Live Thread: One week with a 2024 Hyundai Tucson Hybrid N Line

Colin
By Colin Wood
Feb 20, 2024 | Hyundai, Hybrid, New Car Review, Tucson, Live Thread, Hyundai Tucson, N Line

Photography by David S. Wallens

Wanna ride shotgun with GRM?

Welcome to this week’s test vehicle, a 2024 Hyundai Tucson Hybrid N Line.

The N Line is the “sporty” model of the bunch, but don’t expect any more power over the other available hybrid trims. Instead, the N Line gets some exclusive design touches both inside and out–primarily black and red accents and unique wheels.

Powering all versions of the Tucson Hybrid is a 1.6-liter turbocharged inline-four that’s backed by a six-speed automatic. In total, Hyundai the SUV is good for 226 horsepower and 358 lb. ft. of torque–all while returning a combined 37 mpg.

MSRP for the N Line Tucson Hybrid starts at $36,405, with our tester carrying a sticker price of $38,400.

Also, for those looking for more or less electrification, Hyundai also offers plug-in hybrid and gas-only versions of the Tucson.

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Comments
Colin Wood
Colin Wood Associate Editor
2/20/24 11:53 a.m.

The Tuscon Hybrid is one of my top picks for our family's next car, mainly because of how impressed we've been with my wife's Accent. It's not a bad place to spend time in, and I'd be willing to bet the Tucson (regardless of version) is just as nice.

David S. Wallens
David S. Wallens Editorial Director
2/20/24 12:02 p.m.

It’s pretty perfect. The controls, even the new push button shifter, makes sense. Comfortable seats. Doesn’t drive like a hybrid, in fact. 

How people consider the Hornet/Tonale when this exists is beyond me. 

David S. Wallens
David S. Wallens Editorial Director
2/20/24 12:04 p.m.

And more to come, but what do you want to know? 

J.A. Ackley
J.A. Ackley Senior Editor
2/20/24 12:11 p.m.

I drove a Tucson hybrid for a few days out in California. I was impressed with its performance. It definitely felt like it took adequate advantage of the electric motor part of the hybrid drivetrain.

David S. Wallens
David S. Wallens Editorial Director
2/20/24 4:19 p.m.

A little road trip is planned for tonight where I’ll be driving to–no, not Tuscon–DeLand. 

 

Colin Wood
Colin Wood Associate Editor
2/20/24 4:21 p.m.

In reply to David S. Wallens :

I know that place, it's right next DeWater, right?

I'll see myself out.

David S. Wallens
David S. Wallens Editorial Director
2/20/24 4:23 p.m.

In reply to Colin Wood :

Dang, that’s a good one. 

David S. Wallens
David S. Wallens Editorial Director
2/20/24 9:43 p.m.

DeLand and back this evening so a little more than an hour total in the saddle.

Listened to jazz, took some photos, ate a torta. I’d call that a good evening out. 

Where the Hornet and Outlander both offered jerky driving manners that constantly reminded you that you were driving a hybrid, the Tuscon was just smooth. No juttering, no awkward transitions from one power source to another. It drove like a normal car.

Once moving, it’s quiet, it’s composed. The steering feels connected. Seats offer plenty of support. Again, comfortable. 

I’d happily spend much more time with this one. In fact, I’m bummed that it’s going back home tomorrow. 

Oh yeah, switch it into sport mode for crisp shifts plus a transmission logic that happily let engine speeds rise to the sweet spot. 

More to come tomorrow. (Just got home.)

David S. Wallens
David S. Wallens Editorial Director
2/21/24 9:18 a.m.

Thinking about the Tuscon some more and, yeah, it exists in a crowded market. Everyone wants to sell you a mid-sized SUV or two.

If shopping this segment, I’d start with Hyundai/Kia, Toyota and Honda. Maybe Mazda.

Why the Hyundai? The driving manners, starting with the steering. Hyundai has made big leaps here, and it changes the personality of the vehicle. I know, sounds so basic, but go drive the Outlander and then get back to me. 

Fit and finish feel at or at least near the top of the class. Good use of design and materials. 

Any quibbles? A little bummed to see some traditional controls go away. I’d still love a volume knob for the radio and, while I get it’s fashionable, I’d love something a bit more tactile for the shifter. 

David S. Wallens
David S. Wallens Editorial Director
2/21/24 9:42 a.m.

How’s rear seat room? Nice and comfy for me. This me sitting behind me. 

 

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