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nutherjrfan
nutherjrfan UberDork
8/8/20 2:10 p.m.

Quick Kindle read.

Yeah. 

pilotbraden
pilotbraden UltraDork
8/8/20 6:13 p.m.

 

Just getting ready to open it.  Volume 4

P3PPY
P3PPY HalfDork
8/8/20 7:56 p.m.

Just finished Red Army and Team Yankee, as recommended to me because I love Red Storm Rising so much. I can’t say that I’d recommend either one; they felt very flat, esp Team Yankee.

So back to reading (audible-ing) RSR once more for my fix on tank/sub/plane/ASW/strategy conflict. Open to suggestions 

90BuickCentury
90BuickCentury Reader
8/9/20 3:51 p.m.

I'm reading the ingredients on cans of SPAM. Apparently Birchwood and gaseous-rum are major ingredients. Who knew?

stroker
stroker UberDork
8/21/20 7:33 a.m.
P3PPY said:

Just finished Red Army and Team Yankee, as recommended to me because I love Red Storm Rising so much. I can’t say that I’d recommend either one; they felt very flat, esp Team Yankee.

So back to reading (audible-ing) RSR once more for my fix on tank/sub/plane/ASW/strategy conflict. Open to suggestions 

Wish I could help you with that.  Nobody turning out "proto-technothriller" these days that I know of.  

Duke
Duke MegaDork
8/21/20 8:21 a.m.

I'm about 100 pages into Child 44 based on recommendations here.  Not bad so far.

 

jharry3
jharry3 HalfDork
8/21/20 8:33 a.m.

"The Stainless Steel Carrot".

Someone on here mentioned it as good book on racing and that it was going for $150 used and its out of print. 

 I checked on Amazon and sure enough all the used copies were going for $150, except one, for $50, so I bought it.   I guess I can sell it for a profit later.

Gary
Gary UltraDork
8/23/20 8:09 p.m.

R.I.P. Pete Hamill. I just found out that he passed on Aug. 5. Great guy. Great writer. I used to listen to and enjoy him as a guest on Imus thirty years ago. I read three of his many books: "A Drinking Life, a Memoir," "Snow in August," and an all-time favorite of mine, "Forever," a spectacular story and I highly recommend it. He knew the history of NYC like no one else. That's what made his writing so special. I will miss him. Pete Hamill:

mijones12
mijones12 New Reader
9/6/20 10:41 a.m.

Sometimes, when you love to read, it is difficult to answer this question laugh.
Since I am now engaged in advanced training, I read in general the professional literature written by the [canoe farm]. I love classics and novels, can someone advise something from the modern?

Antihero (Forum Supporter)
Antihero (Forum Supporter) GRM+ Memberand UltraDork
9/6/20 11:38 a.m.

Ben Bova's Death Wave.......it is not good.

 

Sad because I've really liked a lot of his books

Karacticus
Karacticus GRM+ Memberand Dork
9/6/20 12:14 p.m.

I've been burning through Charles Stross' Laundry Files

stroker
stroker UberDork
9/6/20 2:53 p.m.

I'm burning through the third installment in Ian Toll's WWII Pacific Theater trilogy, "Twilight of the Gods".  It's excellent, but reading about the brutality inflicted on the Filipinos in Manila by the Japanese occupation and the horrors of Okinawa are pretty sobering...  

rob_lewis
rob_lewis UltraDork
9/6/20 5:26 p.m.

I'm currently reading "Path to Power" book one of the LBJ biography.  It's dense with detail, but for some reason I'm intrigued.  Wasn't and LBJ fan prior to reading, but am finding his work ethic and story interesting.

-Rob

Snowdoggie
Snowdoggie HalfDork
9/7/20 10:17 a.m.
jharry3 said:

"The Stainless Steel Carrot".

Someone on here mentioned it as good book on racing and that it was going for $150 used and its out of print. 

 I checked on Amazon and sure enough all the used copies were going for $150, except one, for $50, so I bought it.   I guess I can sell it for a profit later.

Yeah. That was me. I can remember going to autocrosses where the grids were filled with 510s with BRE front spoilers and stickers all over the place. Brock's efforts really made that car a part of the sports car culture. It really is hard to believe that SCCA would kill the class rather than allow Datsun to dominate another year. I wonder what would have happened had BMW or Alfa had entered factory teams, or even if Ford or Chevy had stepped up with a factory Pinto or Cosworth Vega effort.

RevRico
RevRico PowerDork
9/7/20 11:54 a.m.

More Baxtor, I'm reading the manifold trilogy for the first time. It's...interesting?

Duke
Duke MegaDork
9/7/20 9:45 p.m.
stroker said:

I'm burning through the third installment in Ian Toll's WWII Pacific Theater trilogy, "Twilight of the Gods".  It's excellent, but reading about the brutality inflicted on the Filipinos in Manila by the Japanese occupation and the horrors of Okinawa are pretty sobering...  

Hey, I think I read the first 2 of those last year, but couldn't find the third one at the library. The first 2 were excellent. 
 

stroker
stroker UberDork
9/8/20 7:10 a.m.
Duke said:
stroker said:

I'm burning through the third installment in Ian Toll's WWII Pacific Theater trilogy, "Twilight of the Gods".  It's excellent, but reading about the brutality inflicted on the Filipinos in Manila by the Japanese occupation and the horrors of Okinawa are pretty sobering...  

Hey, I think I read the first 2 of those last year, but couldn't find the third one at the library. The first 2 were excellent. 
 

Your library/bookstore should have the third installment in about a week.

stroker
stroker UberDork
9/13/20 4:21 p.m.

Reading "Boomerang" by Michael Lewis.  Take any confidence you may have in the financial industry and throw it out the window...

Mr_Asa
Mr_Asa SuperDork
9/13/20 4:55 p.m.
Mr_Asa said:

Anyone heard of this?  It sounds interesting, but I hate trying a new author and not liking them.

 

https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/0316200204

I started in on this.  Its weird.  I love it.

Only 50-60 pages in and I'm trying to figure what the author has taken from other stories and repurposed.

chandler
chandler PowerDork
9/13/20 7:50 p.m.

Been reading some Philip Kerr books, gritty crime detective dramas set between 1921 and 1956 in mostly Germany. 

Duke
Duke MegaDork
9/14/20 10:04 a.m.
mtn (Forum Supporter) said:

Apparently Gorky Park is the first of a [so far] 9 part series.

I just finished Agent 6 which was the last in the Leo Demidov (Child 44) series. It was not as good as the first two, but I still couldn't put it down. I just wasn't happy with the last 100 pages or so.

So, in the last month or so I finished Child 44.  I thought it was pretty good overall, with some interesting twists.  I thought the third act was a little rushed and a little deus ex machina, but overall, it kept me turning pages.  I will try the next one of the Demidov books.

After that I read Polar Star, which is Smith's sequel to Gorky Park.  Kind of a lot going on, but interesting and enjoyable.  Arkady Renko is a fun character.  I don't remember it as much from Gorky Park, but in this one, Smith had a tendency to introduce things as if it was the second mention of them, which was mildly frustrating and made me go back and skim a lot to see if I had just missed it - usually, no.  But overall it was entertaining.

Currently reading The Amulet of Samarkand, which is the first in a trilogy about a demon / djinn named Bartimaeus, by Jonathan Stroud.  So far it's pretty fun magic-based fantasy, slightly dark - the main character is the only one I actually like, but that may change, and you may not be supposed to like any of the others, given the nature of the story plot / setting.

 

stroker
stroker UberDork
9/24/20 7:44 a.m.

Just finished "Hooligans" by noted Naval fiction writer P.T. Deutermann.  I wasn't terribly impressed.  I'm working through "Executive Privilege" by him which is bogged down with lots of Naval Pentagon/Beltway "inside baseball" stuff.  He was highly recommended by people I trust but I'll try one more by him before giving up.

tuna55
tuna55 MegaDork
9/24/20 8:03 a.m.

Audio books for this time-strapped dude.

 

Micro - Michael Crichton - Intruiging and surprising story, but you have to suspend your disbelief quite a bit. 

The lost world - Michael Crichton - eh, it was decent. He really skips important scientific items.

The lost world - Authur Conan Doyle - better. Not wonderful. He plays fast and loose with logic. Good ending.

Moby Dick - Wow there are a lot of words to say not a lot of things. I'm not done with this one yet.

Jerry
Jerry UberDork
9/24/20 8:07 a.m.

Duke
Duke MegaDork
9/24/20 8:23 a.m.
tuna55 said:

Audio books for this time-strapped dude.

 

Micro - Michael Crichton - Intruiging and surprising story, but you have to suspend your disbelief quite a bit. 

The lost world - Michael Crichton - eh, it was decent. He really skips important scientific items.

Micro was actually written by someone else after Crichton's death, from prep work and a draft left behind.  I don't think I read that one.  I used to be an avid Crichton fan in the '90s but I kind of gave up after a while.  I think the last one I read was about the nanobots that got out of control. Prey?  I forget.  He's at his best when he stays away from the excessively technological masturbation.

I once heard someone describe his work as "hardcover screenplays", and that's pretty accurate.  It is clear that a lot of his stuff was written just to be something he could sell the movie rights to.

Moby Dick - Wow there are a lot of words to say not a lot of things. I'm not done with this one yet.

I tried to read Moby-Dick and just couldn't get through it.  It is rare that I abandon a book without finishing.  So. Many. WORDS.  All the words.  I'm amazed there were any left to write anything else with after Melville was done.  Watch the 1956 Gregory Peck movie instead.  John Huston and Ray Bradbury wrote the adaptation and managed to get all the essential stuff in without saying it 8 times in 6 slightly different ways.

 

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