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AnthonyGS (Forum Supporter)
AnthonyGS (Forum Supporter) UberDork
2/2/23 10:55 p.m.
Pete Gossett (Forum Supporter) said:

In reply to AnthonyGS (Forum Supporter) :

My condolences. Between the traffic over the bridge & their high crime rate I'd almost rather deal with the crime. At least I'd be able to vent my frustration.

I'm staying by the airport (hotel has a full fence) and driving to the plant up north a bit.  It's not the worst thing, but yes there are parts of town that should be avoided for sure.  The easiest way to keep from being a victim of crime is not be there.  This also lends to my saying that the most dangerous thing to people are... other people, sadly.  The rail district here is largely industrial away from most of the city.  It does appear that KCS and CN have yards in town too.  I can't imagine what that attracts.  The majority of the rail traffic is north of town near refineries and other heavy business.  I'm heading back to my house tomorrow after lunch and will be home for dinner. 

aircooled
aircooled MegaDork
2/3/23 12:28 a.m.

Nick, can you tell me anything about this engine?  I read it's a Lima? What was it likely used for?

I am pretty sure this was the engine that used to be in a park (in Alameda CA) when I was a kid but appears to have been moved.  It's a lot older than I would have thought.  I remember it a huge, but it appears to be rather small.

NickD
NickD MegaDork
2/3/23 8:51 a.m.
aircooled said:

Nick, can you tell me anything about this engine?  I read it's a Lima? What was it likely used for?

I am pretty sure this was the engine that used to be in a park (in Alameda CA) when I was a kid but appears to have been moved.  It's a lot older than I would have thought.  I remember it a huge, but it appears to be rather small.

It was a class S-11 0-6-0 switch engine, used for moving cars around in yards and assembling trains for road power to handle. Retired sometime in the early '50s and donated to Alameda in 1958. Then in 1997, it was donated by Alameda to the Golden Gate Railroad Museum in Richmond, CA. Then in 2008 it was bought by the Sierra Northern Railway and moved to the California Western's shops in Oakdale, CA for an operational restoration. It fell off the radar since then and the only photo I can find shows it disassembled and looking pretty forlorn. The cab is off, boiler jacketing is off, oil bunker is off of the tender.

NickD
NickD MegaDork
2/3/23 9:08 a.m.
NickD said:
NickD said:

I saw a flyer on Facebook for this RDC charter trip on the Reading & Northern with rare mileage, photo runbys, and a visit to see CNJ #113. I'm strongly considering purchasing a ticket for this. Originally they were also advertising going to Good Springs but R&N said they didn't feel comfortable enough with the track condition to take passengers there. 

 

Well, I sent my check in the mail for this yesterday. I'll drive down Friday, and my hope is to go to either the Colebrookdale Railroad or the Allentown & Auburn on Friday, ride this excursion Saturday, and then head over to Strasburg and spend the day photographing there before heading home.

Hmmm, well if East Broad Top has gotten the #16 running and if they are operating regular steam-powered excursions by then, maybe instead of heading west to Strasburg on Sunday, I'll head further south to Orbisonia and finally get to see the East Broad Top in action.

I was getting nervous for a bit about this trip, because I mailed the check three weeks ago, and the money hadn't been withdrawn from my account. I was afraid it was going to one of those "Damned if you do, damned if you don't" situations, where if I sent them another check, they'd get the first one and I'd get billed for two tickets, and if I waited to see if they got it, they wouldn't and then the trip would be sold out by then. Oh, and it says you can use the form on the website, but when you go to the page, it has at the top of the page Do Not Use This Page. Huh, that's helpful.

Which brings up a gripe I have: It's the year 2023, stop having mailed checks be the only way to buy tickets/donate money. Arcade & Attica is always asking for donations to restore #18, but the only way to donate is to mail them a check. Well, no wonder it's taking forever to fundraise. It's not that hard to set up a website for donations, and I guarantee it would probably raise money faster.

NickD
NickD MegaDork
2/3/23 12:20 p.m.

East Broad Top's eventual plan is to have all six of the Mikados operational. The #16 was chosen first because it was found to be in the best condition and because it had the hook of being one of the engines that has never operated in the post-1960 tourist iteration of the East Broad Top.

The #14 and #15, which were the "small" saturated-steam Mikados are next up. From what I've read in one spot, while #14 was planned to be the next and is currently disassembled and under repair, the #15 may actually beat it back to service, even though disassembly hasn't started yet. Part of that is because the #14 had issues with extensive cracking in the drive wheels that was found in the early 2000s. The #14 was taken out of service and McHugh Locomotive and Equipment performed extensive welding on the left rear driver, which was the worst, in May and June 2005. Unfortunately M-7, which was pulling trains for the start of the 2005 season failed, and #14 was put back into service before the welding repairs were completed. The #14 was officially returned to operation July 2, 2005 and the repairs were never completed, causing the cracks to return. The EBT is now having to have 8 new drive wheel centers cast for the #14.

Of the "big" Mikados, the #17 will likely beat the #18 back to service. The #17 hauled the final freight train on the EBT and was run from 1968 to 2002 and was apparently a pretty good running engine, it was just that they rarely needed the extra power of the larger engine, the superheaters and piston valves added extra maintenance costs, and the roadbed wasn't in the best shape and the #17 tended to be hard on the road bed. In later years, it did develop a lot of rod noise though and some suspect her wheels have lost their round. The #18 has never run since the railroad, as a common-carrier, closed down in 1956 and was supposed to haul the final freight trains on the EBT. It suffered some sort of mechanical failure, that led to the #17 being used instead, and while it was looked at for restoration when the East Broad Top was bought by the East Broad Top Foundation in 2020, the #18 was run hard with limited maintenance near the end of common carrier operations, and there are some welding repairs performed on the firebox that are undocumented.

The one that is most likely to be returned to operation last is the #12, officially named Millie after Nick Kovalchick's daughter. The #12 was the first Mikado purchased by East Broad Top in 1911, and is smaller than the #14 and #15. It pulled the first trains of the tourist-era East Broad Top in 1960 and was run until 2001 but due to it's smaller size and lower pulling power, the #12 was usually reserve power or used on off-peak days. By the 1990s it was pretty badly used up and only made appearances at special events and was parked in 2001. While it was evaluated for a return to service, it was discovered that it needs pretty much everything, right down to the tires, which are worn past legal limits. The other issue that the #12 has is that while the #14 and #15 can share parts, and the #16 and #17 and #18 are all the same design, the #12 is a unique design.

NickD
NickD MegaDork
2/3/23 4:41 p.m.
NickD
NickD MegaDork
2/6/23 11:25 a.m.

This weekend, Cass Scenic Railroad ran the official state locomotive of West Virginia, 118 year old Shay #5, over the new bridge over Trout Run. There has not been a train from Cass to Durbin since the Western Maryland abandoned the former C&O Greenbrier Division in 1983, and it hasn't been even feasible since 1985. In '85, a severe flood wiped out quite a bit of the right of way and washed away the approaches to the bridge. Since 2010, 7 miles of the line have been restored from Cass north to the south end of the Trout Run bridge and from the north end of the Trout Run bridge to Housterman, the right of way was raised several feet and curves have been expanded to give the rebuilt segments  more distance between the right-of-way and the river, and a new bridge was also installed 20 feet upriver of the old bridge.

With their now being a rail connection between Cass and Durbin, the Durbin & Greenbriar Valley will be able to provide excursions between the two communities. Discussions are ongoing regarding the rebuilding of the former WM line between Durbin and Cheat Junction which would provide the potential for lengthy excursions from Elkins to Cass. For those trips, they would likely need a rod engine, since geared locomotives are awfully slow. They have one of the Buffalo Creek & Gauley 2-8-0s that they are restoring for that service though.

NickD
NickD MegaDork
2/6/23 12:05 p.m.

Photos showing the issue with the old bridge. The bridge itself was fine, but the approach washed away on the one end. "Seems like it would be easier just to fill the approach and put some sort of retaining wall in", you say. You would be right, except for those pesky environmental agencies. There were environmental concerns with bringing in new fill. Up to that point, all the reconstruction involved dragging the washed out grade back up out of the river to re-create the roadbed. The environmental folks did not want the D&GVR to bring down rock and dirt from above the RR to make the grade, but could move material back up from below. There was no more fill left below, because it had all washed away in the flood, so it was just easier to completely relocate the bridge. Yeah, it doesn't make much sense to me either. Adding to the difficulty, due to the remoteness of the construction site, all crews, equipment and had to moved by rail from access points at Cass, Durbin and Hosterman. 
 

NickD
NickD MegaDork
2/6/23 12:09 p.m.

NickD
NickD MegaDork
2/6/23 12:10 p.m.
AnthonyGS (Forum Supporter)
AnthonyGS (Forum Supporter) UberDork
2/6/23 10:45 p.m.

Nick what do you know about the Texas and Pacific?  Do you have sources that I am not aware of from my internet searches.  And what do you know about the T&NO / SP in East TX?  I have some sources, but T&P info especially seems hard to come by. 

NickD
NickD MegaDork
2/7/23 3:16 p.m.

In reply to AnthonyGS (Forum Supporter) :

The Texas Pacific Railroad Company was formed in 1871 as part of the post-Civil War "railroad fever" and was supposed to provide a southern transcontinental line, from Marshall, TX to San Diego, CA. It was originally planned to be constructed as a very unusual 42" gauge railroad, until the state of Texas stepped in and mandated that it be constructed to standard gauge. Construction within the state of Texas was fairly rapid (250 miles in ten months), partially due to the purchase of the Southern Pacific Railroad Company (a different SP, since at the time what we now know as Southern Pacific was still the Central Pacific) and the Southern Transcontinental Railroad Company in 1872 and the Memphis, El Paso & Pacific Railroad Company in 1873. Tom Scott, formerly of the Pennsylvania Railroad became president in 1872, and the name was changed via an act of Congress to the Texas & Pacific Railway. 

The first rail line was opened between Longview and Dallas in July of 1873, and in December that year, the line from Marshall to Texarkana was placed in service. But westward expansion stalled out and the railroad encountered financial difficulties in during the Panic of 1873, which would result in the T&P going into receivership in 1875.

One of its last projects was the 1874 Trinity River bridge in Dallas to handle the massive livestock traffic originating on the many ranches to the west. Nearby Fort Worth, a big livestock marketing center, became increasingly dissatisfied with the lack of a T&P connection. Frustrated with the cash-strapped railroad, farmers and stockmen organized and graded the 30-mile stretch between the two cities and laid down ties, allowing the first T&P train to enter in July 1876. It is ironic that Fort Worth, which had to pay to get into the T&P family, eventually became the operating hub for the system.  It grew rapidly as a transportation enterprise owing to its strategic importance in northeast Texas and its connections through Texarkana and Shreveport to major cities such as St. Louis, New Orleans, and Atlanta.

Jay Gould stepped in in 1879 to get the T&P back on it's feet, and the Texas & Pacific made it only as far west as Sierra Blanca, TX, where it met up with the Galveston, Harrison & San Antonio Railroad, which was a subsidiary of the Southern Pacific. This connection with the SP in 1881 did construct a southern transcontinental, just not under one roof as planned originally. Afterwards, the T&P turned eastward and completed its own line from Waskom to Shreveport and, of more importance, pushed on to New Orleans by acquiring short railroads and constructing connecting segments. Other than building and acquiring several feeder lines, the New Orleans-Dallas-El Paso route represented the geographic limits of the T&P, although the Marshall-Texarkana stretch was probably the busiest segment since it was used by both east-west and north-south traffic from connecting MP lines. The year 1881 also saw the opening of the line to Abilene, Texas. One of Gould’s first moves, in 1881, was also to build a line north from Fort Worth to Sherman, giving T&P a second route to Texarkana as well as a direct connection at Denison, Texas, with the recently completed Missouri, Kansas & Texas, which Gould had acquired in 1880.

As part of Jay Gould's involvement with the T&P, he leased the T&P to the Missouri Pacific, which he had control of. The lease only ended for four years, but the Texas & Pacific would keep friendly relations with Missouri Pacific through the entirety of its existence. In fact, in 1928, the Missouri Pacific would end up in control of the T&P again when they ended up purchasing the majority stock in the T&P. The T&P continued to operate under an independent identity, but you could certainly see that as time went on, their appearances started to gravitate towards the Missouri Pacific's, particularly in the diesel era.

The later T&P steam power tended to have a very distinctive T&P look: flared smoke stack, big Elesco feedwater heater, twin air pumps on the front deck with angled sheetmetal covers, and the big red diamond T&P logo over the smokebox. Like parent company Missouri Pacific, they ignored the invention of the articulated steam locomotive. They stuck mostly to some tea-kettle Ten-Wheelers, Mikados, Pacifics and Mountains. But in 1925, they became the first railroad to purchase a large order of the 2-10-4 wheel arrangement (ATSF had had the first, #3829, six years earlier but it was a one-of-one and ATSF had let the wheel arrangement lapse into obscurity) and so it was determined that a 2-10-4 was a Texas-type (except on the CB&Q, where they called it a Colorado-type)

Being a Texas-based railroad, the Texas & Pacific's traffic was obviously based heavily on livestock and oil, although Louisiana also did a bustling business in gravel in the 1950s and 1960s as well. During WWII, the Texas & Pacific, like the Missouri Pacific and the Frisco, basically functioned as a rolling pipeline, endless strings of black oil tankers headed to ports and military bases. The T&P was, on paper, somewhat of an also ran in the passenger industry but did have several named trains that had healthy reputations. These included the joint MP-T&P Texas Eagle from St. Louis to Galveston/El Paso/San Antonio/Mexico City with an SP connection to San Diego and the New Orleans-Fort Worth Louisiana Eagle.

Immediately after WWII, much like the parent MP, the T&P began aggressively dieselizing, with EMD switchers in '46, EMD E7s in '47 and EMD F7s in '49. By 1953, the curtain had closed on Texas & Pacific steam. One 4-6-0, two 2-10-4s, two 4-6-2s and a single 2-8-2 escaped the immediate scrapping, only for one 2-10-4, #638, to be scrapped by the city of Dallas after vandalism, and the Pacifics and Mikes were scrapped in the '60s after the dissolution of Paulsen Spence's Louisiana Eastern. T&P diesels came in two separate liveries: the passenger power and cab units used Missouri Pacific's silver, cream and medium blue (so that their jointly operated passenger trains looked better) and a yellow and black for freight road switchers.


There was an amusing blip in the return of steam power on the Texas & Pacific in 1957 and 1958. When flooding from the Red River west of Alexandria, Louisiana, covered Texas & Pacific’s main line in 1957, the dieselized T&P borrowed a 2-8-2 from Fort Worth & Denver to drag trains through the water that would damage traction motors on diesel-electrics. To guard against a repeat, T&P in January 1958 bought a different FW&D Mikado and gave it the number 400, and it did end up seeing service in 1958. Today, that locomotive is preserved at the old T&P depot in Marshall Texas.

In 1956, the T&P, as a separate entity, began living on borrowed time. MP began systematic purchases of T&P stock with a goal of 80 percent ownership that would allow consolidated tax returns for the two companies. Ironically, one of the last large blocks of stock included 12,000 shares from the estate of Frank Gould, grandson of Jay Gould. By 1957, MP owned 77 percent of T&P and there was talk of merger but, on public perception grounds, it was not pursued. Still, the identities began to blur further, with later T&P GP18s wearing the Missouri Pacific livery and lettered for Texas Pacific Lines. In 1976, the semi-independent status of T&P was finally brought to an end after a 30-year legal battle for recapitalization of the MP system’s holding company. In the end, the new Missouri Pacific Corp. absorbed its three major railroads, MP, T&P, and Chicago & Eastern Illinois.

In a slice of irony, the Fort Worth-Sierra Blanca line that represented so much of Jay Gould’s dreams in the 1880s became a key segment in one of the nation’s premier transcontinental routes in 1996 when Union Pacific, after swallowing up Missouri Pacific and Western Pacific in 1982, also acquired Southern Pacific. The ex-T&P line between Texarkana and El Paso is an extremely attractive route, as it is almost 250 miles shorter than the competing line using Cotton Belt and Sunset Route lines, thus providing some final vindication for the ghost of Gould over his one-time nemesis, C. P. Huntington.

I saw a news report the other day that Amtrak was going to make some test runs along the NO&M sub this week, despite not having a date set yet for when service will start.  This afternoon I heard a horn & didn't recognize & ran outside to see if I could catch it. I didn't have time for a pick but 2 Amtrak units were shoving 4 cars westward. About 15-minutes ago I heard them come back through eastbound. 

Now I'm wondering if Amtrack is planning on shoving trains one direction during revenue service too? It would surprise me considering it's almost 140 miles. 

NickD
NickD MegaDork
2/7/23 6:56 p.m.

In reply to Pete Gossett (Forum Supporter) :

Probably not. They might use a "cabbage car" though and run in push-pull mode. Cabbage cars are F40PHs that they gutted the engines out of to make into a baggage area and can be used as a control cab on the other end. 

Handy when you don't have a wye or other facilities to make a turn and are going to be ping-ponging back and forth. You pull one direction with the power, then the crew goes back and controls the train from the cabbage car and the power shoves it back.

NickD
NickD MegaDork
2/8/23 10:33 a.m.

The Texas & Pacific's massive station and company headquarters still exists in Fort Worth

Along with the similar but even larger freight warehouse, just one block to the west

NickD
NickD MegaDork
2/8/23 12:50 p.m.

There was also Texas & Pacific 2-10-4 #610, which was revived for the 1976 American Freedom Train, and then leased out to the Southern Railway in 1977. Southern Railway didn't have anything with enough power to meet the demand for their trains, and the #610 was all dressed up with nowhere to run, so it was a great deal. The #610 proved to have all the horsepower that Southern needed. I have an old railfan magazine from 1978 and they talk about how on one of the first trips, run over Southern's "Rathole Division" (subsidiary Cincinatti, New Orleans & Texas Pacific) there was a grade that the #4501 required diesel assistance with 12 cars. The #610 was sent up it with 16 passenger cars, and Bill Purdie ordered the diesel assistance to follow at a distance and only help if he called them. The #610 marched right up the hill, and when the diesel crew radioed to see if they were needed, Bill Purdie responded with "We still had a few notches left on the throttle too." The #610's time on the Southern came to an end in 1981 though. With just 63" drivers, the #610 couldn't keep up with the speeds that were demanded without beating the daylights out of the crews and the roadbed. The high-speed running also beat the daylights out of the running gear and the #610 was going to be due for a major running gear overhaul. Southern had already decided to overhaul C&O #2716, since it was the best balance of power and speed, and the impending merger with Norfolk & Western was going to add N&W #611 to the roster, and so the decision was made to send #610 back to the Lone Star State. With the sheer weight and long rigid wheelbase, the #610 was too big to run on any tourist lines and so it was returned to a display piece. Today it spends most of it's days tucked in the Texas State Railroad's Palestine shops, only being brought out for the occasional display. Someone supposedly asked TSRR if they would ever consider restoring the #610 to operation and they just got horrified looks from the TSRR employees. On one occasion they tried to turn it on the TSRR's wye, and it rolled a rail over and went on the ground, and that pretty much murdered any hopes of it ever running there.

 

NickD
NickD MegaDork
2/8/23 2:32 p.m.

T&P #610 had been donated to the city of Fort Worth after it's retirement in 1951 and was on display at the Will Rogers Memorial Center until 1968. By that point the locomotive's condition had started to deteriorate and the city wanted it gone. It was sold to a gentleman named David Pearson (not that David Pearson) for the princely sum of $1 and moved onto a siding. When the Amercian Freedom Train was being planned, Ross Rowland had originally wanted to use doubleheaded Nickel Plate Road Berkshires, since he had used NKP #759 less than a decade earlier for his Golden Spike Limited and found them to be the right combination of power, speed, and size. Rowland had actually had #763 and #755 moved to New Jersey (he had returned the #759 to Steamtown USA in '71 amidst deteriorating relations) for mechanical evaluation. The AFT planning committee got involved though, and was looking at a bunch of other steam locomotives, including N&W #611 with the streamlining removed. They settled on SP #4449, which was rotting away at a park in Portland, Oregon.

Then Texas began lobbying that they wanted to have a Texan locomotive hauling the train while it was passing through the Lone Star State and put forth the idea to restore the #610 for the duty. The AFT committee agreed, and according to AFT committee head, photographer and author Don Ball Jr. he really made the decision for personal reasons: in his railfanning years he had never been able to get down to Texas to see the 600s when they were in operation and this was an opportunity to make up for that. The (in)famous Dick Jensen travelled down from Chicago to spearhead the effort to get the #610 up and running again. Jensen was a mechanical savant, he had restored GTW #4070 and GTW #5629 to operation, had been restoring CB&Q #5632 before it was illegally scrapped, and was involved in keeping several other steam locomotives running. Unfortunately, Jensen wasn't always the most rooted in reality, and the project got behind schedule, which was unacceptable since there was less than a year until the AFT. Jensen was kicked off the project and David Pearson took charge. The #610 was finished up at the eleventh hour and made several test runs, with Don Ball Jr. saying that seeing the #610 operate was one of the proudest moments of his career. The #610 took over from SP #4449 when it reached the western border of Texas, hauled the train throughout the state, and then handed things back over to SP #4449 at the eastern border, as well as posing for photos with SP #4449, Southern #722 and Southern #4501.

When it comes to locomotives that I wish I could have seen operate, the #610 is tops. The amount of US-built 10-coupled locomotives that have operated in the US in the preservation era can be counted on one hand: Frisco 2-10-0 #1630, Great Western of Colorado 2-10-0 #90 and Texas & Pacific 2-10-4 #610. And the #610 had presence, with that curious Lima articulated trailing truck, massive counterweights and connecting rods, big Elesco feedwater heater hung out over the firebox, and air pumps on the front deck.

AnthonyGS (Forum Supporter)
AnthonyGS (Forum Supporter) UberDork
2/8/23 6:09 p.m.

Thank you so much!  That was a fascinating read and great photos!  Interestingly enough, I'm shocked you knew about the connection to the MKT in Denison.  There is also an interchange with the KO&G and Southern Pacific there.  Denison is where most rail traffic entered TX originally.  Odd thing about Denison, it was home to the only tunnel on the T&P.  The MKT mainline crossed over the T&P there.  I guess they didn't want to build a direct rail crossing.  The tunnel is long gone.  None of that trackage exists today but I know the layout from the old fire insurance maps at the Univ of TX.  I really like the scheme of the T&P GP units. I need to try my hand at modeling one.  I have a shelf layout under construction of the T&P at Denison using concepts from Lance Mindheim.
 

Our family has ridden the TSRR as well.   

NickD
NickD MegaDork
2/9/23 12:23 p.m.

Texas State Railroad also has the other surviving T&P steam locomotive, and used to operate it, Texas & Pacific 4-6-0 #316 (as Texas State 201). Sadly it, as well as ATSF #1316, got wrapped up in the whole new boiler debacle that knocked the two steam locomotives out of service. It was determined that the boilers on both locomotives were in need of repair, and the state offered them a grant to replace with a new construction boiler from a company in Texas. Unfortunately, the company that built the new boilers only built boilers for industrial applications and had no experience with steam locomotive boilers. The #316's boiler arrived first and it was installed and the #316 was put back in service. Within 400 days, it was knocked out of service with severe cracking issues with the boiler. The boiler shell and the firebox sheets were way too thick and so they didn't flex as need, but just cracked. The firebox also didn't transfer heat properly, and so it didn't cool right, and the inner surfaces were starting to melt. Before they caught that, they had already removed the old boiler off of the #1316 to begin the installation of it's new boiler. They checked the new boiler for the #1316 and found it was even further out of spec than the #316's. Between the sheer weight of the new boiler and the fact that the #1316's frame had several old cracks that had been repaired, they didn't even try to install and use that boiler. The railroad came up with the idea of scrapping the new boilers and the old flues out of the original boilers and using the money to fund repairs on the existing boilers, and then the scrap company made off with the money. The two locomotives have since had their old worn-out boilers put back on and have been placed as static displays.

NickD
NickD MegaDork
2/9/23 12:24 p.m.

NickD
NickD MegaDork
2/9/23 12:41 p.m.

Santa Fe's Texas Chief waits at Houston behind Alco PAs, while a Texas & Pacific F-unit backs down towards it's train.

Pete Gossett (Forum Supporter)
Pete Gossett (Forum Supporter) GRM+ Memberand MegaDork
2/9/23 12:55 p.m.

I just caught Amtrak heading through town on another test/training run. 
 

 

NickD
NickD MegaDork
2/9/23 1:58 p.m.

In reply to Pete Gossett (Forum Supporter) :

I'm surprised that they're tying up two Siemens Chargers for that. Granted, they're probably better off down than there than up in the PNW. They're still having all sorts of issues with them in the cold and snow on the Empire Builder.

In reply to NickD :

No doubt. It's a bit overkill having 3 locomotives for 1 car too. 

NickD
NickD MegaDork
2/9/23 2:23 p.m.

In March 1960, the T&P received its first low nose units: GP18s #1145-#1149, but they were quickly renumbered #500-#504 in a general renumbering. The MoPac "Jenks blue" was introduced and began being applied to T&P units in June 1961 , so this T&P blue and gray scheme was very short lived.

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