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Maroon92
Maroon92 MegaDork
3/4/13 7:30 p.m.

With my lengthy commute, I've been blazing through my credits on Audible. That said, I'm overwhelmed by the choices, and can't choose my next book. Someone make a recommendation of a good book.

In general, I like non-fiction, but I think I'm looking for fiction this time. Whatever the genre, I'm not really picky. So, let's get started, state your case for your recommended book.

Sput
Sput Reader
3/4/13 7:35 p.m.

"The Art of Racing in the Rain" by Garth Stein

Maroon92
Maroon92 MegaDork
3/4/13 7:38 p.m.

Read it years ago. I finished reading it approximately 20 minutes after Garth finished writing it...

MA$$hole
MA$$hole HalfDork
3/4/13 7:43 p.m.

Kane Hodder - Unmasked. I thoroughly enjoyed it.

Mmadness
Mmadness New Reader
3/4/13 7:45 p.m.

In reply to Sput: Yeah, that is a very good book. Driving like Crazy by P.J. O'Rouke was funny but not in a very informative (or factual way). Of all of them, I really liked Bob Lutz's Car Guys vs. Bean Counters. Let me share an excerpt:

“There’s an old, presumably apocryphal tale about body integrity, good body sealing, and absence of unsightly gaps around the hood, trunk, and doors. It goes like this: To test for the car’s airtightness, Toyota engineers would leave a cat in the car in the evening. The next morning, if the cat was active and chipper, there was obviously too much air entering the car somewhere. But if the cat was limp, listless, or near dead, this indicated a tightly built car. Hearing of this cat test, a GM assembly plant also placed a feline in the just-assembled car, shut all the vents and doors, and awaited the morning. But, when the engineers came back to check the next day, the cat was gone!”

ultraclyde
ultraclyde GRM+ Memberand Dork
3/4/13 7:58 p.m.

Good Sci Fi - Old Man's War trilogy by John Scalzi. I really enjoy his perspectives.

American Gods by Neil Gaimon - not exactly fantasy, but not exactly mainline fiction either. One of my favorite books right now.

Anything by Pat Conroy or James Lee Burke if you like good moody southern fiction.

If you like mental bubbegum adventure stories, there's always Clive Cussler. Avoid the co-written stuff, but the new protagonist that's a turn-of-the-century railroad detective is very readable.

If you read Christopher Moore's 'Lamb' you may go to hell, but you'll laugh all the way there. His other works that I've read are good, but not AS good.

SnowMongoose
SnowMongoose Reader
3/4/13 8:16 p.m.

Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson

“Like every other creature on the face of the earth, Godfrey was, by birthright, a stupendous badass, albeit in the somewhat narrow technical sense that he could trace his ancestry back up a long line of slightly less highly evolved stupendous badasses to that first self-replicating gizmo---which, given the number and variety of its descendants, might justifiably be described as the most stupendous badass of all time. Everyone and everything that wasn't a stupendous badass was dead.”

Enyar
Enyar Reader
3/4/13 8:29 p.m.

Let my people go surfing - Yvon Chounard.I'm reading it now. Interesting business/lifestyle philosophy from founder/owner of Patagonia.

Duke
Duke PowerDork
3/4/13 9:13 p.m.

My wife just finished a semi-sf book called Wool ; I forget the author. She said it was excellent.

I'm currently reading a book called How Music Works by David Byrne of Talking Heads fame. It's pretty interesting nonfiction. However, I doubt it is available as an audiobook.

I'll second Gaiman's American Gods - a very good read... err, listen.

mtn
mtn PowerDork
3/4/13 9:23 p.m.

Lonesome Dove by Larry McMurtry. Over 800 pages in print, so it should be good for quite a few days.

JoeyM
JoeyM UltimaDork
3/4/13 10:12 p.m.
SnowMongoose wrote: Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson “Like every other creature on the face of the earth, Godfrey was, by birthright, a stupendous badass, albeit in the somewhat narrow technical sense that he could trace his ancestry back up a long line of slightly less highly evolved stupendous badasses to that first self-replicating gizmo---which, given the number and variety of its descendants, might justifiably be described as the most stupendous badass of all time. Everyone and everything that wasn't a stupendous badass was dead.”

SnowCrash by Stephenson
Zodiac by Stephenson
The Difference Engine by Stephenson and Gibson
Neuromancer by Gibson
Startide Rising by David Brin
Small Gods by pratchet
Otherness by David Brin.

ransom
ransom GRM+ Memberand UltraDork
3/4/13 11:07 p.m.

Hold Me Closer, Necromancer by Lish McBride

A Dirty Job by Christopher Moore (I like several other of his, but this is the one that started me off)

Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman

In nonfiction, I've been enjoying the hell out of Kevin Cameron's Top Dead Center. Great collection of essays and columns about motorcycle roadracing, with great anecdotes about technical details to the thought processes of riders and tuners.

fritzsch
fritzsch HalfDork
3/5/13 3:36 a.m.

Im going to disregard the fiction bit because the recent books Ive read have been nonfiction.

Flyboys - About fighter pilots who were shot over Chichi Jima and captured by Japanese troops

Climbing Mount Improbable - Science book, but not textbook technical or anything, in which the author uses probability to help explain evolution and the mechanisms of natural selection, very interesting

The Disappearing Spoon - Stories about the elements of the periodic table. How they were discovered and stories behind them. Pretty cool stuff as well.

wheelsmithy
wheelsmithy GRM+ Memberand Reader
3/5/13 5:40 a.m.

The ROAD, and NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN-movies too, but GREAT reads.

Rufledt
Rufledt Dork
3/5/13 7:04 a.m.

I don't remember the name, but it had a gun on the cover. That's right, I judged the book by it's cover and it ended up being awesome.

ryejeff
ryejeff New Reader
3/5/13 7:09 a.m.

Night Soldiers by Alan Furst. First of a series of historical fiction novels focused on espionage around the beginning of WWII. So far, I have read the first two. They are interesting because the "heros" of the novel really feel like ordinary people living in a dark time.

Woody
Woody GRM+ Memberand MegaDork
3/5/13 7:11 a.m.

UltraMarathonMan by Dean Karnazes.

poopshovel
poopshovel UltimaDork
3/5/13 7:13 a.m.

We listened to "Full Dark - No Stars" (Stephen King) on vacation.

The first short story was the best of his I've ever (heard?)

JohnInKansas
JohnInKansas Dork
3/5/13 7:22 a.m.

The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo trilogy by Stieg Larson.

RossD
RossD UberDork
3/5/13 7:25 a.m.

I want to read that pilot's book about flying the SR-71 Blackbird. Just haven't got around to it yet...

Curmudgeon
Curmudgeon MegaDork
3/5/13 7:26 a.m.

'Full Dark, No Stars' is a GREAT book. It's King returning to his roots.

4cylndrfury
4cylndrfury MegaDork
3/5/13 7:34 a.m.

The James Bond books are actually quite good.

I used to be a big Dean Koontz fan, but his more recent stuff seems to be so-so for me.

poopshovel
poopshovel UltimaDork
3/5/13 8:09 a.m.
Curmudgeon wrote: 'Full Dark, No Stars' is a GREAT book. It's King returning to his roots.

"I believe that there is another man inside of every man, a stranger, a Conniving Man.”

914Driver
914Driver GRM+ Memberand MegaDork
3/5/13 8:17 a.m.

Hanta Yo by Ruth Beebe Hill. Follows Indian (native American) families for a few generations. Interesting, think cowboys & indians from the indian's point of view.

bludroptop
bludroptop SuperDork
3/5/13 8:24 a.m.

Currently reading The Grand Design by Stephen Hawking. I recommend it if you are at all interested in theoretical physics, quantum mechanics and that sort of thing. The writing is very down-to-earth, even of the concepts aren't.

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