Nismo Will Restore Your Nissan Skyline GT-R To Like-New Condition, for a Price

Colin
By Colin Wood
Dec 11, 2020 | Nissan, Restoration, Skyline GT-R, nismo, R32

Photograph Courtesy Nismo

In a widening field of manufacturer-backed restoration programs, Nissan’s performance branch, Nismo, is the latest outfit to offer such a service for customers.

At this time, it seems that only the R32-chassis GT-R is available for this service, though the restoration process is very thorough and can be customized in enormous ways to meet the customer’s needs.

Nismo summarizes its process in 12 steps:

  1. Complete disassembly of the car.
  2. Measure the dimensions of the body and make repairs.
  3. Remove paint and apply an “electrodeposited coating.”
  4. Measure the rigidity of the body.
  5. Resealing, priming and painting.
  6. Teardown and reassembly of the engine.
  7. Benchtop measurement of engine performance.
  8. Overhaul the driveline.
  9. Refurbish the suspension, brakes, fuel and air conditioning systems.
  10. Replace the electrical components.
  11. Update the interior to period-correct modern fabrics and plastics.
  12. Test drive the car and then deliver to the owner.

Of course, that’s a significant oversimplification of all the work that goes into the restoration, but perhaps the price tag can give you a better idea of how extensive the work is: 45 million yen, or approximately $431,615.

Sure, that’s roughly 12 times the price of what Hagerty considers to be the average value for a first-year model, though it’s worth noting that the restoration service is entirely customizable. For example, the website notes that in addition to having the engine retuned, it is even possible to rebuild a standard GT-R into a higher-output V-Spec model—though will still retain its factory designation as a standard GT-R.

As well, the service looks to be available to customers worldwide, though the car will have to be shipped to Japan where the restoration will take place.

For more information about the restoration process, as well as how to get your GT-R restored if you so choose, head over to the Nismo website here.

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Comments
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350z247
350z247 New Reader
12/10/20 2:19 p.m.

If this were your absolute dream car and you planned to keep it until you die, I could see spending $100,000 on this, but $430,000?! I don't see it. The number of cars you could buy, maintain, and store for $430K...

BoxheadTim (Forum Supporter)
BoxheadTim (Forum Supporter) GRM+ Memberand MegaDork
12/10/20 2:29 p.m.

In reply to 350z247 :

I think what you're seeing here is the difference between a run-of-the-mill resto, even one done by a reputable shop, and one that the manufacturer can put their name and stand behind it. The latter is going to be a lot more thorough and thus a lot more expensive.

RevolverRob
RevolverRob New Reader
12/10/20 2:35 p.m.

In reply to 350z247 :

For the folks with this kind of scratch to spend, it's no big deal.

Remember the guy paying for this, probably also has an order out for a Singer 911, a Emory Outlaw 356, an original Shelby Cobra in the garage, and alternates between his 911 Turbo, Audi R8 V10, and Ferrari 488 as daily drivers.

350z247
350z247 New Reader
12/10/20 3:06 p.m.

In reply to RevolverRob :

I don't think you can really compare this to something like a Singer (or equivalent) style build. At the end of the day, you're left with, essentially, an ever so slightly better GT-R than what you would have bought new in the 90s. A Singer is a complete reimagining with the attention to detail and increase in performance you would expect for half a million dollars (custom carbon body work, twice the power, custom wheels, race level suspension and brakes, world class interior work, ect.).

RevolverRob
RevolverRob New Reader
12/10/20 3:20 p.m.

In reply to 350z247 :

I didn't mean to draw a comparison between a Singer and a NISMO restored GTR. I meant that the individual who spends $430,000 on a freshly restored R32 GTR is the kind of person that can spend money on things like a Singer, etc. They are not concerned that it cost $430,000. 

I remember one year being at the Monterey Historics, when someone crashed a ~$5,000,000 Ferrari on the track. My father and I were standing there when it happened and I immediately blurted out, "Oh my god, all that money lost!"

My father looks at me and says, "Anyone who is able to afford to bring their five million dollar historic Ferrari out to race, can afford to fix it."

It's a whole new level of wealth and way of thinking about things compared to what most of us are doing on a daily basis. For me, personally, I would never spend this kind of money on a GTR, or frankly any Nissan. But according to my bank account this is not a problem I have to worry about.

350z247
350z247 New Reader
12/10/20 3:25 p.m.

In reply to RevolverRob :

Ah, yes, then I entirely agree. I just went to the HSR race at Sebring last weekend, and these guys do a track weekend WAY differently than I do. I was camping in my R53 Mini while they were having a waiter serve them chamagne while a mechanic tuned up their GT40. It was just unimaginable.

CrustyRedXpress (Forum Supporter)
CrustyRedXpress (Forum Supporter) Reader
12/10/20 3:53 p.m.

Acura floated a similar program to Gen 1 NSX owners a few months ago. IIRC the prices were more reasonable, but still eye opening. Manufactures are starting to understand how important their history is to their current brand in the eyes of their perspective buyer.

Pete. (l33t FS)
Pete. (l33t FS) MegaDork
12/10/20 5:13 p.m.
RevolverRob said:

In reply to 350z247 :

I didn't mean to draw a comparison between a Singer and a NISMO restored GTR. I meant that the individual who spends $430,000 on a freshly restored R32 GTR is the kind of person that can spend money on things like a Singer, etc. They are not concerned that it cost $430,000. 

I remember one year being at the Monterey Historics, when someone crashed a ~$5,000,000 Ferrari on the track. My father and I were standing there when it happened and I immediately blurted out, "Oh my god, all that money lost!"

My father looks at me and says, "Anyone who is able to afford to bring their five million dollar historic Ferrari out to race, can afford to fix it."

It's a whole new level of wealth and way of thinking about things compared to what most of us are doing on a daily basis. For me, personally, I would never spend this kind of money on a GTR, or frankly any Nissan. But according to my bank account this is not a problem I have to worry about.

Plus, once over a certain point, the car's value doesn't matter.  A 5 million dollar car costs as much to fix as a $500,000 car.

 

Personally, I think this is awesome.  One can get a brand new R32. 

 

Practically, Nissan did something similar for the S30 and there were very few takers.

Pete. (l33t FS)
Pete. (l33t FS) MegaDork
12/10/20 5:14 p.m.
CrustyRedXpress (Forum Supporter) said:

Acura floated a similar program to Gen 1 NSX owners a few months ago. IIRC the prices were more reasonable, but still eye opening. Manufactures are starting to understand how important their history is to their current brand in the eyes of their perspective buyer.

*cough* and they don't make enthusiast vehicles anymore anyway, so fixing up used cars for the three remaining new-car buyers who don't want a truck makes sense *cough*

Flynlow (FS)
Flynlow (FS) HalfDork
12/10/20 7:04 p.m.

I hope this means I can get any seals, electric bits, or other tiny parts I need to keep mine on the road for a long time. 

 

I love seeing this level of support from an OEM, whether its Porsche, Mazda, Nissan, Honda, or any others.  I can't afford it, but I'm happy it exists in the world smiley.

Datsun310Guy
Datsun310Guy MegaDork
12/10/20 8:23 p.m.

Surprising Nissan is trying this given the 240Z rebuild program that seemed to tank but then again they're shooting a higher price to cover their costs.  
 

https://jalopnik.com/what-happened-to-all-the-datsun-240zs-nissan-restored-i-1583370936/amp

David S. Wallens
David S. Wallens Editorial Director
12/10/20 9:38 p.m.
Datsun310Guy said:

Surprising Nissan is trying this given the 240Z rebuild program that seemed to tank but then again they're shooting a higher price to cover their costs.  
 

https://jalopnik.com/what-happened-to-all-the-datsun-240zs-nissan-restored-i-1583370936/amp

Call that a good learning experience. But glad to see corporate pay extra attention to the R32.

crankwalk (Forum Supporter)
crankwalk (Forum Supporter) GRM+ Memberand SuperDork
12/11/20 8:48 a.m.
Datsun310Guy said:

Surprising Nissan is trying this given the 240Z rebuild program that seemed to tank but then again they're shooting a higher price to cover their costs.  
 

https://jalopnik.com/what-happened-to-all-the-datsun-240zs-nissan-restored-i-1583370936/amp

I was about to say this hasn't really worked before. In fact with prices on s30s lately, they might have better luck with it these days. In the 90s, early 2000s I was buying series 1 240s for $1500 running.

David S. Wallens
David S. Wallens Editorial Director
12/11/20 5:08 p.m.

So, restoration price check. I talked to a friend who manages a restoration shop. We picked an MGA as our example--no computers, no AWD, no turbos, no power windows, not much of anything.

If restoring one to Nismo's standards--meaning a full concours restoration--you'd be lucky if the job started at $100,000. 

Woofwoof
Woofwoof New Reader
12/11/20 6:54 p.m.

430K! Come on, that's for a guy that has this sort of money as loose change or has got some massive emotional attachment to an R32 .

Worse still if somebody did take the plunge and got their car restored by Nissan most would be afraid to use it as intended defeating the whole point in owning such a car in the first place.  

I reckon diehard petrolheads wouldn't think it's value in any way considering what could be bought for the same money or more importantly what could be bought for far less.

Then again what do I know? I couldn't afford it. sad

 

 

 

 

Woofwoof
Woofwoof New Reader
12/11/20 7:00 p.m.
David S. Wallens said:

So, restoration price check. I talked to a friend who manages a restoration shop. We picked an MGA as our example--no computers, no AWD, no turbos, no power windows, not much of anything.

If restoring one to Nismo's standards--meaning a full concours restoration--you'd be lucky if the job started at $100,000. 

100k vs 430k? The comparison difference is 400%. There's many that could justify 100k, including myself but 430k? 

Pete. (l33t FS)
Pete. (l33t FS) MegaDork
12/11/20 7:22 p.m.

In reply to Woofwoof :

$100k is really low for the sheer comprehensiveness involved.

I also assume, if they are stress testing the chassis for torsional rigidity and such, that there will be a certain number of discards before they get a shell that meets whatever standard they have.

Duke
Duke MegaDork
12/11/20 7:27 p.m.

From reading that description it seems like basically they keep the unibody and other big metal parts and that's it. All new electrical components and wiring. Plus all new plastics and upholstery and pretty much everything else. 

$430k doesn't surprise me a bit. 
 

CrustyRedXpress (Forum Supporter)
CrustyRedXpress (Forum Supporter) Reader
12/12/20 1:19 p.m.

In reply to Pete. (l33t FS) :

Yeah. It was particularly ironic since the program would happen at the Ohio plant where the Gen 2 NSX is made. If you read between the lines they have extra capacity and are trying to figure out how to use it.  Still, I'm glad they're doing it!

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