What does it take to swap a V6 into a Toyota MR2? | Full parts list | Project Toyota MR2 V6

J.G.
Update by J.G. Pasterjak to the Toyota MR2 Turbo project car
Sep 28, 2022 | Toyota, MR2, Wilhelm Raceworks, Toyota MR2 Turbo, Frankenstein Motorworks

The term “plug and play” gets tossed around so much that it seems to have lost all meaning–at least when it comes to engine swaps. Even so, the more pieces we get in hand for our Toyota MR2’s upcoming V6 transplant, the less intimidating the project becomes.

We’re swapping a 2GR-FE engine–think Toyota Camry–into our 1991 Toyota MR2 …

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Tyler H
Tyler H GRM+ Memberand UberDork
9/28/22 9:59 a.m.

Heck yes!  Watching this with interest.  A V6 in an MR2 is just right.

JG Pasterjak
JG Pasterjak Production/Art Director
9/28/22 11:48 a.m.
Tyler H said:

Heck yes!  Watching this with interest.  A V6 in an MR2 is just right.

Obviously I'm biased, but this really does seem like a nice combo, doesn't it?  A 7200rpm 300hp mid-engined V6 sports car has a real logical feel about it.

wspohn
wspohn SuperDork
9/28/22 11:51 a.m.

Makes sense to use another Toyota engine but I can't help but wonder how a modern turbo 4 cylinder would have worked out - more power, and probably save a little weight even with the turbo.  There are a number out there, mostly direct injection, with huge power possibilities.

BA5
BA5 GRM+ Memberand Reader
9/28/22 12:38 p.m.

I'm at the starter/alternator stage with my own V6 swap (Honda, not Toyota). 

Is this car going to be a track only car?  I could mount up an alternator easy enough, but I'm also considering running a total loss electrical system.  You guys ever do that or know anyone that did?

maschinenbau
maschinenbau GRM+ Memberand UberDork
9/28/22 3:18 p.m.

I love watching you spend real money to do an actual good quality version of the same swap I'm doing for less than $2000. 

And I can attest to Marc's legendary community support. He has been a huge help for the 2GR Lotus Europa so far.

GameboyRMH
GameboyRMH GRM+ Memberand MegaDork
9/28/22 4:48 p.m.
BA5 said:

I'm at the starter/alternator stage with my own V6 swap (Honda, not Toyota). 

Is this car going to be a track only car?  I could mount up an alternator easy enough, but I'm also considering running a total loss electrical system.  You guys ever do that or know anyone that did?

I've only heard of people doing that on go-karts and landspeed cars. The karts have very low electrical draw requirements, and the landspeed cars only have to run for a <10mins at a time between extensive prep for runs which includes charging. The landspeed cars can also run massive batteries since weight isn't an issue.

JG Pasterjak
JG Pasterjak Production/Art Director
9/28/22 5:15 p.m.
maschinenbau said:

I love watching you spend real money to do an actual good quality version of the same swap I'm doing for less than $2000. 

And I can attest to Marc's legendary community support. He has been a huge help for the 2GR Lotus Europa so far.

Yeah part of me sees the bills adding up and winces, but another part of me sees the quality and thought that went in to so many of the parts nd realizes how much heartache they're saving in the long run. 

It's like buying a dishwasher. Could I theoretically build a device that washed dishes cheaper than I could buy one for at Home Depot? Sure. Would it brak half my dishes and kill one of my neighbors? Yeah, probably. Home Depot wins this round.

J.A. Ackley
J.A. Ackley Senior Editor
9/28/22 5:15 p.m.
BA5 said:

I'm at the starter/alternator stage with my own V6 swap (Honda, not Toyota). 

Is this car going to be a track only car?  I could mount up an alternator easy enough, but I'm also considering running a total loss electrical system.  You guys ever do that or know anyone that did?

Many oval-track cars do that, but they don't have as many electronics as most track-day cars do. A distributor. An ignition. Spark plugs.  A starter. Some gauges. That's about it. They run up to 50 laps, but often have their batteries on a charger in between times they hit the track.

The key would be knowing how much power your car draws, how much time you would need that power, and how much battery it would take to keep it going.

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