that an impact drill is the way to go and it does take special bits for concrete work.

SVreX
SVreX SuperDork
3/21/09 1:02 p.m.

Rent a hammer drill at your local tool rental store. They can help you with the right bit, too. You'll need carbide or diamond (your twist drills won't even come close- they will melt during the first hole).

The holes you will be drilling are large. You need a good tool.

Actually, I was thinking 2 post lift- your scissor style will have significantly less strain on the bolts (and they are probably smaller), but you should still make DARNED SURE you are installing COMPLETELY in accordance with the manufacturer's specs. Read them carefully. They will probably discuss concrete thickness, type of bolt, anchoring method, grade of bolt, etc.

It's a car lift. It can kill you.

Kramer
Kramer Reader
3/21/09 1:24 p.m.
SVreX wrote: Rent a hammer drill at your local tool rental store. They can help you with the right bit, too. You'll need carbide or diamond (your twist drills won't even come close- they will melt during the first hole).

What he said. Seriously.

Jensenman
Jensenman SuperDork
3/21/09 1:25 p.m.

Plus 1 on renting the hammer drill. I just did 4 5/8" holes with a carbide masonry bit and a regular 1/2" drill, it was a PITA.

Like SvreX says, don't mess around because your life depends on this being mounted properly! The last thing you need is one side coming adrift with a ~2500 pund car on it.

sachilles
sachilles Reader
3/21/09 1:39 p.m.

A decent hammer drill isn't all that expensive, and sometimes it is nice to have a nice corded drill around the house. A good drill bit is worth the extra money spent on it.

Appleseed
Appleseed Reader
3/21/09 2:23 p.m.
    1. A good hammer drill is really expensive. Especially if you only need 6 holes. True hammer drills are not like a cordless drill. Hammer drills are way heavy and way awkward to lug around the house to drill holes in oak trim.
bludroptop
bludroptop Dork
3/21/09 2:37 p.m.

This is the sort of thing Harbor Freight is perfect for - a tool you will use once in a blue moon.

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumber=45338

They have a cheaper one than that, but I'd pay the extra $10 to get the orange one. Their orange tools almost always last for a while if you only use them once or twice a year.

sachilles
sachilles Reader
3/21/09 2:39 p.m.

This the one I have, and have been very happy with it. Used it to drill dozens of holes in a foundation wall. craftsman drill

cwh
cwh Dork
3/21/09 4:47 p.m.

30 years of experience drilling in concrete. Hammer drill, corded, minimum 1/2". I always used a pro grade drill, but was doing it all the time. Carbide tip masonry drill bit. MAKE SURE YOU ARE USING THE CORRECT FASTENERS!!!!! There are a number of anchors that will work in concrete, but ONLY use the one recomended by the manufacturer. They will probably be one of the expansion types, but again, only use the one they require. Also, try real hard not to drill off vertical. You want a straight hole to the depth they are after. This is no time to get sloppy or cheap out.

pete240z
pete240z Dork
3/21/09 6:28 p.m.

what this guy above said. if he has 30 years experience and is talking......listen

Dr. Hess
Dr. Hess SuperDork
3/21/09 7:02 p.m.

Like cwh sez regarding the fasteners. Home Depot/Lowes sell masonary drill bits. Get the right size for whatever fastener you are using. I put one shop's base plates down into concrete with Redhats with a cordless Makita drill with the right masonary bit. I would get one hole per charge. It took a while. The next shop, I bought a corded 1/2" Makita hammer drill and used the same bit. Went in like butter. So, could you drill 6 holes with what you have if you bought a masonary bit? Yeah, probably. But it will go a lot faster if you get a hammer drill. I bet that HF one isn't too much and will do 6 holes for you.

RussellH
RussellH Reader
3/21/09 9:53 p.m.

Thanks guys, I guess I have to go either rent or buy a 1/2" drill bit and a couple of masonry drill bits. All the hardware came with the lift so I'll be using exactly what the manufacturer sent me. I spent most of today unpacking and setting it up. It's not ready for use yet but it's working as expected. Just needs to be fastened to the concrete properly before I actually use it.

While we're on the topic of concrete how do I cut a channel into the concrete to route the hydraulic lines. What do I need to cut concrete that way. Here's an example:

http://pubpages.unh.edu/~jjy9/liftnocar.jpg

I also need to contact bendpak about their Step 7 in instructions which talks about air lines, there were none included nor do I see anywhere they'd hook up. It's all hydraulic based so not sure what the air lines are supposed to do. Maybe the lift comes in two configurations hydraulic or air.

Mazdax605
Mazdax605 Reader
3/21/09 10:13 p.m.

Hilti

EastCoastMojo
EastCoastMojo Dork
3/21/09 10:17 p.m.

I went to bendpak's site and I was unable to locate any price info. Would you mind sharing the cost of that lift? That's pretty badass.

RussellH
RussellH Reader
3/21/09 10:36 p.m.

Check out this link from another owner:

http://pubpages.unh.edu/~jjy9/liftnocar.jpg

For me the cost was $1800+tax but usually they go for about $2300. I wish they were slightly less expensive than the 2 post lifts because if I had the ideal garage I would've wanted the 2-poster. However, there are some advantages to this type of a lift with open access in the middle, it works like a 2 post lift but since you can park over it you don't lose any precious space in your average 2 car garage. Not to mention the ceiling issue with the 2 posters. Anyway, I thought long and hard about it and finally after mulling it over for 2 years I pulled the trigger when I got a bonus at work.

Appleseed
Appleseed Reader
3/22/09 12:37 a.m.

If you want nice clean straight channels, I'd use a gas powered demolition saw with a diamond tipped blade. Again, not cheap. Rent it, and in an hour or two, golden. Use your BFH to knock the concrete between the cuts loose.

ww
ww Dork
3/22/09 12:57 a.m.
RussellH wrote: For me the cost was $1800+tax but usually they go for about $2300. I wish they were slightly less expensive than the 2 post lifts because if I had the ideal garage I would've wanted the 2-poster.

This always amazed me too. You'd think the 2-post lift would be more expensive. It must have something to do with supply and demand. The demand for the P6 is considerably less than the demand for the 2-post so they manufacture a LOT more 2 post lifts than P6's lowering the cost of each unit.

I may put a P6 on the side of the house to work on the Lemons car...

Woody
Woody Dork
3/22/09 7:28 a.m.

Let's see, I have a hammer drill, you have a lift in your garage....where do you live?

cwh
cwh Dork
3/22/09 8:13 a.m.

Cheap way to cut channels in concrete is to get a masonry blade for a regular circular saw. Messy and slower than the big boy, but will do the job. Run paralell cuts as far apart as needed, then the BFH and a chisel to knock out the middle. Your saw will probably be shot when you finish. I always would use my crappiest saw, then did not worry about it. Eye protection is vital, and the concrete dust will get everywhere. Probably a good idea to get a big fan to blow it outside.

ignorant
ignorant SuperDork
3/22/09 8:22 a.m.

I am jealous. Very very jealous.

Woody
Woody Dork
3/22/09 8:39 a.m.
cwh wrote: Cheap way to cut channels in concrete is to get a masonry blade for a regular circular saw. Messy and slower than the big boy, but will do the job. Run paralell cuts as far apart as needed, then the BFH and a chisel to knock out the middle. Your saw will probably be shot when you finish. I always would use my crappiest saw, then did not worry about it. Eye protection is vital, and the concrete dust will get everywhere. Probably a good idea to get a big fan to blow it outside.

Cut a minimum of three grooves to minimize the possibility that the broken chunks will get wedged in there when you try to remove them.

Been there.

cwh
cwh Dork
3/22/09 9:53 a.m.

I bet if we all got together that sucker would be mounted and lifting in one hour and a 12 pack!

sachilles
sachilles Reader
3/22/09 11:26 a.m.

I thought that was just a scissor style lift....I was wondering why it had to be hard mounted. Then I looked at the picture link. That is a pretty cool setup.

BAMF
BAMF New Reader
3/22/09 12:25 p.m.
RussellH wrote: I'm getting ready to install my bendpak P6 lift that's been sitting in the garage for almost a year now. Can I drill in the concrete without a hammer-drill? do I need a special drill-bit or the multi-purpose B&D drills will work? I'd hate to have to buy a hammer drill for 6 holes.

You have a lift, but not a hammer drill (or access to one)? You'll need a masonry bit that's made for concrete, and made of carbide. Once you've got all that it's simple stuff. Renting a hammer drill for a few hours isn't too expensive.

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