Rob_Mopar
Rob_Mopar UltraDork
1/6/17 7:30 p.m.

I just saw that Pete Chapouris passed away. Damn.

Woody
Woody GRM+ Memberand MegaDork
1/6/17 7:47 p.m.

He was one seriously talented individual. I've always heard that he was a really nice guy too. Very sad...

AngryCorvair
AngryCorvair GRM+ Memberand UltimaDork
1/6/17 7:49 p.m.

Gary
Gary Dork
1/6/17 7:56 p.m.

Yes, damn. Great talent. We will miss him.

Gary
Gary Dork
1/6/17 8:01 p.m.

This just got me to thinking ... how soon will it be before all the influential movers and shakers of this generation are gone? Most of them are already gone. What's next? I don't see anything replacing the masters. If anybody disagrees, let's hear it.

Robbie
Robbie GRM+ Memberand UltraDork
1/6/17 8:34 p.m.
Gary wrote: This just got me to thinking ... how soon will it be before all the influential movers and shakers of this generation are gone? Most of them are already gone. What's next? I don't see anything replacing the masters. If anybody disagrees, let's hear it.

No one will ever replace the "masters" you are speaking of because communication is becoming better and better, allowing individualism on a much larger scale than before. Therefore, no one will ever achieve the same popularity as someone like Elvis, simply because there is now more legitimate choice.

For Elvis on the radio, that was your only choice. If you didn't love Elvis, you could listen to nothing. If you didn't like radio, you could listen to nothing. Elvis or no music. Now, you can literally listen to millions of different artists on probably thousands of different delivery formats, so therefore no single artist or format will ever be able to capture everyone's attention simultaneously again.

That said - everyone gets to listen to what they actually want - which is much better for folks who only kinda like Elvis. (and all the artists who were just not quite as mainstream as Elvis)

Gary
Gary Dork
1/6/17 8:44 p.m.

In response to Robbie:

I was referring to cars, and so-called "expressionism" regarding customizing vehicles. You seem to be proffering an argument for a topic that no argument is really necessary. Beyond that, I won't venture anything in regard to your post. On the other hand, if you want to discuss music, then you might want to go over to the "what are you listening to now" thread.

Robbie
Robbie GRM+ Memberand UltraDork
1/6/17 9:13 p.m.

In reply to Gary:

The point is the same regardless of artistic venue (music, cars, movies, you name it). 50 years ago, there were not nearly as many delivery channels for custom car parts or even photos of customized cars. Now that choice is prolific, we will never see the same mass focus on so few people. Its because we all prefer to make slightly different choices, and therefore if given the opportunity to differentiate, humans sure seem to do so.

you did ask for opinions. Sorry that my example wasn't clear.

Gary
Gary Dork
1/6/17 9:15 p.m.

Still not clear. I'm talking about concept and design in regard to "custom" vehicle design. I don't see anybody coming forward to be a leader in this field. In that regard, I don't understand your alternative argument. Are you suggesting any specific individual in this field?

stuart in mn
stuart in mn UltimaDork
1/6/17 9:45 p.m.

Sad to hear. I went over to the HAMB board looking for more information, he had a stroke.

Huckleberry
Huckleberry MegaDork
1/6/17 10:34 p.m.

I think I agree with Robbie. There are so many avenues for builders and designers to put out their craft now it's impossible for handful of people to get a choke hold on a media outlet long enough to become a "giant".

Like Elvis, the gentleman who passed was something of an acquired taste we all had to eat more of than we wanted. He was talented, and got some traction when he had maybe 3 real competitors for a cover. So they gave him more covers. Like getting yourself on the best seller list... A, little exposure breeds more.

Now, there are 20k websites featuring all kinds of talented people making vehicles. I don't have to take a dump to a handful of periodicals forcing their favorites upon me. The good news is that I'm not forced into reading mags featuring terrible, flamed 30s hot rods to get my fix anymore. The bad news is the people making beautiful things that I can replace that with are never going to rise above the crowd.

Good for watchers, bad for doers. But, artists were never in it for the money, right?

johnnie
johnnie Reader
1/7/17 9:05 a.m.

His Hildebrand wheels on smoothed-out Ford thing has been in the public consciousness so long it's hard to believe it was innovative.

Cousin_Eddie
Cousin_Eddie New Reader
1/7/17 9:31 a.m.

It's Halibrand.

Appleseed
Appleseed MegaDork
1/7/17 11:06 a.m.

I'd say Chip Foose, Troy Trepanier, Scott Sullivan, and Steve Strope come to mind. Begrudgingly, Boyd Coddington, too.

spitfirebill
spitfirebill UltimaDork
1/7/17 11:53 a.m.

Damn. He was a likable guy. Sorry to hear it.

Duke
Duke MegaDork
1/7/17 12:08 p.m.
Gary wrote: Still not clear. I'm talking about concept and design in regard to "custom" vehicle design. I don't see anybody coming forward to be a leader in this field. In that regard, I don't understand your alternative argument. Are you suggesting any specific individual in this field?

You're missing Robbie's point. You seem to be ascribing the perceived decline or scarcity of iconic "masters" to some lack of creative vision or talent or dedication among the newer generations.

Robbie's counterpoint (for all fields) is that there is just as much or more creativity currently around - but that readily available communications and publicity means that there is wider but more diffuse attention paid to more people rather than laserlike focus on a small number of individuals by a small number of information sources.

It's a very perceptive post and I agree with him completely.

GameboyRMH
GameboyRMH GRM+ Memberand MegaDork
1/7/17 12:56 p.m.
Huckleberry wrote: Good for watchers, bad for doers. But, artists were never in it for the money, right?

I'd say it's good for doers too - more talented people can catch the eyes of those who like their work instead of languishing in obscurity because the media's too busy hyper-rewarding one megacelebrity.

Trans_Maro
Trans_Maro PowerDork
1/7/17 1:39 p.m.
Appleseed wrote: I'd say Chip Foose, Troy Trepanier, Scott Sullivan, and Steve Strope come to mind. Begrudgingly, Boyd Coddington, too.

John Buttera.

Hotrodder, machinist and built his own damn indy car AND qualified in 1987.

Probably the last independent to run at Indy and probably the last production block to run as well.

jde
jde HalfDork
1/7/17 9:13 p.m.

In reply to johnnie:

Halibrand:

Hildebrand:

Huckleberry
Huckleberry MegaDork
1/7/17 9:35 p.m.
jde wrote: In reply to johnnie: Halibrand: Hildebrand:

Halberd...

NOT A TA
NOT A TA Dork
1/7/17 9:57 p.m.
Appleseed wrote: I'd say Chip Foose, Troy Trepanier, Scott Sullivan, and Steve Strope come to mind. Begrudgingly, Boyd Coddington, too.

These examples reinforce Robbies post. These guys were the last group focused on by the magazines in the 90's & early 2000's before the decline of magazines due to the internet. Now, with the internet we see so many talented people there's less focus on a few individuals.

chandlerGTi
chandlerGTi UberDork
1/8/17 8:24 a.m.

There are lots of guys BEHIND those guys who never really got the props that I think they would today. I met Bob Thrash when my brother worked with him and he was a cool down to earth guy (edit'd away). His dailys were a pro touring look Paseo with lairy graphics and a body dropped K5. This was when the Paseo was new. There are and were plenty of guys who just won't be at the forefront, Pete was because of his timing, personality and associations. RIP

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